Size does matter: The Sun

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posted on Jan, 9 2014 @ 10:33 PM
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I was looking at the size of our Sun relative to some other Stars, and the size of some Stars is mind boggling. I may be wrong in my assumption but I think that some Stars would take an entire lifetime to cross their diameters with current rocket technology. For example, the radius our of Sun is approximately 695,500 kilometers, or 432,450 miles. However, the radius of Caynis Majoris, the largest Star on record, is 1,420 solar masses. That's 1,420x the size of our sun. There are other stars more massive than Canis Majoris however their true size(s) are uncertain, so Canis Majoris gets the nod as the largest.

The universe is so big that I think you could never see it all in one lifetime.

What say you, ATS?

en.wikipedia.org...




posted on Jan, 9 2014 @ 10:36 PM
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Yep I know this type of thing gets brought up every now and again but it's like one of those "Wow" moments that you just can't stay away from especially when you see the comparison videos or even charts that are online - -

www.youtube.com...

I sometimes would like to see some of these things with my own eyes instead of just the artists renditions and scientific apparatuses that allow us to see them.



posted on Jan, 9 2014 @ 10:42 PM
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reply to post by MystiqueAgent
 


I agree. It's nothing new but jaw dropping nonetheless. I wish that I could see with my own eyes too. Unfortunately, our Space travel technology moves at a snail's pace. Hopefully, competition from the private industry and other countries will change all of that.



posted on Jan, 9 2014 @ 10:49 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


the universe?as far as i know it is 100.000 light years across for our galaxy alone,theres trillions of galaxys,it is beyond our comprehension the size of the universe.



posted on Jan, 9 2014 @ 10:55 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


Well, the Galaxy, just our galaxy mind you, and just an average sized galaxy at that would take over 12,000 years to explore if you could travel instantaneously in a blink through teleportation and stayed just ONE SECOND at each star.

If you could do the same for every star in the entire Universe, if you could instantly teleport with zero travel time to every single star in all of the known Universe, and only spent one second at each star, it would take well over Hundreds of Trillions of times longer than the Universe itself is currently old.

So, in essence, the entirety of the Universe as we currently know it, from big-bang, or whatever, to now, could happen many more times than hundreds of Trillions of times over before you finished a survey of every star in the Universe by visiting each one for only one second.

Now, add to that a more realistic means of travel than instant teleportation; travel that actually takes some time to get from point A to point B, and add to that at least a little bit more time to admire the sights than just a single second, and the times to explore just a Galaxy, much less the Entire Universe start looking more like they'd require time travel and immortality just to be done properly.



edit on 1/9/2014 by AliceBleachWhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2014 @ 10:59 PM
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S&F because it hurts my Brain to attempt and comprehend such immense size....could that mean that super sized earths 1,420x ours exist? And super sized humanoids?



posted on Jan, 9 2014 @ 11:01 PM
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Interesting little titbit about the sun. This is something I tell all people who start to talk about the sun and ponder its significance/insignificance.

In the Milkyway galaxy approximately 95% by number of all stars are cooler (thus redder), smaller (goes with the colour to some extent). The sun has a high metallically in comparison with the local group, meaning it is a 2nd or 3rd generation star. Also something like 80% of all bright stars (like the sun and brighter) are parts of multiple gravitationally bound systems, Binaries, Trinaries.... etc. The sun is alone, so it is not rare but its certainly not the norm.

So there you go, although some of the largest stars known, would make the sun look extremely small, the Sun in itself statistically is quite unusual.




posted on Jan, 9 2014 @ 11:05 PM
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AliceBleachWhite
reply to post by lostbook
 


Well, the Galaxy, just our galaxy mind you, and just an average sized galaxy at that would take over 12,000 years to explore if you could travel instantaneously in a blink through teleportation and stayed just ONE SECOND at each star.

If you could do the same for every star in the entire Universe, if you could instantly teleport with zero travel time to every single star in all of the known Universe, and only spent one second at each star, it would take well over Hundreds of Trillions of times longer than the Universe itself is currently old.

So, in essence, the entirety of the Universe as we currently know it, from big-bang, or whatever, to now, could happen many more times than hundreds of Trillions of times over before you finished a survey of every star in the Universe by visiting each one for only one second.

Now, add to that a more realistic means of travel than instant teleportation; travel that actually takes some time to get from point A to point B, and add to that at least a little bit more time to admire the sights than just a single second, and the times to explore just a Galaxy, much less the Entire Universe start looking more like they'd require time travel and immortality just to be done properly.



edit on 1/9/2014 by AliceBleachWhite because: (no reason given)
where are you getting 12,000 years?our galaxy from 1 end to the other is 100.000 light years so even going in blink of an eye would still take you about a 100.000 years.



posted on Jan, 9 2014 @ 11:08 PM
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It is pretty mind boggling, isn't it?

Now consider this one along with the star size? If the planets which might support life are in scale to their stars ...and that life is in scale to it's planet size and relative things like gravity?

Goodness... Our first contact with a UFO is always thought to be something relative in size to our own craft and aircraft or something "big" like Stargate depictions or the Enterprise in Star Trek. All man scale "big"....

We could see our "First Contact" with another civilization flying in a ship larger than our planet just because in their radically different star system, that's relative normal..
edit on 9-1-2014 by Wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 12:10 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


or... exactly the opposite. Wouldnt that be funnier? Extremely small men, about 1 inch high driving small spaceships, the size of those 1/43 collectors cars... with the power to annihilate a planet!



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 12:32 AM
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FraternitasSaturni
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


or... exactly the opposite. Wouldnt that be funnier? Extremely small men, about 1 inch high driving small spaceships, the size of those 1/43 collectors cars... with the power to annihilate a planet!


I'll take that thought a little further.

What of they were 1/43rd our size, but only capable of destroying planets also of that scale. I think it would be comical to attempt to have a serious conversation with an alien life form with a super-inflated sense of their own power.



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 12:50 AM
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sparky31
where are you getting 12,000 years?our galaxy from 1 end to the other is 100.000 light years so even going in blink of an eye would still take you about a 100.000 years.


Um.
Teleporting in an instant would ignore light speed and distance.

Now, how did I arrive at over 12,000 years with instant teleportation?

Observe:

An average sized Spiral Galaxy, like our own, has about 400 - 500 BILLION stars.
We'll use the low number just to be conservative, so, 400,000,000,000 stars.

Spending only one second at each star (with zero travel time to each one; instant teleport travel) = 400,000,000,000 seconds.

How many minutes would that be?
Divide 400,000,000,000 by 60 = 6666666666.666667
hmmm, that's still ambiguous looking so, how many hours would that be?
6666666666.666667 divided by 60 = 111111111.1111111
eh. Still a bit ambiguous.
Days? divide by 24 for each hour in a day, right?
4629629.62962963. That a lot of days and still a little ambiguous looking.
Let's divide by 365 for days in a year ...
12683.91679350583

Rounding up, we then get 12,684 years to tour a Galaxy consisting of 400 Billion stars.
Rounding down to the ten thousands, we can say 12,000 years.

See how that works?

With instant teleportation, and visiting each star for only one second each, it'd still take someone well over 120 lifetimes.

Now, if we were limited to light speed travel, with all the crisscrossing, and pin-balling to each and every star with the average distance between each star being about 5 light years between each one, it would take 5 x 400 Billion years + that little 12,000 years if you like to explore our Galaxy as a single individual.

That's 2,000,000,012,000, or Two Trillion years by the way ... which is about 145 times longer than the current age of the Universe.

That's just ONE Average sized Galaxy too.

Suffice to say, the Universe is quite vast.

As stated before, to properly explore the Universe, one would need be immortal, and have a Space-Time Machine because, the Universe is also not static. It's changing all the time, and even the very fastest methods of travel imagined, like teleportation couldn't even keep up with the changes of the Universe over time if even one second were spent at each star.



edit on 1/10/2014 by AliceBleachWhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 12:57 AM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...

I've created a thread not so long ago. Please enjoy ?



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 01:10 AM
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FraternitasSaturni
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


or... exactly the opposite. Wouldnt that be funnier? Extremely small men, about 1 inch high driving small spaceships, the size of those 1/43 collectors cars... with the power to annihilate a planet!


There was something kinda comical/similar in the Hitchhikers guide to the galaxy book, but I'm not sure if it was in the movie. From what I remember there was a tiny tiny space fairing alien race we some how offended with our radio signals when they reached their planet so they came to annihilate earth. BUT when they finally made it to our solar system one of our satellites or something like that was so huge compared to them that gravity pulled em into it like a bug hitting a windshield thus ending a galactic war we never even knew about... I'm not 100% sure that's exactly how it went because it's Been years since I read that book but that was the gist of the joke.
edit on 10-1-2014 by NewsWorthy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 01:18 AM
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reply to post by lostbook
 




The universe is so big that I think you could never see it all in one lifetime.

What say you, ATS?


I'd guess that it will be many lifetimes before we will be even able to comprehend the enormity of the Universe.

Check this out... it takes you from 0.0000000001 yoctometer, to the outer reaches of the observable Universe.

Scale of the Universe







edit on 10-1-2014 by Perhaps because: fix stuff



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 01:39 AM
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reply to post by ErosA433
 


Betlegeuse, is a red super giant. It's cooler than our sun, but larger than our solar system's entirety.

Color, goes along with temperature, but it does not go along with size. In fact as our star cools, it will expand, and become less dense.



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 01:40 AM
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reply to post by lostbook
 




However, the radius of Caynis Majoris, the largest Star on record, is 1,420 solar masses. That's 1,420x the size of our sun.


WOW...talk about 'alternate dimensions!' Wonder how big its planets are?

And now I wonder if there are tiny, even microscopic suns in our Universe. Why not?!



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 01:44 AM
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reply to post by Lipton
 


Isn't it funnier to think we are 43 times there size, and only a select few have limited access to the power to destroy, %.000001 of a planet our size.

I actually find that much funnier, and a being smaller than us from a planet larger than ours would make sense. Think of places like Jupiter and it's moons were the gravity can be so intense it literally destroys objects that would exist perfectly on our planet.

A planet much more massive than ours, with a star far beyond our comprehension would make sense to develop life forms of shorter, stockier builds.



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 05:08 AM
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sparky31
where are you getting 12,000 years?our galaxy from 1 end to the other is 100.000 light years so even going in blink of an eye would still take you about a 100.000 years.


Erm no.

Its not very light year in a linear direction.

Its every star! And theres 400 billion stars!
edit on 10-1-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 10 2014 @ 05:12 AM
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By the way about life in systems with super massive stars.

Theres a big problem, the super massive stars are very short lived. Chances are too short lived for life to develope before the star goes nova.
edit on 10-1-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)





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