It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

How do weather people get the correct weather from satellites?

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:23 PM
link   
Seriously, I have been wondering this because if I remember correctly what is seen from space is not the correct time that is here on earth. Have they made satellites able to make it so they get the correct year and all or does that only count for beyond the moon? When does time slow down in space? I just don't really understand. This is also a reason why I think aliens from other planets don't help us, because they probably see bombs going off during a time they are about to help but instead they would rather stay out of trouble. I figured I would ask here because I don't really know what to search in Google bout this. I hope I am being clear and not confusing.




posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:26 PM
link   

neobludragon
if I remember correctly what is seen from space is not the correct time that is here on earth.


Why do you think that?


Have they made satellites able to make it so they get the correct year


?? What makes you think satellites cannot get the correct year?


I hope I am being clear and not confusing.


Sorry, you are very confusing!



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:29 PM
link   
reply to post by hellobruce
 


well i remember learning in science that when someone goes into space they age faster then people on earth, and when they come back they look like they lost a couple years, so by that logic it seems that time is faster in space.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:38 PM
link   

neobludragon
well i remember learning in science that when someone goes into space they age faster then people on earth, and when they come back they look like they lost a couple years, so by that logic it seems that time is faster in space.


You never learnt that in Science... you seem to be confused with the Theory of Relativity
en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 12-1-2014 by hellobruce because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:42 PM
link   
reply to post by hellobruce
 


i did learn bout it in science though, or at least thats what my teacher told me. I don't remember learning bout it anywhere else. Either way though how do satellites measure that stuff correctly, it confuses me.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:43 PM
link   
reply to post by neobludragon
 


Are You trolling or are You seriously asking these questions? If You want to know then of course shame on me for calling You a troll but these kind of topics should not cause confusion, especially for people on this forum. Anyway, time differences may occur because of object or a person moving at speeds near speed of light or moving at significantly different speed than the relative object you compare it to. These weather sattelites move nowhere near the speed of light, but small time differences still occur, which are compensated by onboard atomic clocks or other devices for this purpose. Losing whole years because of this phenomenon for these sattelites is simply impossible.
Weather from space can be seen exactly as it is here on earth, only with much greater perspective. Which means that monitoring weather is much more efficient from space than from earth.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:47 PM
link   
reply to post by NoAccidents
 


Ok, and no I wasn't trolling, I don't come to these specific forums often and don't read bout weather too often either so thats why I didn't know, but thank you for explaining it to me.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:48 PM
link   

neobludragon
well i remember learning in science that when someone goes into space they age faster then people on earth, and when they come back they look like they lost a couple years, so by that logic it seems that time is faster in space.
Time slows down in a gravitational field, like Earth's gravitational field, so yes, GPS satellites can age faster than objects on the ground.

Probably what you want to google is GPS because there is a lot of info about how relativity time corrections are made. Here's one example:

Real-World Relativity: The GPS Navigation System

the clocks on-board each satellite should tick faster than identical clocks on the ground by about 38 microseconds per day


So to answer your original question, weather forecasters just ignore the microseconds per day error, because if they say there's a 40% chance of rain this afternoon, what relevance does a 38 microsecond error have to that forecast? None. If they said the rain will start between 38 microseconds after 1pm and 38 microseconds after 4pm, it would just sound silly compared to just saying it will start between 1 and 4 pm.

But it makes a big difference in GPS satellite data where a 38 microsecond error is huge, and we adjust for that (the adjustments are built into the GPS system, which you can read more about at the link, or search GPS).
edit on 12-1-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:48 PM
link   
Wow... I don't even know where to start on this thread...

Firstly, I believe you're a little off with regards to time slowing down in space. It was shown that if two clocks on earth were synchronised, and then one flown up into space to orbit the earth and come down again, the two clocks were SLIGHTLY out of sync. I'm talking fractions of a second. Satellites looking down on earth aren't looking from years in the past or future. You can google that experiment to start with, to understand what they were suggesting about the nature of time.

Secondly, satellites don't really record 'weather' per se, from space. Weather is really mostly measured and forecast using atmospheric measurements (ie. what is the temperature, is it raining, etc?). We only forecast weather by looking at PATTERNS in a range of measurements, and recalling what the weather was like when those conditions existed previously. For example, we know from tracking pressure systems what direction and intensity the wind will be. A wind coming from the ocean will being different weather to a wind coming from a dry, inland area. I hope that makes sense.

As for the rest of your post, I'm a little lost, I'm sorry...

Regards,
Rewey



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:56 PM
link   
I blame grade inflation in primary school.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 08:53 PM
link   
reply to post by neobludragon
 


Neo, I took a meteorology class back in the day and it not only bored the hell out of me, it was very in-depth and difficult. Now just because they seem to be throwing darts, doesnt mean its not based in tons of science.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join