It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Stepping waay outta my comfort zone today

page: 3
36
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 16 2014 @ 05:16 PM
link   

ninepointfive
You were hired for a machine shop without having prior CNC experience?
Do you know how to run manual vertical mills, and lathes?

If not, then you were hired because of affirmative action.


Who really cares? They were willing to train as many companies are. And she's willing to learn. People who are certified command higher prices, while a company that is willing to OJT doesn't have to start at the high pay scale and earns the employee loyalty while providing other benefits. Eventually the pay scale equals out.

It all works out in the end.




posted on Jan, 16 2014 @ 09:06 PM
link   

ninepointfive
You were hired for a machine shop without having prior CNC experience?
Do you know how to run manual vertical mills, and lathes?

If not, then you were hired because of affirmative action.



Not true.

A lot of small machine shops prefer to train on the job in order to save themselves from having to pay higher wage rates to new employees... it's what keeps them alive in a competetive market. It also depends on what kind of machine shop it is: custom machine shops require certified operators more often whereas assembly-line standard parts machine shops don't.


What difference does it make whether it's a mill, or a lathe, or a router, etc. ?

Computer operated is computer operated. No need for the operator to be highly skilled in precision cutting techniques anymore with the kind of programming capabilities CNC machinery has these days. Hell there's not even a need for templates on most of them anymore either.



posted on Jan, 16 2014 @ 09:48 PM
link   
reply to post by ieatbrains
 


Very best of luck. Just be yourself, smile, and enjoy it. You'll be fine.



posted on Jan, 16 2014 @ 09:57 PM
link   
reply to post by ieatbrains
 

Don't stress all you have to do is press the green button. Mabie do some work offsets and some very basic math. Just remember the difference between xyz positive and negative. Cnc mill , or lathe?

edit on 3117114ThuPM03K by tinyDAWK because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 03:30 AM
link   
CNC mill. I'm learning all about the XYZ pos and neg..its pretty much load, push the button and watch the screen ( and listen because if something goes wrong you will hear it), unload and measure..do it again. I think I was hired based on my willingness to learn and I live close. I m a quick learner too and have been on my own since Wednesday and I'm making as many parts as the people who have worked there awhile. This place has a high turnover rate due to the fact people can't deal with getting dirty or working 50 hours a week ( lots of mandatory overtime). Its a small shop in a small country town that is booming in this bad economy..I'm just grateful to have a job that started well above min wage and has room to grow if you show interest.
I can't wait to see my first paycheck with all that overtime so excited!!!! Also glad its Friday, planning on having a few Jack and cokes to celebrate getting through the first week successfully.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 05:18 AM
link   
reply to post by ieatbrains
 


I am really glad that you have had a positive experience with regard to your first week of professionally messing about with big machinery! When I started my current career, I was not entirely comfortable with the use of even a simple cordless drill, but now I am proficient in the use of more than a hundred individual bits of kit, some of which are unique to my profession, and others of which are near enough universally handy. I never thought I would do work of the sort that I do now, before I begun to learn on the job, and I can safely say that now, I have no idea what I would do if I was not doing the job I do. I certainly could not conceive of doing a different job.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 04:11 PM
link   
reply to post by ieatbrains
 

That's fun. I get to play in a machine shop all day too. It's a blast, and I hope for the best for you. Just remember to always wear your safety glasses , keep shirt tucked in, avoid long\baggy sleeves, don't wear jewelry, keep hair up. You will do fine



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 04:54 PM
link   

CranialSponge

ninepointfive
You were hired for a machine shop without having prior CNC experience?
Do you know how to run manual vertical mills, and lathes?

If not, then you were hired because of affirmative action.



Not true.

A lot of small machine shops prefer to train on the job in order to save themselves from having to pay higher wage rates to new employees... it's what keeps them alive in a competetive market. It also depends on what kind of machine shop it is: custom machine shops require certified operators more often whereas assembly-line standard parts machine shops don't.


What difference does it make whether it's a mill, or a lathe, or a router, etc. ?

Computer operated is computer operated. No need for the operator to be highly skilled in precision cutting techniques anymore with the kind of programming capabilities CNC machinery has these days. Hell there's not even a need for templates on most of them anymore either.



Computer operated is computer operated? And shops hire people with no experience to keep costs down? That is one hell of a stretch there. Not true? People not knowing what they're doing and learning on the job in a machine shop is much more costly and will not save on labor costs. It's even dangerous.


Look, I never said I wasn't happy she got the job.
But I'm in the industry, and 40,000 - 250,000 machines don't just run themselves because they're computerized. It's a big deal.

edit on 17-1-2014 by ninepointfive because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 06:20 PM
link   
reply to post by ninepointfive
 


I kind of get where your coming from a little..I'm sure in a bigger shop I never would have gotten a chance, but this is a smaller shop and although I am working on my own they do not expect me to change the tools or work on anything myself..,if you want to eventually learn they will teach you but if something goes wrong I go get a set up man or mechanic. Also I'm sure if they thought I was a bubble head and stupid enough to reach into a running machine, walk in front of a forklift, ect they probably would gave gotten rid of me by now or at least moved me to do something else.
Luckily I'm not an idiot because honestly not even affirmative action could save me if I was.



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 06:26 PM
link   
reply to post by TrueBrit
 


Thanks!! I really like it...kinda never want to go back to a boring desk job again!



posted on Jan, 17 2014 @ 11:46 PM
link   
reply to post by ieatbrains
 

Oh sweet, you don't even have to do set up? Cakewalk job. But after you get settled in... u should learn. It's not too hard, and they will pay you more if you can do your own setup.

Oh, and 9.5 above me... dude u said you were in the industry so u should know that operating a Cnc machine isn't that hard.. u press green, measuring parts to check tool wear, and watch for tool breaking. U don't have to worry about crashing 5 he machine because that's the programmer and offset guys fault.



posted on Jan, 18 2014 @ 05:17 AM
link   

ninepointfive

CranialSponge

ninepointfive
You were hired for a machine shop without having prior CNC experience?
Do you know how to run manual vertical mills, and lathes?

If not, then you were hired because of affirmative action.



Not true.

A lot of small machine shops prefer to train on the job in order to save themselves from having to pay higher wage rates to new employees... it's what keeps them alive in a competetive market. It also depends on what kind of machine shop it is: custom machine shops require certified operators more often whereas assembly-line standard parts machine shops don't.


What difference does it make whether it's a mill, or a lathe, or a router, etc. ?

Computer operated is computer operated. No need for the operator to be highly skilled in precision cutting techniques anymore with the kind of programming capabilities CNC machinery has these days. Hell there's not even a need for templates on most of them anymore either.



Computer operated is computer operated? And shops hire people with no experience to keep costs down? That is one hell of a stretch there. Not true? People not knowing what they're doing and learning on the job in a machine shop is much more costly and will not save on labor costs. It's even dangerous.


Look, I never said I wasn't happy she got the job.
But I'm in the industry, and 40,000 - 250,000 machines don't just run themselves because they're computerized. It's a big deal.

edit on 17-1-2014 by ninepointfive because: (no reason given)



I was in the industry for over 15 years.... on the financial side of things.... overseeing costs of running production machine shops and steel fab plants. With CNC machinery that was $200,000 - 500,000 in large multi-million dollar shop operations.... working side by side with engineers, programmers, plant managers, etc. Overseeing man hours, set up costs, production operations, revenue recovery from capital expenditures, and so on.

So yes, I do know exactly what I'm talking about.



new topics

top topics



 
36
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join