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Public Schools: Prisons By Any Other Name

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posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 06:55 PM
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Really getting to like this woman.


Agree or not, the parallels she lays out can not be ignored.



Seen all her work and this one is just as well put together as her others.

More here:

josietheoutlaw.com...

Peace




posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:13 PM
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She was on Alex Jones today. I liked a lot of what she said in the interview and it made me interested in the rest of her stuff.

She does have a lot of good points and stuff that is worth watching.




posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Thanks Jude. F&S, I'm going over to listen to a lot more of Josie.

I still am convinced one of the five most dangerous institutions launched in the 20th century was the National Education Association. And that guy that wrote most of the steering documents, the former head of the GDR Stasi? : Marcus Wolfe.
The Prussian model sure worked, check the results.
I got out after high school because my BS filter was getting clogged too often... found a good trade instead and never looked back. Hope you're doing well, and thanks again



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:18 PM
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Kangaruex4Ewe
She was on Alex Jones today. I liked a lot of what she said in the interview and it made me interested in the rest of her stuff.

She does have a lot of good points and stuff that is worth watching.



Absolutely.

No nonsense or hype...just facts.

Peace



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:20 PM
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Kangaruex4Ewe
She was on Alex Jones today. I liked a lot of what she said in the interview and it made me interested in the rest of her stuff.

She does have a lot of good points and stuff that is worth watching.


Still have some archived streams from a few years back of Alex and Dr. Gatto, the stuff was credible and quite scary. The mold closed on us so slowly we couldn't notice...



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:26 PM
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She does make some very good points, but I think she is way off for the most part.

We, as parents, still have control over education...but WE have become lazy and complacent; forcing these government-ran schools to pick up the slack. Since they do not have the resources to concentrate on each child, they must take an institutional approach.

The blame lies with us. Not with government or the schools.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I have thought this way for many years.
Thanks for the video, I will be looking at her website now.

S&F for you.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:31 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 


I think most students these days will learn far more from reading the internet than they will in classrooms anyways. I know some schools suck, but I could leave my high school at anytime and my education was one of the major reasons I have a full time job today.

With that said I agree that schools and the format of education are due for some major reform. How that looks should be based in science instead of abstract theories.
edit on 14-1-2014 by Vipassana because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


if public school is a prison, then catholic school is a n. korean prison ! i don't get it ? i got out of 8 yrs of catholic school with 2 concussios and a jaw that doesn't line up quite right anymore (catholic nuns LUV slapping little kids in the face !) tell me, when nuns break 3 fingers on you cousins hand because her skirt is 1/8th of an inch to short, that's how they demonstrate how much jesus luvs kids right? kids these days have it EASY ! NOT !
(not really, none of my grandkids are in school. they are all home schooled ) where they can be protected by the AWESOME FN/FAL !



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:37 PM
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sheepslayer247
She does make some very good points, but I think she is way off for the most part.

We, as parents, still have control over education...but WE have become lazy and complacent; forcing these government-ran schools to pick up the slack. Since they do not have the resources to concentrate on each child, they must take an institutional approach.

The blame lies with us. Not with government or the schools.


When we leave them at the bus stop, we give over control. I agree tho on the laziness.
We say we trust the system just so we can be lazy by Doing nothing.

Not all but the majority. That's how we got here.

Peace



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:39 PM
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reply to post by sheepslayer247
 


Read The Business of Reforming American Schools. It basically starts out with dear old Horace Mann and talks about how schools have been basically structurally organized to create what society needs, not necessarily well-educated or well-adjusted individuals. They are perfect little factory floors for imprinting what we need our the children to grow up to be.

Parents only have marginal control and only if they fight ... a lot. How much say have most of them had against the books and materials their schools have chosen to use with the new Common Core standards? How many of them had a say in whether or not those standards were adopted?

Do they get any say in what kind of classes their children get a chance to partake in?

No, only if your parents are wealthy enough to be able to buy you an education of choice do you have a chance to get those things as a child in America. No public school supplies any of that unless you get very lucky.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:44 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I just saw this on yahoo....sports.yahoo.com... I can't believe this, in my state it is against the law to cut hair without a barber's license. What makes it OK for a guidance counselor to do this? I would hogtie him/her and shave their head especially because I was a licensed hair dresser and that was my kid. Damnd Nazi State!



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I will respectfully disagree.

My wife and I monitor what they are taught and we communicate with teachers when questions or concerns arise. Also, I am very quick to tell my children that what they were taught was wrong. Education of our kids never ends and is more influential in the home.

We just need to be more proactive with them and proactive with the schools. You would be amazed to know how many times I have had to "school" a teacher for the outright BS they were shoveling to my kids.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:50 PM
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sheepslayer247
She does make some very good points, but I think she is way off for the most part.

We, as parents, still have control over education...but WE have become lazy and complacent; forcing these government-ran schools to pick up the slack. Since they do not have the resources to concentrate on each child, they must take an institutional approach.

The blame lies with us. Not with government or the schools.

I agree to a point, but our actions as parents reflect exactly what this young lady is talking about. We were indoctrinated too, and we hand over our children to that same indoctrination. Who will in turn hand over their children. It's the law. I don't think we had to do any forcing of government run schools to get them to take control. Our children are being trained, not educated.

Just my two shillings.

ETA: I would also add that the nominal amount of control we think we have is illusory. As well, I think as parents, we don't recognize indoctrination when we see it, because of our own upbringing. Again, just my opinion.

I applaud you for taking the active role you have. It's good for a child to know their parents don't always agree with everything the institution does.
edit on 1/14/2014 by Klassified because: eta



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Have always believed this. School in my day was just like a prison. Today, in many ways, it's worse.

Zero tolerance rules make situations where little kids are slapped with "sexual harassment" for hugging a fellow kindergartner, or kicked out for bringing a toy green plastic soldier (not that I'm fond of that for a toy for kids) to school by accident in their pocket.

My kid was accused of peeing on the floor in the restroom (bullied and intimidated by the asst principal) when he was a teen, and he kept saying he didn't do it and didn't know what they were talking about. Come to find out some kid spilled mountain dew on the floor. No apologies made. Was made to feel he was a lowlife jerk by some a--wipe.

Was also accused of drawing on a bench at a different school in the system on a weekend -- police were brought into his school and they all accused and threatened him with expulsion, etc. until he confessed or told who did it. All this happened without anyone contacting me. Given he was a teen, he did not turn on his friend, said he did it (he did not) and was charged with vandalism.

My other child was little, we were poor, and he didn't have play-doh for "quiet time at your desk" each day, so instead he'd take out of all things -- gasp -- a book to look at while the other kids did their play=doh thing (first grade). He got yelled at, made to feel less than, and punished. I was sent a note from the teacher about how he was looking at books instead of doing as told.
Made my blood boil. I wrote a scathing letter to her - saying I could barely buy a pack of gum or pay my bills, and that I'm sorry we didn't have money for play-doh, and that I was proud that my son chose to read a book. She did send me an apology note.

All they wanted was my child to be on ADHD drugs. But when I said he had "ADHD" - they said he didn't, that he was just "bad." - Despite my having a diagnosis in hand from a psychologist, psychiatrist and neurologist. They refused to do an IEP or plan for him. I had to get a state advocate and force them with letters cc-ing attorneys before they'd set up a plan. And even after the plan, they said he was just "bad."

My other child, they said he was always questioning things, especially rules and rote. His artistic, creative energies were frowned upon.

Bullies were allowed to bully, with words and sometimes physical threats. School did nothing despite my complaints. I found the principals in many cases to be "bullies" themselves - towards me and my kid. If your kid wasn't a popular football player type -- they were seen as "problems." Weird.

When you step back and look at the school system, what an ingenious way to groom a population.

Education is important. Learning is important. But our school system tends to stifle learning and instead teach compliance and conformity.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by ketsuko
 


Yes, wealth matters in education. No doubt there, but wealth does not replace the interaction we have as parents with kids and the value of instilling common sense and other values that help create an individual ready to tackle the world.

Very little of what I learned in school applies to what I do for a living today, except a bit of chemistry and physics. But the lessons I learned from people in my life helped me much more.

ETA: Yes, students and parents have a choice in which classes are taken.
edit on 14-1-2014 by sheepslayer247 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by Klassified
 


I think the "law" of education is a separate matter altogether. We would agree on that. But I do not agree with the extent this woman is taking it.

Maybe we need to touch on this topic on the next show.

edit on 14-1-2014 by sheepslayer247 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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ketsuko
reply to post by sheepslayer247
 


Do they get any say in what kind of classes their children get a chance to partake in?

No, only if your parents are wealthy enough to be able to buy you an education of choice do you have a chance to get those things as a child in America. No public school supplies any of that unless you get very lucky.


At one point I was going to go for a masters in education and switch my career. I was accepted into the program, but $$$ stopped me from taking the plunge. I would have been assigned to student teach at a local private school (in a ritzy neighborhood). I spent a day at the school as part of my application interview process.

I had never been to a private school. I was amazed at how different it was, how alive and fun and colorful. They lessons were extraordinary. The field trips were incredible (I didn't go, but read about all trips as they related to the lessons). It was very different than my kids' public elementary school.


edit on 14-1-2014 by Galadriel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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sheepslayer247
reply to post by Klassified
 


I thing the "law" of education is a separate matter altogether. We would agree on that. But I do not agree with the extent this woman is taking it.

Maybe we need to touch on this topic on the next show.


This would be a good thread SS. I think we should.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:29 PM
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Klassified

sheepslayer247
She does make some very good points, but I think she is way off for the most part.

We, as parents, still have control over education...but WE have become lazy and complacent; forcing these government-ran schools to pick up the slack. Since they do not have the resources to concentrate on each child, they must take an institutional approach.

The blame lies with us. Not with government or the schools.

I agree to a point, but our actions as parents reflect exactly what this young lady is talking about. We were indoctrinated too, and we hand over our children to that same indoctrination. Who will in turn hand over their children. It's the law. I don't think we had to do any forcing of government run schools to get them to take control. Our children are being trained, not educated.

Just my two shillings.

ETA: I would also add that the nominal amount of control we think we have is illusory. As well, I think as parents, we don't recognize indoctrination when we see it, because of our own upbringing. Again, just my opinion.

I applaud you for taking the active role you have. It's good for a child to know their parents don't always agree with everything the institution does.
edit on 1/14/2014 by Klassified because: eta


AgreeD.

Many won't recognize indoctrination because we have been brought up being taught that we are free to think and be who we want to be as we get older. Easiest way to control a people is by steps not leaps.

If we believe we have control as a whole then the one who sees the truth first will be the outcast.

Peace



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