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Curiosity: Potential Anomalies (Update 01/2014)

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posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 03:08 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
if only they thought to pack a mic , we would be able to hear the little buggers chuckling and running away whilst holding their blue noses ..

I think they did that with the Phoenix lander, but the microphone malfunctioned and they were not able to get any data from it, if I'm not mistaken.




posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: [post=18773051]ArMaP[/post

shame they gave up trying , as scientists they should know the value from environmental audio scapes, the sound of sublimating water at sunrise , the subtle breathing of the wind , weak and asthmatic as it said to be , the sounds made by rovers operations as it interacts with the surface, the subtle or brazen noises made by escaping gasses, and all those other unknown noises an unexplored environment can generate

quite frankly I don't believe for a second there isn't one up there
lets hear the noise..

funbox

edit on 16-12-2014 by funbox because: it does it again



posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
quite frankly I don't believe for a second there isn't one up there
lets hear the noise..

From what I understand, standing on Mars and listening with your human ears in the thin C02 air without any assistance is basically going to sound like barely audible high-frequency hiss. You'll probably hear the blood flowing in your own ears louder than any actual sounds coming from the environment.



posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

air dense enough to carry 2 microns sand grains , but not sound waves, sounds interesting mr Shift , how does this arrangement of melody's work? , does CO2 prefer the more manual to the musical ?, and why don't the rest of the gasses chip in ? noble or otherwise


editadd

been looking for sounds , heres some hypotheticals courtesy of the daily mail

www.dailymail.co.uk...
and the mars polar lander

mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

some more bullcrap to fill the unknown quantity *don't panic Nasa*


One of the rover's unique instruments – the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) – has set about sniffing the makeup of Mars's atmosphere. Unexpected traces of methane – a possible signature of life – in first sample of gas caused great excitement back on Earth … until it was realised that a small amount of gas from Earth had been carried to Mars inside the instrument.


sights sounds and sniffing mars

still heard nothing from that article ... next

the dodgy looking mic attached to phoenix

get ready to listen to nothing

this site has hypothetical bagpipes on mars!

bagpipe site

bagpipes on mars mp3

sounds kinda catchy albeit hypothetically so



However, while the sound on Titan carries even better than it does on Earth, on Mars the atmosphere absorbs the sound so much that almost nothing is audible when you are only 20 meters from the organ. The calculations indicate what the instrument would sound like at various locations in open — ‘air’ — concert halls on the various planets. One thing’s for sure — you wouldn’t sell many tickets on Mars!”


a range of 20 metres is a fair environment to explore with a mic , this could probably be enhanced further via modulation , processing

the whole issue rings a bit like a dead jade rabbit


edit again to add , Hold on a sec, "Absorb sound?" how thick does the atmos have to be to do that ? a special property of carbon dioxide perhaps?


funbox
edit on 16-12-2014 by funbox because: howling wolves go silent as a mfb starts the pump
edit on 16-12-2014 by funbox because: an atmosphere a brewing



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 12:58 AM
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originally posted by: funbox
air dense enough to carry 2 microns sand grains , but not sound waves, sounds interesting mr Shift , how does this arrangement of melody's work? , does CO2 prefer the more manual to the musical ?, and why don't the rest of the gasses chip in ? noble or otherwise

I think this explains it better than I can:
cosmiclog.nbcnews.com...



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 05:44 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

not really Mr Shift , still Vague


He said the situation would be different on Mars. "The lower sound speed on Mars does not lower the pitch of the voice," Leighton told me in a follow-up email. "It makes the speaker seem slightly larger, but still in pitch. In fact, the atmosphere of Mars would raise the pitch of the speaker's voice slightly, because of a density effect."


"because of a density effect"

density of what ? a thin atmosphere... how very scientifically explained


funbox



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 06:09 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

As folks discuss the extent, volume, and pitch of sounds on Mars audible to the human ear (put Sinead O'Connor up there and then you've got a concert to write to Earth about) let's not lose sight of the antenna thing that you recently found. Is there a geological explanation of what kind of rock that could be (or soil structure, or geode, or ....) And have you all noticed that there is a geologist posting about and around ATS? He or she showed up on another thread, and maybe they can explain the type of geological forces which would make the symmetrical "antenna" on your find.



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 07:31 AM
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a reply to: Aleister

there's a geologist on here and you haven't hunted them down and chained them to this thread ? ,you're not losing the touch are you Aleister ?


need the harpoon gun ?

whilst your at it see if you can get an expert on exo-atmospherics.

funbox



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 07:42 AM
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a reply to: funbox

We should be able to offer a geologist lots of posts to ponder, debunk, or 'muh' over. But he or she or it should be guided to things which are of possible interest without having to go through all ten pages of this thread (although they may love to start at the beginning and work through the year - Jan 1st is the first anniversary of this continuing adventure). I'll try to find the post where the geologist raises his (her, or its) hand.

EDIT: Well, maybe I misread. A geology student (wonder if the poster is actually a institutional student or a self-styled student, i.e. I am a self-styled student on how not to make money, but was a real journalism student at one point), not yet a full-fledge geologist. Writes up a good post though: www.abovetopsecret.com... (I've sent a U2U with a tape of U2 and a link to the antenna post).

edit on 17-12-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)
edit on 17-12-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: Aleister

a kinda top ten of the Potential anomalies thread ... not a bad idea , but how do we come to the conclusion of the top ten, some kind of voting ? I vote spokey thing to be up there in the top five , a great one from Buzz , also fond of Symptoms, gurning head , but are we to include the initial images provided by Jeep , or Anomalies discovered after ?

funbox



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: funbox

If it comes to a list I think more than ten would be fitting. You can get a top ten from BlueShift's posts alone, or yours, or Jeeps. A top thirty may be a bit much, but twenty potentials surely exist within the confines of this behemoth (and I still have hopes that the best is yet to come....is Rover ever going to cross over the sandy bits and get to the real foothills?).



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 08:10 AM
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a reply to: Aleister

yeah , most certainly no squeeze to twenty , mammoth task going through it though , certainly don't have time atm , seasonally pressurised at the moment ,kind of unlike Mars's atmos
with its densely thin atmosphere


see what peeps think I guess ,

offBox



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 06:25 PM
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Haven't seen one of these in a while:
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

nice shot ,very Fibonacci

from the same set , not quite on the same par




mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

odd looking


funbox



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 07:20 PM
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gnarly rock in a smooth container ?

this new region has quite a feast for the eyes




mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

funbox



posted on Dec, 18 2014 @ 12:10 AM
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originally posted by: funbox
odd looking

Yeah, I saw that. I thought it looked like a bobby pin. Maybe that's what my antenna bugs look like before they flatten out.





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