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Curiosity: Potential Anomalies (Update 01/2014)

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posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 05:54 PM
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ArMaP
reply to post by jeep3r
 

To me it looks like what we see on the ground is the shadow of small rocks next to the shadow of the bigger rock.


Probably just a shadowplay, yes ... it's always helpful to have a second pair of eyes crosschecking something like that. Thanks!




posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by funbox
 


That looks like a lake if you see the light as coming from the wrong direction, that's a "mesa".

In the image below the arrow shows the direction of the light.




posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


so those little dots at the bottom of the picture in a line are not Post for docking luxury mars yachts ?

dam , there goes my holiday plans

funBox



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 06:38 PM
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funbox
so those little dots at the bottom of the picture in a line are not Post for docking luxury mars yachts ?

dam , there goes my holiday plans

Unless you like holidays on ice, that's close to the south pole.



posted on Mar, 6 2014 @ 06:42 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


ill be ok , I have a huge pack of wolves, special ones that have nitrogen based blood , its haemoglobin is shaped liked a sixteen pointed star , you should see it under the electron , of course no pics, ;D but the wolves are very insistant on that


but I will pack my extra thermals
thx for the advice


funBox



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 02:28 PM
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an odd looking shadow , it appears deeper and blacker than the others, not sure how its occurring , any explanations?




mast 562

funBox



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by funbox
 


Probably a result of lack of light reflect by other rocks and the ground, you can see that most shadows are not that dark because they are getting reflected light. The large rock on the left side of the photo, just above the one you enlarged, also has a darker shadow in a small area, probably by the same reason.



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


I agree ArMaP , radiosity plays apart in all lighting setups , but to what extent? how would that patch be excluded from all other reflected photons it looks like a mini black hole has appeared
, ill check the picture again and ramp up the levels



exposure was ramped heavily, and its still notably different

funBox
edit on 7-3-2014 by funbox because: w



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 04:26 PM
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ArMaP
That looks like a lake if you see the light as coming from the wrong direction, that's a "mesa".
In the image below the arrow shows the direction of the light.

If you can dig up the original image from which that crop was obtained, it becomes much clearer that the "water" opens up into a flat area and it has no shoreline to stop it. It also helps to look at it upside down to see what's really going on there.



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


not sure what shoreline you mean MrBlueShift , the shoreline next to the jetty ?

how are you guys getting a fix for the light source and direction ? all the landscape around this feature looks like a spider web of forests to me , can you show me where to get the angles here ?


funBox



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:17 PM
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funbox
how are you guys getting a fix for the light source and direction ? all the landscape around this feature looks like a spider web of forests to me , can you show me where to get the angles here ?

Here's a different angle of it that might give your brain a better chance to see what's really happening here. The sunlight is coming from the top. So rather than a depression with water in it, it's actually more like a flattened out blob on top of the ground.



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


Here is the page for that image.



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:22 PM
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ArMaP
reply to post by Blue Shift
 

Here is the page for that image.

Hah. Beat you to it.



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:24 PM
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funbox
how are you guys getting a fix for the light source and direction ?

The page for that image has that information:

Sun azimuth: 51.23°

If you click on the "Sun azimuth" (or any other name on that values list) you can read this:

In a raw or unprocessed MOC image, this is the angle in degrees clockwise from a line drawn from the center to the right edge of the image to the direction of the sun at the time the image was acquired. This number allows the user to determine "which way is the sun coming from in my image?"
For images that have been map-projected so that north is to the top of the frame, the sun azimuth can be determined relative to north by subtracting the north azimuth from the sun azimuth. The resulting number (positive clockwise) gives the sun azimuth relative to the top of the frame.

Also, for "North azimuth":

In a raw or unprocessed MOC image, this is the angle in degrees clockwise from a line drawn from the center to the right edge of the image to the direction of the north pole of Mars. This number allows the user to determine "which way is north/south? and which way is east/west?"



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


But you didn't post the uncropped image.



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Are you surprised
, I posted it in the posting of the crop I did earlier ..

it just looks so featureless , a mesa , in that frozen tundra ,exposed above the surrounding terrain, no erosion giving surface features... smells a bit unlikely to me

funBox



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:37 PM
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ArMaP
But you didn't post the uncropped image.

It's too big!



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:40 PM
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funbox
it just looks so featureless , a mesa , in that frozen tundra ,exposed above the surrounding terrain, no erosion giving surface features... smells a bit unlikely to me

I see it as a kind of sandy slush that relatively recently leaked out from underneath the area at the bottom left of the image, and then froze in that spot. "Recently," like 10,000 years ago.



edit on 7-3-2014 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:45 PM
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ArMaP

funbox
how are you guys getting a fix for the light source and direction ?

The page for that image has that information:

Sun azimuth: 51.23°

If you click on the "Sun azimuth" (or any other name on that values list) you can read this:

In a raw or unprocessed MOC image, this is the angle in degrees clockwise from a line drawn from the center to the right edge of the image to the direction of the sun at the time the image was acquired. This number allows the user to determine "which way is the sun coming from in my image?"
For images that have been map-projected so that north is to the top of the frame, the sun azimuth can be determined relative to north by subtracting the north azimuth from the sun azimuth. The resulting number (positive clockwise) gives the sun azimuth relative to the top of the frame.

Also, for "North azimuth":

In a raw or unprocessed MOC image, this is the angle in degrees clockwise from a line drawn from the center to the right edge of the image to the direction of the north pole of Mars. This number allows the user to determine "which way is north/south? and which way is east/west?"


cheers ArMaP, I thought you had added the arrow from a determination made from ground feature shadows , or maybe the moss growing on them martians tree surrounding the lake like object, that has an unusual jetty like posting along its gradual, low angled, sloping shoreline


its amazing what can be missed


had any more thoughts on you know what ?

funBox



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


you mean like a briny slush ? this might be very useful in preserving of all them Martian molluscs we could catch off them jetties .. but if it was ouzing what is capturing it in that shape , surely there would be overspill

anyone know how briny this water on mars gets , and is there an upper limit to dissolving salt in water ? would the atmospheric pressure have bearing on this upper limit?

or , how cold can we take briny water? does it have an upper limit/saturation point , and if not how would we see this appearance on mars at different latitudes/temperature zones ?


funBox



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