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Aviation fuel quality seminars

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posted on Jan, 6 2014 @ 08:38 PM
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In Dubai or Singapore in February - perhaps someone whio is concerned about the possibility of additives to aviation fuel causing "chemtrails" might like to consider attending one of these or something similar??

These seminars are going to address the forthcoming fuel quality standard EI/JIG 1530 -


EI/JIG 1530 provides a standard to assist in the maintenance of aviation fuel quality, from its point of manufacture through (sometimes complex) distribution systems to airports. It provides mandatory provisions and good practice recommendations for the design/functional requirements of facilities, and operational procedures.

EI/JIG 1530 is intended for adoption worldwide, by any company or organisation involved in the refining, storage or handling of aviation fuel upstream of airports. This includes those companies/organisations responsible for the design, construction, operation, inspection or maintenance of refineries, pipelines, marine vessels, coastal/inland waterway barges, road tankers, rail tank cars or storage installations, and aviation fuel testing laboratories and inspection companies.

The need for the management of aviation fuel quality throughout the supply chain has been recognized by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), which has issued Doc 9977 Manual on civil aviation jet fuel supply to the civil aviation authorities of the 191 Member States of ICAO. EI/JIG 1530 is included in the ICAO Manual as a key reference.


Check also this short slide presentation EI/JIG 1530 - a refiners perspective - you may be interested in "Control of “Incidental” and “Adventitious” materials (Section 6.4)" on page 5......




posted on Jan, 6 2014 @ 10:37 PM
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Well, it appears chlorides are listed as normal additives. Certain chlorides are used for cloud seeding, I wonder if a chemical chloride compound, utilizing normal jet fuel as the other part, will cause cloud like formations.



Naw, that would be to cheap and simple.



posted on Jan, 6 2014 @ 10:57 PM
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rickymouse
Well, it appears chlorides are listed as normal additives. Certain chlorides are used for cloud seeding, I wonder if a chemical chloride compound, utilizing normal jet fuel as the other part, will cause cloud like formations.



Naw, that would be to cheap and simple.


Certain chlorides are used for making my french fries salty too. I see they use salts for drying but I don't see it listed as an additive.


Salt dryers are used to remove water from fuel as an integral step in certain refinery
processes. A salt dryer comprises a bed of granular rock salt, NaCl, (although calcium
chloride or a mixture of the two is sometimes used) emplaced in a vessel. Its function is to
remove free water entrained in a hydrocarbon product as well as small amounts of dissolved
water. It is installed upstream of a product clay filter to protect the clay from premature failure
due to free water attack on the crystalline clay structure.


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Given that kerosene is a non-polar solvent and is pretty useless at dissolving salts I can't see it being very easy to mix either with the homogeneity standards that are found in other parts of the regulations.


Nonpolar solvents like ethanol are not as good at hydrating ions. They have more favorable interactions with other nonpolar molecules than with ions and so do not dissolve salts.


Polar and non-polar solubility

Of course, many polar solvents are mildly soluble in non-polar, which is why you get something called "anhydrous _______" after drying it with salts. The salts can later be heated (water evaporated) and used again for this process. (Among other drying processes.)



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