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H7N9 has mutated, may spread from human to human: expert

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posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by six67seven
 


Almost everyone I talk to is sick, many with "the hundred day cough." The N95 is the mask you want. ...Don't live in fear but do get prepared. And remember, a little exposure goes a long, long way. So practice good hygiene.




posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by Dianec
 


...disease and viruses like the flu are our greatest rivals...


I don't mean to be contentious but do not agree that we are rivals with viruses and bacteria - it's very well known that we are composed of viruses and microbes and live in cooperation with them. They are in our guts, on our skin and in our genes. They are meant to be on us and inside us, and we are meant to live together cooperatively. Most important, viruses and microbes do reconnaissance for us when the environment changes, test-run the adaptations, and help us adapt too.


PS. Please keep posting, love your comments.



edit on 12/1/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)

edit on 12/1/14 by soficrow because: tinker



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 09:04 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


On that note, what would happen if we went to colonize another planet, and lived in some sort of biodome?

Surely, a good chunk of those microbes would be left on earth. Would that not limit our adaptive, and evolutionary potential?

Maybe weaken us?

Sorry for the tangent. Just curious.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 09:04 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Thanks.
Great charts.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 09:21 PM
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reply to post by webedoomed
 


On that note, what would happen if we went to colonize another planet, and lived in some sort of biodome?


Needs a whole new thread. But you're right - biodiversity is essential. Also, consider this - many think that we can create protective biodomes here on Earth to escape the pollution/contamination/mess we've made. Stupid when you think it through. Gotta love your tangents tho. Just not here, not now. Sorry.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Ugh, am I the only one that's starting to get confused? H7N9, H5N1 and H1N1 are getting all mixed in my ....



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by LadySkadi
 


Ugh, am I the only one that's starting to get confused? H7N9, H5N1 and H1N1 are getting all mixed in my ....


Nope. The confusion is going around. ...Just think dog breeds - they're all dogs, but different. H7N9 is the latest bird flu out of China, not quite as deadly as H5N1 and now known to spread person-to-person. H5N1 bird flu dates back a good few years - it's endemic in Asia and was hitting Cambodia hard earlier this year - and now, turned up in one case in Canada. Both H7N9 and H5N1 can affect the brain. H1N1 swine flu was pandemic in 2009 and is now in its 3rd or 4th wave.



Neurological Manifestation in New Emerging H7N9 Influenza

H5N1 Bird Flu and the Dementia Pandemic



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 10:09 PM
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Hey Sofi, I have a question you may be helpful from having read about and it's right to the heart of your topic here.

My Sister-in-Law has the flu with the household there and aside from telling me pharmacies are sold out of stuff around here for the rush of cases, whatever one she has was one the doctor said doesn't always show up on the usual test they do.

Any idea which of the strains this year that might be?



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


I remember a couple of years ago the Dutch scientific team claiming victory for developing a Bird Flu that was successful in easy transmission between humans with a high mortality rate . They were very excited and boastful . A lot of speculation about should they publish their data because of the possibilities of terrorism .
What would make them work so hard to develop the next World Wide Pandemic with such terrible consequences and at such a exceedingly great cost ? Some one had to have funded that research , but why ? The answer may be that the Globalist Elite believe that the earth is overpopulated by 80% at a minimum. Eugenics Quotes made by very rich and influential men who are Globalist Bilderberger members who have taken it upon themselves to play God with our lives comes to mind . Prince Phillip who wants to come back as a strain of the Ebola virus to kill 95 % of humanity . Or Kissinger who says the elderly are useless eaters. Of course that does not include him at 89 . Bill Gates , and David Rockefeller both spoke on population reduction .Of course that does not include the Elite .
I figured that when the antidote came out that the Dutch virus would be released in some remote country . This might be as the Swine flu 1 and 2 and the other touted pandemics a failure ,or not .
Still my question is why the Dutch team was so happy about developing their terrible pandemic ? And who funded it ?



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by SimonPeter
 


Oh come on, you can't think of a reason outside of mass killing, just cause?

When something is in existence, you can back trace it. We reverse engineer tech stolen from somewhere else all the time.

If you could track a strain's evolution on the path towards a bird flu that's highly transmissible and highly lethal, you can gain insight into it. This may be applied to a strain out in the wild with these properties.

There need be nothing else to it.

Plenty of highly lethal, and somewhat easy to transmit strains are in labs worldwide. If the "elite" wanted to off a chunk of the species, they easily could.

Please think more critically.



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 12:15 AM
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reply to post by webedoomed
 


Small Pox is the most feared and it has a 30% mortality rate . Ebola kills too quick to be effective . Surely you haven't looked at Eugenics Quotes . I do remember the Swine Flu outbreak and instant vaccine offered to combat it . You evidently haven't seen Bill Gates talking about population reduction. His live longer with vaccines and we need to reduce population video did not make sense .
Germ warfare from the military would be a possibility but it would be obvious .
Who funded that research that would be useless the study of disease prevention ? Why was it done ?



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 12:16 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


I am not aware of many good viruses. There are helpful ones (cowpox) but those aren't what I was talking about. Microbes that attack our bodies don't seem to be cooperating with us - unless it's an evolutionary matter where our bodies allow them to win sometimes as a way to balance things out. How is it that the flu, mono, shingles/chickenpox, or other such viruses are cooperative (immunity is all I can think of for the flu).

I get bacteria and other good microbes that work with our bodies. I don't see your point on deadly or destuctive ones. I'm genuinely interested in how they may be helpful to us. Perhaps making our immune systems stronger is enough but is this even happening if it's mutating beyond peoples capacity?

Edit: I looked up my own question and the reason these potentially lethal viruses (all flu has the potential to cause death), can be good for us is to stimulate immunity (knew that part), and if we allow it to run its course it can also hasten the purging of old cells to make way for new ones (infiltrates cells so when we beat it the old are replaced). The good viruses, including ones still undiscovered, are at risk of being destroyed by antivirals (good to know). Some viruses within our bodies may live within beneficial bacteria as well. Really good information that I wouldn't have looked up had it not been for your point so thank you.

It seems like it's a competition - which is the stronger. Because we continually adapt to one another (virus/host), this is actually a form of cooperation. I can see it that way, which is quite a lot more positive.
edit on 13-1-2014 by Dianec because: Added



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 12:56 AM
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reply to post by SimonPeter
 


You assume far too much. The quotes are taken far out of context. I can't believe people are taken in by such things anymore. It's just ridiculous to think about anymore.

Please come back to reality, for the sake of your loved ones.



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 06:27 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


...whatever one she has was one the doctor said doesn't always show up on the usual test they do.

Any idea which of the strains this year that might be?


No - need to know what test they're running - have to guess, but assuming your sister-in-law is in the US, they're probably focusing on H1N1 and H3N2 and not really set up to look for anything else. The 3 big strains this year are A-H1N1, A-H3N2(?) and a B strain. The B strain is least active, H1N1 is most common. (So maybe they're not testing for the B strain?)


The 2013-2014 trivalent influenza vaccine is made from the following three viruses:
an A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus;
an A(H3N2) virus antigenically like the cell-propagated prototype virus A/Victoria/361/2011;
a B/Massachusetts/2/2012-like virus.
It is recommended that the quadrivalent vaccine containing two influenza B viruses include the above three viruses and a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus.




edit on 13/1/14 by soficrow because: tnkr



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 06:40 AM
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reply to post by SimonPeter
 


Scary research is done on viruses all the time - by Big Pharma's employees to develop vaccines and treatments for profit - the research results are privately owned, protected as Intellectual Property, and they never tell anyone what they're doing. The Dutch and Wisconsin scientists wanted their research in the public domain, to be used to get a. of flu mutations, protect everyone and go beyond just profit. They were excited, but NOT boastful. You clearly do not understand science, biology OR the medical industry. You are right about the Eugenics agenda, but need a lot more information, especially about the concept of opportunistic financial strategies.

Just so you know, our planet is in a period of accelerated evolution. Viruses, bacteria and other microbes are mutating out of control. We do not need terrorists to make new strains - nature does it way better.




edit on 13/1/14 by soficrow because: tnkr



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 07:18 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


I know what you mean concerning natural immunity, and in some instances we just don't have it. I went to Texas this year in September to spend time with my daughter and was hit with what seemed like a bad cold virus. But, all I could think at the time, was that Texas grows some nasty bugs. That was the sickest I have ever been with a cold I think, which by the end had turned into pneumonia and I was in bed for a solid week after coming home... so sick I could hardly move. The kids had it too, but they got over it quicker, I figure because they were from Texas and could deal with such mean and nasty bugs easier.



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 08:04 AM
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reply to post by Dianec
 


Because we continually adapt to one another (virus/host), this is actually a form of cooperation. I can see it that way, which is quite a lot more positive.


YEA YOU!
Yes! ...More food for thought - You have described a simple equation - [Hh(human host) + V(virus) = Hh/V] - Hh/V representing the generic human's genetic profile. How 'bout adding the larger environment to the host-virus equation - [Hh(human host) + V(virus) + E(environment) = Hh/V/E], thus also adding epigenetics (gene expression) to the profile.

You know environment influences gene expression, AND that viruses and microbes adapt to environmental change much more quickly than humans (because they propagate at hyper-speed in comparison). So conceptualize a radical change, maybe a jump in radiation exposure, which initiates a series of sequential changes in the Hh/V/E equation/profile:
1. The virus responds to the environmental change, and the successful adaptation spreads through the virus community, causing the equation to shift again, creating [Hh + V + ECr13(change, radiation, 2013) = Hh/V/ECr13];
2. The adapted viruses "infect" the human host with their adaptations [Hh + VCr + E + Cr(change, radiation, 2013) = HhVCrECr2013];
3. The human host responds to the environmental change by integrating the viral adaptations via "infection" - [HhCr + VCr + ECr = HhCr/VCr/ECr].

As you can see above, the human epigenetic profile has shifted slightly in response to the environmental change (disease being an identifiable epigenetic response). Most importantly, that shift/adaptation has occurred without having to wait hundreds of years for human propagation, within a single generation and without actual genetic change. In other words, the virus played a reconnaissance role and mediated between the human host and its environment, did test runs to find mutation/adaptations that might be successful. Then, the virus acted as a mediator between the larger environment and human host, and as a messenger carrying a new adaptation for the host to try out. ...The disease-epigenetic association is undeniable. Disease is evidence of a partially successful or unsuccessful environmental adaptation, an unavoidable stage in the evolutionary process, facilitated and mediated by our invisible friends - the viruses and microbes. I would go much further and also say we most likely miss the biggest part of the story - the fact that we stay alive in this dangerous world suggests that disease is just the tip of the iceberg that is our relationship with viruses and microbes. The invisible 99% of our human-virus/microbe interaction is seamlessly successful. That's why we don't notice it so much.

[Note: One cannot accurately describe the individual as separate and distinct from the environment.]













edit on 13/1/14 by soficrow because: tnkr

edit on 13/1/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)

edit on 13/1/14 by soficrow because: tnkr



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 08:49 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


This is why I like ATS - the education. With regard to the environment - the flu virus can't replicate without a host, and can only live outside of us for a short time. Are you saying microscopic undetected changes happening within us as a response to the environment are acting on the virus to help it mutate? I don't think of much changing in my body during the cold months but can imagine there is a lot going on. My behavior changes - stay inside more so more likely to catch in closed quarters.

However - if this particular microbe can't survive outside of us for long how is the environment impacting it (and we know it does). MERS might have jumped from bats, and bats would change their behavior slightly due to the changes in addition to their food availability. I initially thought the bat deaths were due to a fungus, which is easy to see how the environment impacts. Dengue fever is more prevalent due to climate change but this is because of mosquito transmission. I hope this question makes sense.



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 09:02 AM
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Dianec
reply to post by soficrow
 


...the flu virus can't replicate without a host, and can only live outside of us for a short time.


H5N1 for example "lives" over 200 days in lake water. Some can "live" on hard surfaces for days. Smashed up virions can reassemble in the air without a host.


Are you saying microscopic undetected changes happening within us as a response to the environment are acting on the virus to help it mutate?


No. I am suggesting that microscopic undetected changes happen within us as a response to undetected infection, and the virus is helping us adapt to environmental change.


However - if this particular microbe can't survive outside of us for long how is the environment impacting it (and we know it does). ...I hope this question makes sense.


Viruses aren't microbes - but - this one does survive without a host for a good long while. Doesn't matter though - a "flash" exposure lasting just a nanosecond at the right time will cause a change/mutation. Also, WE are part of a virus's environment - so for example, the meds we take do change that environment.



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 09:34 AM
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OpinionatedB
reply to post by soficrow
 


I know what you mean concerning natural immunity, and in some instances we just don't have it.


No we don't - so-called "immunity" is an adaptive evolutionary response and it just doesn't happen unless we are exposed. I travelled a fair amount in my younger years and learned long ago that every geographic location has its own unique set of 'bugs' - part of settling in involves getting sick and developing the appropriate immunities.

You might also be interested in the info here - Deadly Flu Could Strike Aboriginal Groups Hardest.



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