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Curiosity: Potential Anomalies (Update 01/2014)

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posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 12:31 PM
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Phage
reply to post by Char-Lee
 




What is on the bottom of that rock?

If you read the link to the very old thread I posted (and if you read a few more posts) you would have seen that it was glass.

I know, your next question would be "Glass? Where would glass come from?"
Before you do:
www.lpi.usra.edu...


edit on 2/4/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



Thank you for your response and great information Phage. The droplets do not look like glass but that is not the reason I am of the belief that there is liquid water on Mars, I believe we do not understand the processes on Mars nor the possible changes that take place in water to remain stable in low atmosphere.
I think things are far from sure in any area of science and I simply have an intuition that tells me there is water, it mostly will be under the ground in pools during times of melt, but some will be seeping constantly enough to show water on the surface.

No need to argue the point I know it is outside Known science (basically crazy talk) but I don't see science as infallible nor their conclusions unchangeable, nor do I believe they tell us the whole truth of things.




posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 12:34 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


No, you are correct. At certain times of year, at Mars locations, you can see the water leaving flow channels (I don't remember the name of any threads or data on this besides recalling the photographic comparisons between the water flow and when it doesn't flow). So get on your bathing suit, grab your beach ball, and let's all head to Mars!



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


interesting .. how does water flow , if the atmospheres too thin to support it, would the Martian seasons create denser pockets of air in certain regions allowing the water to congregate/pool on the surface? what would be the sweet spot temperature be to keep it in liquid form ?
and how does water become mineral bound? is that on an elemental level? would be interested to seeing the maths of that


funBox
edit on 5-2-2014 by funbox because: of ...



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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kinda odd this shot. looks like predawn with many artifacts/pinpoints of light , I thought it might be a longer exposure shot and they are stars , but they cannot all be stars , as they extend into the land, peculiar. I don't recognise any constellations either .



sol529



funBOx
edit on 5-2-2014 by funbox because: ..



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 03:38 PM
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funbox
reply to post by Aleister
 


interesting .. how does water flow , if the atmospheres too thin to support it, would the Martian seasons create denser pockets of air in certain regions allowing the water to congregate/pool on the surface? what would be the sweet spot temperature be to keep it in liquid form ?
and how does water become mineral bound? is that on an elemental level? would be interested to seeing the maths of that


funBox
edit on 5-2-2014 by funbox because: of ...



Dark, finger-like features appear and extend down some Martian slopes during late spring through summer, fade in winter, and return during the next spring. Repeated observations have tracked the seasonal changes in these recurring features on several steep slopes in the middle latitudes of Mars' southern hemisphere.

"The best explanation for these observations so far is the flow of briny water


www.nasa.gov...



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 03:41 PM
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funbox
kinda odd this shot. looks like predawn with many artifacts/pinpoints of light , I thought it might be a longer exposure shot and they are stars , but they cannot all be stars , as they extend into the land, peculiar. I don't recognise any constellations either.

Maybe they noticed all the dust accumulating on the lenses and wanted to get an idea as to where they are. So this would be a negative image, highlighting the dust.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


As far as Mars



PASADENA, Calif. -- Observations from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have revealed possible flowing water during the warmest months on Mars.


Flowing must mean liquid and as it can be seen "flowing" it is on the surface. Personally I believe there are pools. We are made of water like the water in our particular sea, I would figure creatures would evolve to compatable with water which is quit different than ours and yet sill water.

www.nasa.gov...



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


ahh, a bias file, kinda like you would if you was stacking 200 pictures , and wanted to remove the noise accumulated on the lens.. gotcha


funBOx



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 03:46 PM
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funbox
kinda odd this shot. looks like predawn with many artifacts/pinpoints of light , I thought it might be a longer exposure shot and they are stars , but they cannot all be stars , as they extend into the land, peculiar. I don't recognise any constellations either .



sol529



funBOx
edit on 5-2-2014 by funbox because: ..


Hum the mountain is not real!



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 03:54 PM
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Char-Lee
The droplets do not look like glass but that is not the reason I am of the belief that there is liquid water on Mars, I believe we do not understand the processes on Mars nor the possible changes that take place in water to remain stable in low atmosphere.

The process that it impossible for water to flow on an atmosphere as thin as in Mars is well known, it's the same that makes it cooking at high altitudes different from cooking at sea level.

High Altitude Food Preparation

I remember reading one or more book(s) where an explorer used the temperature at which the water boiled as a way of knowing the altitude.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 03:55 PM
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Aleister
At certain times of year, at Mars locations, you can see the water leaving flow channels (I don't remember the name of any threads or data on this besides recalling the photographic comparisons between the water flow and when it doesn't flow).

In the thousands of photos from Mars I have seen I have never seen any thing like that.

Too bad you don't remember any reference.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 03:59 PM
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funbox
kinda odd this shot. looks like predawn with many artifacts/pinpoints of light , I thought it might be a longer exposure shot and they are stars , but they cannot all be stars , as they extend into the land, peculiar. I don't recognise any constellations either .


It's most likely a long exposure, but that's noise on the sensor, the longer the exposure the more noisy the photo gets, that happens with all digital cameras.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 04:00 PM
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Char-Lee
Flowing must mean liquid and as it can be seen "flowing" it is on the surface.

The problem is that nobody has seen that happening, if they witness it happening then maybe they can analyse it, and then know if it's water or not.



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


indeed , but usually you would leave the lens cap on before taking a bias, do they have that ability on the cam?.. here's a gif illustrating their fixedish position's



funBox



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 04:13 PM
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funbox
indeed , but usually you would leave the lens cap on before taking a bias, do they have that ability on the cam?..

No.


here's a gif illustrating their fixedish position's


Is that made with photos from just one camera?



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


both right and left, hence the two different fixed patterns , erm why your here ArMaP , you got a good link to a science site that describes in depth the water/atmosphere scenario on mars?

funBox



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


looks kinda surreal
but I think its one of the ridges

funBox



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Here you are armap www.universetoday.com...



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by symptomoftheuniverse
 


from the article



Regarding the dark color of the flows, McEwen added, “The flows are not dark because of being wet, they are dark for some other reason.” McEwen also mentioned that researchers will need to re-create Mars-like conditions in the lab to better understand these flows, stating, “It’s a mystery now, but I think it’s a solvable mystery with further observations and laboratory experiments.”


briny wet behind the ears , occums razor would suggest that the darkening would be caused by saturation therby lowering the light index reflectivity/absorbtion of the surface, sheesh


funBOx
edit on 5-2-2014 by funbox because: of hoooooowl



posted on Feb, 5 2014 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by funbox
 

Its either water or guano,still no one has seen liquid water on the surface.
Some more images www.extremetech.com...

edit on 5-2-2014 by symptomoftheuniverse because: (no reason given)



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