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Subsurface Water Ice And Chances For Present Life on Mars

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posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 03:57 AM
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wildespace
reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


"No, liquid water on Mars is impossible." - You replied to a post about underground reserves of frozen water which, under certain conditions, may stay liquid. No one is talking about oceans of water splashing around on Mars.


Quite right. I am so used to hearing people talk non stop about above ground water on Mars. I don't see this scenario as likely .. but possible as there is not enough information to disprove it.

ETA:In my defense the responses to my post were all about surface water flows .. which is what I am used to hearing on ATS.
edit on 12-1-2014 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 10:22 AM
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wildespace
reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


"No, liquid water on Mars is impossible." - You replied to a post about underground reserves of frozen water which, under certain conditions, may stay liquid. No one is talking about oceans of water splashing around on Mars.

Thanks for the clarification, wildespace ... that was more or less what I and others were getting at with our previous posts.

If there is water ice buried in the ground (away from the poles) and if there are seasonal (temporary) streaks of saltwater on the surface in areas with higher temperatures, then the chemical reactions between rocks & water 'underground' (--> protection from radiation) could well result in a fertile environment for extremophile organisms IMO.



posted on Jan, 12 2014 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by jeep3r
 


The only problem with that is that it appears those conditions would not be conducive to life starting in any way we have found plausible. So the odds of that being the case would be highly unlikely. Until we check it can't be ruled out though.



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


One could think that any extremophile organisms on Mars today would be the surviving remains of a previous and much older ecosystem. Even if most of that was lost over time, they might still live in their niche today feeding on energy from chemical reactions underground. But would they really require such an 'older' ecosystem to evolve in the first place? I don't know and it's hard to tell.

At this point it's really just a thought experiment without hard evidence, but IMO the chances for discovering primitive organisms beneath the surface are better than ever before when considering the information compiled in this thread up to now ...
edit on 13-1-2014 by jeep3r because: text



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by jeep3r
 


There is a good chance I would say that mars could have some Micro organisms living there. And if it does it has HUGE value.

But it wont be more than Micro organisms so dont hold your breath for little green men.



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 03:57 PM
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crazyewok
reply to post by jeep3r
 


There is a good chance I would say that mars could have some Micro organisms living there. And if it does it has HUGE value.

But it wont be more than Micro organisms


What a find that would be though!

So many theories about extraterrestrial life could be tested including panspermia if it turns out that Mars microbes and Earth microbes are closely related genetically.
edit on 13-1-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 13 2014 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by JadeStar
 


Your deffinatly right it would be the find of a century. At least for us that live in geek land :p

Europa is my favorite target though,
edit on 13-1-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



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