Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

New Invention: Triton Oxygen Respirator Extracts Air Underwater!

page: 1
69
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
+51 more 
posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:13 AM
link   
A new invention looks set to revolusionise Scuba and diving in general.

It's called the 'Triton Oxygen Respirator', a small but remarkable device that will do away for the need to carry bulky tanks on dives, and allow the dives to last much, much longer than can be had with conventional equipment.

It's amazing function lies in the design of tiny, nano scale 'artificial Gills', a series of small strands or threads have tiny holes along their length, which are smaller than water molecules, and can effectively separate the Oxygen from the water while diving, on demand.

Here's what it looks like.











Links for more information;

Yanko Design

Trend Hunter

Looks amazing doesn't it.

Thinking ahead, apart from applications in the Scuba industry, this could well find its way onto private, commercial and military ships as a safety device issued to all crew and passengers, aircraft too if they have to ditch into the sea.

With slight modification, it could also be used on land, by firefighters in smoke filled building for example.

All they'd need would be a small canister of water or something similar to a hydration backpack to extract O2 from..there's a lot of O2 in a single litre of water..about 630 litres worth.

We breathe about 6 litres per minute (when resting) and maybe 10 times that when working hard, so a pack containing 2 or 3 litres of water will supply a fair amount of O2, enough to last long enough to search and rescue people from smoke filled buildings.

The weight savings will help emergency responders to move around more easily too without having to carry bulky and heavy tanks around with them.

Exciting stuff.




posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:20 AM
link   
If this works well enough to allow a person to breath underwater without an oxygen tank my mind will be blown. If it does work as stated I'm sure there will still be some risks associated with using it. For example if you hit a pocket of low oxygen water or swim deep enough it may stop working. Still absolutely brilliant.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:21 AM
link   
reply to post by MysterX
 


I am not a diver, nor do I care to become one, but this device seems like it would be readily adaptable to several different scenarios, and it is so compact! The addition of a face shield and an adaptation to screen out chemical, biological, and radiological material would make it a brilliant addition to an NBC bug out bag!



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:23 AM
link   
That is very cool. Though as a diver, I would never rely on this thing solely. Say it fails and you are deep in a cave dive...better have a backup tank or at least another one of these with you at the time.

I like the application of it adapted for firefighters as you suggested....that could be a HUGE plus. If they were able to bring a couple of these into a building and supply fresh oxygen to those they were rescuing at the start it could save some lives me thinks.

I an actually see this becoming somewhat mandatory for boaters as well....kind of like a life vest. That or many boaters would want to have one on board.

Wonder if this would take away the need for scuba certification since it would take the complications out of scuba gear completely.

Nice thread!



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:30 AM
link   
reply to post by MysterX
 


pure oxygen can be dangerous,scuba tanks only use dried air.This will be good for over 200 ft depth tho



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:34 AM
link   
Wow what an amazing device!

I want one for bath time



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:38 AM
link   
WANT!!!


Must have!



I'm wondering what the efficiency of this is per liter of water?
Depending on the efficiency, a similar device could be requisitioned for use in space exploration.
It'd be less bulky to carry a few liters of water around than the current solutions.




edit on 1/14/2014 by AliceBleachWhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:39 AM
link   
Here is a similar concept that I like the design on a bit better....though I would not rely on either one solely. This one has it's downfalls as well but still a very cool concept.

Immersed Senses Helmet







posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:41 AM
link   
GReat find! thanks for sharing. I have been scubba diving before and it is so much fun. The downside has always been the bulky equipment to carry with you...most tanks are what 1-2 hours O2...if you want a good long dive or are many people, youd need to carry a lot of tanks with you.

But with this you could save tons of space and weight...now the Real question. How much will this cost??? As another poster said, it would likely be much safer to have a 2nd one of these as a backup...so if they cost an arm and a leg, and you want 2, you would be diving without limbs....

Oh and I want one!!!
edit on 14-1-2014 by Teye22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:42 AM
link   
reply to post by MysterX
 


As far as I can tell this is a conceptual idea only. No prototype has been built and nothing has been tested. Maybe it will work... someday... but this is a long way from your local Wal-Mart shelves unless you have information I've been unable to find.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 08:48 AM
link   
One of my absolute favorite things about the time we live in is how science fiction is becoming science fact !!!
This thing is incredible.
Cant wait to see what else the roll out in the next 10 - 20 years.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 09:01 AM
link   

jtma508
reply to post by MysterX
 


As far as I can tell this is a conceptual idea only.


A conceptual idea knocked off from the Star Wars franchise:

starwars.wikia.com...


The A99 aquata breather was a small breathing apparatus that allowed oxygen-breathing lifeforms to survive underwater, in space, or among noxious gas for up to two hours. Jedi Knights commonly carried aquata breathers during field operations.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 09:07 AM
link   

Triton uses a new technology of artificial gill model.
It extracts oxygen under water through a filter in the form of fine threads with holes smaller than water molecules.
This is a technology developed by a Korean scientist that allows us to freely breathe under water for a long time.
Using a very small but powerful micro compressor, it compresses oxygen and stores the extracted oxygen in storage tank.
The micro compressor operates through micro battery.
The micro battery is a next-generation technology with a size 30 times smaller than current battery that can quickly charge 1,000 times faster.


The guy saw star wars ep I and rip off the idea, seems really impossible that he is going to filter the oxygen from water, what are you gonna fill your lungs with if its the lungs what move the water through the filter?



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 09:19 AM
link   

AliceBleachWhite
WANT!!!


Must have!



I'm wondering what the efficiency of this is per liter of water?
Depending on the efficiency, a similar device could be requisitioned for use in space exploration.
It'd be less bulky to carry a few liters of water around than the current solutions.




edit on 1/14/2014 by AliceBleachWhite because: (no reason given)


I think there is a bit of misunderstanding, the device in the OP doesn't split oxygen from hydrogen, it simply "filters" tiny air bubbles in the water out in a similar fashion to fish.

Although even if it was splitting oxygen from hydrogen, carrying water for oxygen purposes seems a bit odd when you can simply carry liquid oxygen which would contain more oxygen than the same amount of water.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 09:26 AM
link   
reply to post by MysterX
 





All they'd need would be a small canister of water or something similar to a hydration backpack to extract O2 from..there's a lot of O2 in a single litre of water..about 630 litres worth.


how do you come with this numbers?



Oxigen solubility in water

This stuff is not breaking water molecules, its only filtrating the solubilized oxygen in the water

------------------
the previous post beat me to it, o2 can be liquefied and compressed, water no
edit on 14-1-2014 by Indigent because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 09:37 AM
link   
reply to post by TrueBrit
 


Absolutely.

I can see many uses from a military POV too.

At a pinch..i suppose even Urine could be used to make oxygen.



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 09:39 AM
link   
reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


Wow...that looks super cool too.

It's gone all Buck Rogers lately!



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 09:45 AM
link   
reply to post by Teye22
 


Thank you too.

Never been diving myself, but with one of these or one of those funky orange helmets i'd be up for it...but it'd have to have a spare or backup battery i think...wouldn't fancy being down deep and the battery runs flat.

edit on 14-1-2014 by MysterX because: typo



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 09:55 AM
link   
reply to post by Indigent
 


I'm not a chemist i'm afraid, found the numbers on a couple of sites while browsing around trying to work out how much water would have to be carried versus how long you could breathe for..

Apologies if the numbers are wrong.

It seems i was wrong about how the device separated O2 from water too then. I thought it was due to the artificial gills and power supply creating some type of membrane related electrolysis. I realise you can't compress water though, i didn't think it was compressing water, but separating it.

Ah well..it looks nice.


edit on 14-1-2014 by MysterX because: added info



posted on Jan, 14 2014 @ 10:01 AM
link   
reply to post by jtma508
 


I was excited as soon as i came across this, and wanted to let you guys know and see it for yourselves.

The image of the device being held in a hand lead me to assume it was already in production, or at least in prototype stage.

Perhaps i should've researched it a bit more before posting.





new topics

top topics



 
69
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join