Is this an Ancient Egyptian star observation tool?

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posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 10:52 AM
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I came over this ivory tusk item that's currently in the British Museum. To me it seems that the drill holes are meant as some kind of star constellation alignment and the figures are the names of the other constellations once you have the alignment correct - the curve could perhaps match the horizon. I'm imaging an priest would hold this tool at an arms lenght towards the night sky - align the holes to the correct constellation - and thereby get directions and/or the names of the nearby constellations - the rifles could perhaps even have been used to measure distance.


files.abovetopsecret.com...

In the museum it is thought to be a magical wand of sorts.

Any other theories for the use of this?

What constellation could the holes represent?

edit on 12-1-2014 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by MerkabaMeditation
 


Very interesting instrument.
I've never seen that before but I would tend to go along with what you're saying.
Those notches along the edges are curious. Maybe to track the movement of the sun/moon?



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 11:18 AM
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The three dots on the right looks suspiciously like O'Ryans belt. And since we know the egyptians were kind of obsessed with this belt......

edit on 12-1-2014 by dashen because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 11:19 AM
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I agree with you!



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by MerkabaMeditation
 


Make one of exact size and stand facing north and alight it with the "Cygnus" constellation. Then try east aligning with the Dog Star. South with the southern cross and West with the Evening star (vinus).

Let me know what you see.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 11:25 AM
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ChesterJohn
reply to post by MerkabaMeditation
 


Make one of exact size and stand facing north and alight it with the "Cygnus" constellation. Then try east aligning with the Dog Star. South with the southern cross and West with the Evening star (vinus).

Let me know what you see.

Likely wont work. It was made for latitude and longitude of egypt. Thousands of years ago. Different constellations visible/invisible.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 11:27 AM
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dashen
The three dots on the right looks suspiciously like O'Ryans belt. And since we know the egyptians were kind of obsessed with this belt......

edit on 12-1-2014 by dashen because: (no reason given)

Ahhh, you beat me to it! I was trying to upload pictures but they keep stalling.
Anyway if I had to guess the dots do represent two different constilations. One being Orion's belt as you mentioned.
The other I believe to be part of the little dipper.
I guess during different times of the year they could of used this for sailing or some other mysterious purpose.
S&F op.
Quad



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 11:47 AM
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Looks like some sort of protractor or compass. Maybe a special tool used to do some scientific pictures in the past.
edit on 12-1-2014 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by MerkabaMeditation
 


It looks similar to what I would make if I were to make a fetish for ritual shape shifting. The crescent shape promotes an evolution as does the series of depictions. You line the holes up with a constellation while in ritual (there is probably a corresponding fixed-place counterpart to this tool to line it up with, as well) and then take on the aspects of the subject in question.

It could also be used in invocation using the same methods by a shaman or summoner (or priest).

Or... it could just be a tool to track the stars.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 12:58 PM
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Most likely a magic wand. Link

Harte



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by Harte
 


Yes, as I stated in my post it is currently classified as a magical wand - I'm suggesting that perhaps it's something more/other than that.
edit on 12-1-2014 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by MerkabaMeditation
 

Before clicking on the thread I imagined a human eye looking at the night sky.

Why need a tool with holes in it to see something one can see without a tool with holes in it??



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 03:20 PM
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Where have you ever seen the horizon with that kind of wild derivation of curve?

I mean, come on. Just look at the horizon...and imagine that tusk, or whatever it is....and then think about what you are saying...



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 03:45 PM
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zeroBelief


Where have you ever seen the horizon with that kind of wild derivation of curve?

I mean, come on. Just look at the horizon...and imagine that tusk, or whatever it is....and then think about what you are saying...


It could perhaps measure the height over the horizon if not the horizon curvature - since the constallations are not on a fixed position above the horizon and also rotate above it see this timeplased image - the rifles would be used to measure the length to the horizon and they could calculate the time or date perhaps. Since the tusk is curved it could perhaps be suited for this. It's hard to visualize in writing.

edit on 12-1-2014 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 03:49 PM
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MerkabaMeditation

zeroBelief


Where have you ever seen the horizon with that kind of wild derivation of curve?

I mean, come on. Just look at the horizon...and imagine that tusk, or whatever it is....and then think about what you are saying...


It could perhaps measure the height over the horizon if not the horizon curvature - since the constallations are not on a fixed position above the horizon and also rotate above it see this timeplased image - the rifles would be used to measure the length to the horizon and they could calculate the time or date perhaps. Since the tusk is curved it could perhaps be suited for this. It's hard to visualize in writing.

edit on 12-1-2014 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)



So, is that to say that the celestial observation is to take place below the horizon?



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 03:50 PM
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Chamberf=6
reply to post by MerkabaMeditation
 

Before clicking on the thread I imagined a human eye looking at the night sky.

Why need a tool with holes in it to see something one can see without a tool with holes in it??


For alignment with a specific constillation, just like you use a ruler when you need to measure something - you align it to the thing you want to measure.
edit on 12-1-2014 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 04:00 PM
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zeroBelief

MerkabaMeditation

zeroBelief


Where have you ever seen the horizon with that kind of wild derivation of curve?

I mean, come on. Just look at the horizon...and imagine that tusk, or whatever it is....and then think about what you are saying...


It could perhaps measure the height over the horizon if not the horizon curvature - since the constallations are not on a fixed position above the horizon and also rotate above it see this timeplased image - the rifles would be used to measure the length to the horizon and they could calculate the time or date perhaps. Since the tusk is curved it could perhaps be suited for this. It's hard to visualize in writing.

edit on 12-1-2014 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)


So, is that to say that the celestial observation is to take place below the horizon?



No, it's not easy to visualize for everyone - but Imagine holding the tool at arms length in aligned with the Dog Star constillation - in such a way that each star can be seen though the corrosponding drill hole in the tool. At 1 AM and observing that rifle number #10 from left touches the horizon, then at 2 AM the constillation will have moved and rotated abit and you would need to readjust the tool to align it to the Dog star constillation again - so that you rotate it and move it a bit to accommodate the changed position and rotation of the constillation. You now observe that rifle number #11 from the left touches the horizon. From this you have a simple clock where you know that rifle #10 means 1 AM at this time of year and rifle #11 means it's 2 AM. This is just a simple postulation attempt of its usage though, perhaps it's was used in the same manner to tell the seasons?

edit on 12-1-2014 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 04:06 PM
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MerkabaMeditation
reply to post by Harte
 


Yes, as I stated in my post it is currently classified as a magical wand - I'm suggesting that perhaps it's something more/other than that.
edit on 12-1-2014 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)


These things were found in tombs with accompanying texts containing magical spells, things like warding off evil spirits, etc., not astrological information.

The relief drawings on them are of known evil and good spirits/gods.

Egyptology didn't just find them, not know what they are, and then "decide" to call it a wand.

Again, most likely a magic wand.

Harte



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 04:10 PM
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Harte
Egyptology didn't just find them, not know what they are, and then "decide" to call it a wand.


Reclassification of archaeological objects happens all the time and is not unusual with science. Also, as I mentioned in my original post - it might be a wand and have some other function, so I'm not excluding it being a wand.
edit on 12-1-2014 by MerkabaMeditation because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 04:37 PM
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possible a lunar calender of sorts, it could have enough of the markings on the outside to indicate days of the Egyptian month (30) if you allow for the repair. need a better res image to see if if those outer markings are actually numbers or just scrapes. the holes may align with lunar events?





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