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The cold snaps and dealing with it.

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posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:48 PM
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I saw an article in my local news that made me think of you guys and gals and this forum.
www.ottawasun.com...

A big thing in my survival thoughts are dealing with the freezing cold.
I camped last weekend and the coldest it got was minus 11 and I slept in a tent that only shielded the wind.
I forgot my thermarest and didn't mind dealing with sleeping on the cold ground with an awesome sleeping bag that I knew would keep me warm.

How do you deal with the cold and what would you do if it was minus 30 for a month straight??

Tips are welcome as I need them.....my worst fear is minus 30 for 3 months and how to live through it.
So what do you got ats??

How would you deal with my worst fear?

Just a note....I do this for the hard moments and for fun...what if the fun goes away and it becomes real?

edit on 30-12-2013 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 06:10 PM
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Prolonged and extreme cold is one of my biggest survival situation fears. From a wilderness medicine perspective, two things you want to avoid, and it may sound strange, are over-heating and dehydration. If one over-heats they sweat- sweating in the cold is not good for balancing body temperature in an already challenging environment (clothes become wet, etc. etc.).

Dehydration can happen very easily in cold temps as one typically doesn't feel thirsty or the need to keep up the fluid intake, and should be a point of concern for any survivalist.

Also, sticks of butter- a good calorie-dense, inexpensive food material which can be easily stored & carried. Caloric intake (which roughly equates to heat) along with maintaining hydration are critical for surviving in such harsh conditions.
*Edit: I have heard accounts of those on arctic & antarctic expeditions actually craving butter and many teams do in fact carry sticks for straight-up eating. Sounds disgusting to me, but I'd do it to see the next sunrise.


Hope of some help/interest, sorry if this isn't what you were looking for.
edit on 30-12-2013 by FatherStacks because: spelling

edit on 30-12-2013 by FatherStacks because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 06:15 PM
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adapting to survival in extreme cold takes decades to achieve, I think your best chance at survival if you're in a place with extreme cold temperatures would be to migrate south where warmer temperatures can be expected.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 06:16 PM
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Stock up on calorie bars!

www.amazon.com...



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 06:23 PM
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I can say from personal experience that I have been outside in minus thirty temps...most likely windchill temps, though because actual minus thirty is rare, even where I come from (MN). So, what does one do to prepare for those temps? Depends on your heat source. If you have a furnace that runs on electric and propane, it's always a good idea to make sure your bills are paid up, and if you are really smart, you also would have a wood furnace/fireplace...nothing like a back up plan, which I whole heartedly believe in. At least that way, if you do lose power, you would still have a heat source and ability to cook. Always keep an eye on the weather forecast and plan accordingly, that way you can go into town and stock up and have plenty of everything on hand to make your snowed in adventure fun. Some of my best memories are of being snowed in, no school and no where to go...perfect



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by BlueMule
 


Where would I find a store in the woods that sells calorie bars??



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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Ditch the thermarest and get some Reflectix 25-ft x 48-in Reflective Insulation from Lowes. Stuff is so tough. It can be cut to whatever size you need. Is waterproof and reflects heat and cold very well. I go camping in the winter with a big sheet of it. I find some long sticks and make a little taco facing the camp fire. Im never cold. Have to have a good sleeping bag and keep the fire going, but thats not hard.

Also, If you ever need to build a fire and need firewood. Look for "standing dead wood" Dead trees that are still standing but are easily toppled. They are usually super dry. Just be careful that the top doesn't break off and fall on your head. Sometimes its a good idea to tie a rope as high as you can and pull, or use a strong long stick to get the top to fall.

I have envisioned a clam shell or tube made out of the above material with a few slits covered with tyvek for a waterproof, yet breathable winter shelter. You could bury it in the snow and be super warm with a candle lantern inside. It would be light and you could roll it right up and put in your pulk sled.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 07:24 PM
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Just wanted to add that this is an excellent topic, and thanks for bringing it for discussion. If a survivalist/prepper lives in a region where the potential for extreme cold exists and they aren't 100% ready for it, then they simply aren't prepared. Period.

Winter survival must be at the core of any plan, not just an extension, because it doesn't matter how well a person can deal with June, July and August,...it's being ready for January and February that will decide whether or not you live to see the next year in a worst case, SHTF scenario.

Thinking about ways of surviving the most extreme winter weather taxes my brainpower for anything beyond the obvious, and I can't wait for the more informed members to weigh in.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 07:26 PM
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I'll have to come back later and chime in ... but I've done plenty of over nights in sub-zero temps. One quick tip --

COTTON KILLS. Don't wear cotton when it's cold outside! It looses all it's warmth when wet!



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 07:44 PM
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For clothing, you can't beat layers of linen (natural fiber linen, not a synthetic blend) and 100% wool. Linen breathes and wicks, and when worn under wool, it prevents evaporation and dehydration in colder temps. Wool is also naturally water resistant and does NOT lose its insulating properties when wet. Also, it does not openly burn, but slowly smoulder (in case you get too close to that fire).

These two materials got humans through some of the worse conditions for thousands of years....so why would that change now? And, you are not dependent upon a high tech material that would be invaluable....when you can get wool from many different animals very easily.

Linen is just natural fiber, and grows as flax. Again, no dependence upon any "space age materials" that are irreplaceable.

As for warmth while sleeping, #1 is to sleep off the ground. The ground is a massive heat-sink, and will draw your valuable heat away in short order. Then, if you have a small sleeping space, it can be kept relatively warm with a simple candle flame (either paraffin wax, beeswax, or oil, rendered fat, etc...) or stones warmed in the fire during the day. The key is not to make it 80+ degrees (F) in there, but warm enough above freezing to balance out your loss in generated heat.

And I second the "don't exert yourself to sweating stage during the day" approach. Take it day by day, and if possible, migrate to warmer climates and watch the sky and local animals behavior. If they are migrating, then it's a good bet you should too.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


A friend of mine showed me how to make a small wood burning stove out of an ammo box. Apart from the ammo box you just need some bolts, a bit of expanded metal and a 2.5" exhaust pipe (or 2.5" flexible SS hose). Most parts, sans ammo box, you can get from a wrecking yard. If you want to cook on it, weld on on small brake rotor ;-) It cost about 10 bucks to make and it will keep the inside of a tent very warm.

For cabins up to 1500 sq ft, take two old propane cylinders, cut off the ends and weld the two larger parts together. Cut a hole in one end to feed in wood and use one of the cut ends as a door. You'll need 3" to 4" pipe for the flue. You can use bolts as legs if you are putting on the ground, or you can use a spacer system to reduce heat transfer for other kinds of surfaces. Again, you can use a brake rotor on top if you want a cooking surface. Also inside, you can use a baffle to slow down and re-burn gases. If you want higher amounts of heat, weld a smaller cylinder where you would put the flue, with a couple of baffles to slow down the exhaust gases and radiate more heat, then weld the flue coupling on top of that. Make sure you have a clean-out though as you never know what you'd have to burn and you want to keep the creosote down.

Only problem with small stoves is you have to keep feeding them small wood that burns off pretty fast. But you can always throw in small amounts of fire brick or lava rocks to retain the heat for a few hours.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


How do I deal with a month long cold snap....Stay home and feed the wood cookstove, drinking coffee and maybe even a hot toddy if needed. I never camped in temperatures lower than -10 F



posted on Dec, 31 2013 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by Krakatoa
 


I don't know...

Down is a great insulator, but it's worthless when it gets wet. Chances are they'll be snow on the ground if it's sub zero outside. The chances of a down sleeping bag getting wet are exponentially higher. Down also clumps up and is just plain nasty to work with when wet.

I went out and bought the warmest synthetic bag I could find. I ended up with a North Face Dark Star, rated to -40F/-40C. So far it's much to warm to use even when it gets down to 0F.

I look to the people climbing mountains like Everest and Mt. McKinley. The harshest conditions in the world can be found up there. If it's good enough for them, it'll certainly keep me alive at sea level.



posted on Dec, 31 2013 @ 04:58 PM
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MystikMushroom
reply to post by Krakatoa
 


I don't know...

Down is a great insulator, but it's worthless when it gets wet. Chances are they'll be snow on the ground if it's sub zero outside. The chances of a down sleeping bag getting wet are exponentially higher. Down also clumps up and is just plain nasty to work with when wet.

I went out and bought the warmest synthetic bag I could find. I ended up with a North Face Dark Star, rated to -40F/-40C. So far it's much to warm to use even when it gets down to 0F.

I look to the people climbing mountains like Everest and Mt. McKinley. The harshest conditions in the world can be found up there. If it's good enough for them, it'll certainly keep me alive at sea level.



Who said anything about "down"? I said WOOL and LINEN.....not down feathers. Also, if you plan to sleep on the ground, I suggest making a bed of something first (pine boughs, straw, dead grasses, etc...) to sleep atop to keep off the ground.

As for Mt climbing, yeah, but they are also acclimated to the weather there before they make the climb. What if that fancy synthetic bag gets ripped? What if it melts? Then what? The art of survival is keyed upon adaptation and innovation with what is around. Having that knowledge is worth more IMO than all the fancy tech in the world.




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