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Curiosity: Potential Anomalies (Update 01/2014)

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posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 06:56 AM
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Funbox's GIF competence need... www.abovetopsecret.com...




posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 10:56 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

that rock behind has a massive specular highlight, the trinkets is small and concentrated on the curve

not comparable as materials go unfortunately


they show different reactions to light

funbox



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 11:18 AM
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originally posted by: funbox
that rock behind has a massive specular highlight, the trinkets is small and concentrated on the curve

I don't think it's a specular highlight, and the "trinkets" is less bright than the rock behind, as it would be if it was made of the same material, as it shows a smaller area facing the camera.


not comparable as materials go unfortunately


they show different reactions to light

How can you know that just by colour of the pixels?



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

because the rock behind it has a soft specular highlight

the object underneath has a sharp specular highlight

shininess of the two are different as indicated by the specular highlights

if the rock behind was like the shiny thing in front then it would have many sharp points of specularity , not blended altogether as it looks now . the curve of the trinket indicates a high reflective index ., like brushed metal


funbox



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: Aleister

are you referring to that unusual thing to its right Aleister ?. the brown thing looking like a a ridged crisp ?


funbox



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: funbox

YES I scream as the cap lock lock up, the sea-shell like maybe segmented piece just on the right of the shiny pen. But once again we are all foiled by the percentage of zoom this has to endure to exhibit it's properties.



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: Aleister


ahh its not so bad Aleister , it could be on the horizon surrounded by angry looking jpg artifacts


wielding spears even

don't forget there's a bit more to be got from zoom, when the camera is facing towards the ground

but indeed ill consign, once again this one to the potential maybe/maybenot box due to N.A.S.A ' S, 'more is merrier policy '

to think , if they put some rubber on the tyres , we wouldn't have all the pictures of scarred metal wheel , taken by the best camera, and maybe leave some bandwidth for some high res wheeless pictures

*

funbox



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
because the rock behind it has a soft specular highlight

the object underneath has a sharp specular highlight

I don't see any specular highlights in any of those rocks.


shininess of the two are different as indicated by the specular highlights

We can only see differences in colour, we don't have any way of knowing reflectivity just by looking at the photos, unless we could see Curiosity reflected in it somewhere.


if the rock behind was like the shiny thing in front then it would have many sharp points of specularity , not blended altogether as it looks now .

I think it's just white.



the curve of the trinket indicates a high reflective index ., like brushed metal

I think it's just a bright coloured rock.



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 01:27 PM
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I don't see any specular highlights in any of those rocks


ok , can you see highlight on the rocks all over the picture? can you see light gradiating to shadow on some of the surfaces?




We can only see differences in colour, we don't have any way of knowing reflectivity just by looking at the photos, unless we could see Curiosity reflected in it somewhere.


ill stop using 3d modelling terminology

heres what wiki says about specularity


Specularity is the visual appearance of specular reflections. In computer graphics, it means the quantity used in three-dimensional (3D) rendering which represents the amount of specular reflectivity a surface has. It is a key component in determining the brightness of specular highlights, along with shininess to determine the size of the highlights.


its not just about reflections , as if you would see any at this resolution





I think it's just white.


fair play




I think it's just a bright coloured rock.


even with all that dust? .. how did it stay unaffected ? ..hmmm..!... maybe its surface is smooth and shiny , frictionless


dam , I hated that .. ill not do it again

funbox



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 01:39 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
ok , can you see highlight on the rocks all over the picture? can you see light gradiating to shadow on some of the surfaces?

I can, obviously.


ill stop using 3d modelling terminology

That's probably the problem, as I was interpreting "specular" in the more common (as far as I know) sense of "mirror-like".


even with all that dust? .. how did it stay unaffected ? ..hmmm..!... maybe its surface is smooth and shiny , frictionless

Why, is everything equally covered with dust?



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

I doubt the feeble wind has that kind of marksmanship to get it distributed fairly.. im sure some rock species are discriminated against, maybe some of the more favoured by the blue it tribes, wind can be so fickle at times


funbox



posted on Aug, 16 2014 @ 10:20 AM
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a reply to: funbox

Shiny. And since we mention the blueit people every so often, I'll put the Mars photo of a blueit up so people can either gasp in horror, smile while wanting to cuddle it, or carry their rock hammers to it to chip off some of that obvious rock structure (blueits paws turned out to be something else worth oogling, I mean googling).




posted on Aug, 17 2014 @ 02:00 AM
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a reply to: this thread

Interesting parallel grooves or striations (slightly contrast-enhanced) ...


Source Image

I haven't really noticed features like these on the other rocks before, perhaps they are glacial striations, concretions of strata ... or something entirely different altogether? Remnants of a geologically more active period?
edit on 17-8-2014 by jeep3r because: text



posted on Aug, 17 2014 @ 03:04 AM
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a reply to: jeep3r
It's a lake bed.
Lakes form sedimentary rocks. In layers.
www.sciencemag.org...
edit on 8/17/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2014 @ 04:08 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Yes, Phage ... the basics, always good to remember!

I guess it would be more precise then to call those features concretions of sedimentary layers (instead of strata). Yet, I haven't seen many of those chunks lying around as seen in that image, with such regular striations.



posted on Aug, 17 2014 @ 06:11 AM
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a reply to: Aleister

now I look back on the it , it looks to me like its got some shades on its head


another picture of shiny thing , still looks odd , starting to remind me of an old gramophone




719 mast

funbox



posted on Aug, 17 2014 @ 06:15 AM
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a reply to: funbox

And now that I look at it better I see that the brighter rocks appear to have been broken by Curiosity's wheels.



posted on Aug, 17 2014 @ 06:21 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

which opens the door. no doubt, to the shiny piece being a fragment of the larger rock I suppose ?


at least we know where the dust went from the rocks surface


funbox


edit on 17-8-2014 by funbox because: www



posted on Aug, 17 2014 @ 06:23 AM
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Is it me or does that rock in the centre of the photo looks like a bone?




posted on Aug, 17 2014 @ 06:26 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

the one half covered in dust , slightly deformed thigh bone ? I see it



funbox


edit on 17-8-2014 by funbox because: WWW



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