It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Advice needed on purchasing a motorcycle

page: 2
2
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 04:45 PM
link   
reply to post by denybedoomed
 


With anything mechanical, its really good to have a trusted mechanic check it out first. This could save you a ton of trouble... Are you able to do that?




posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 04:52 PM
link   

InTheLight

Bigburgh
reply to post by InTheLight
 


True. But I was inexperienced and 750 was just right. But I am now looking for something bigger


LOL. Don't suggest he buy a Shadow, only biker chicks ride those.


But a least I didn't suggest a Honda Rebel 250cc



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 04:52 PM
link   
reply to post by Serdgiam
 


There's a guy in town that wouldn't screw me around, I can have him check it out.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 04:57 PM
link   
reply to post by denybedoomed
 


Just a bit of advice.
When I bought my first bike...I never rode one before.
I would wake up at the crack of dawn and ride around the EMPTY city to learn...wake up early and have the city to yourself to learn.

Also...my first bike was a yamaha 225xt...so was my second.(it has a highway gear and does the speed limit)
Don't believe the more power people....if you get done what you want....mission accomplished.
If I upgrade its going to be a 400.
I stick with my suzuki 650 DR advice.

edit on 30-12-2013 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:01 PM
link   
You wouldn't be around the Reno area would ya. If so try shooting over I-80 and down through Gilroy on so to So.Cal. as a tester trip for distance and endurance.

It took me a month of daily riding pushing the distance to be comfortable. And then did the Pittsburgh to Gettysburg trip. Next year will be the outer banks in north Carolina.
edit on 30-12-2013 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:01 PM
link   
reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


Thanks, luckily, the only time this place gets heavy traffic is during the summer months when people are passing through. There are plenty of roads around that I can take my time on learning.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:02 PM
link   

Bigburgh

InTheLight

Bigburgh
reply to post by InTheLight
 


True. But I was inexperienced and 750 was just right. But I am now looking for something bigger


LOL. Don't suggest he buy a Shadow, only biker chicks ride those.


But a least I didn't suggest a Honda Rebel 250cc


You would then have to call it a scooter. LOL

He's tall so he needs to ride tall in the saddle.
edit on 30-12-2013 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:08 PM
link   

InTheLight

Bigburgh

InTheLight

Bigburgh
reply to post by InTheLight
 


True. But I was inexperienced and 750 was just right. But I am now looking for something bigger


LOL. Don't suggest he buy a Shadow, only biker chicks ride those.


But a least I didn't suggest a Honda Rebel 250cc


You would then have to call it a scooter. LOL

He's tall so he needs to ride tall in the saddle.
edit on 30-12-2013 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)


(((Spurting water))) I did actually consider a Vespa for laughs. Complete with leather chaps a stringers for the handle bars.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:08 PM
link   
If you have NO riding experience, I highly recommend you take a motorcycle safety course in your area.
You can usually take one over a weekend.

There's a ton of counter-intuitive things you should be familiar with on a bike as compared to a car.

It could save your life and prevent it from coming into danger period.

Scenic roads off the beaten path can be just as dangerous, if not even more so than regular traffic routes due animals, reverse graded/sloped roads around mountains that allow fallen rocks to roll off, but can really screw with the turning radius prediction and set up on a motorcycle, as well as the remoteness of off-the-beaten-path locations should an accident happen.

Simple choices like taking a full-face helmet over a half shell could save you from an errant wasp or honeybee flying into your mouth.

Familiarizing with the safety of proper riding attire could save you from having to see what your exposed muscles and tendons look like after the skin has been peeled off.

Take the Motorcycle Safety and Riding Course in your area. Get you and your brother to do it together. You'll be glad you did.





posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:09 PM
link   
reply to post by Bigburgh
 


Reno's about five hours away, but I've driven on the I-80 across country so many times I'm sick of it. We have a lot of good loops around this area, I live about forty mins away from Yosemite so that would be cool.

We'll probably start off on the 395 or the 6



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:10 PM
link   

denybedoomed
reply to post by Serdgiam
 


There's a guy in town that wouldn't screw me around, I can have him check it out.


Its a relatively small investment for a lot of peace of mind. I mean, its not like you are pouring tens of thousands of dollars into the bike, but you are taking it on a long trip. You need to know that its going to make it. Of course, even if its mechanically sound, be sure to take a tool kit!

As far as engine size goes, you can modify smaller displacement engines to output pretty significant power. So, the determination should be made more on what type of riding experience you enjoy more. Smaller engines and larger engines ride quite differently. Different types of engines will also differ.

For an enjoyable road trip though, the fact you are on a motorcycle alone will be good enough (as long as its comfortable!).



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:10 PM
link   

Bigburgh

InTheLight

Bigburgh

InTheLight

Bigburgh
reply to post by InTheLight
 


True. But I was inexperienced and 750 was just right. But I am now looking for something bigger


LOL. Don't suggest he buy a Shadow, only biker chicks ride those.


But a least I didn't suggest a Honda Rebel 250cc


You would then have to call it a scooter. LOL

He's tall so he needs to ride tall in the saddle.
edit on 30-12-2013 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)


(((Spurting water))) I did actually consider a Vespa for laughs. Complete with leather chaps a stringers for the handle bars.


((Spurting water too)) too much. LOL



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:10 PM
link   
Joking aside.. purchase what feels best. Like the other poster said. As long as it gets the desired job done.

If the bike scares you to ride. Then it's not the bike for you.
edit on 30-12-2013 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:14 PM
link   
reply to post by AliceBleachWhite
 


I looked into the safety course and big surprise there are none in my immediate area, but I don't mind driving four or five hours to take one.

Don't suppose they let you use "loaners" for the course? Haha



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:15 PM
link   
If you are able, why not rent a small cycle and ride it in an unpopulated area, as well as studying up on defensive riding, which is a lot of information and learning to do right there. That's really how I learned after taking a motorcycle course (which wasn't really long enough to get the feel) and I did a lot of serpentines to master the handling aspect of it.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:16 PM
link   

denybedoomed
reply to post by Bigburgh
 


Reno's about five hours away, but I've driven on the I-80 across country so many times I'm sick of it. We have a lot of good loops around this area, I live about forty mins away from Yosemite so that would be cool.

We'll probably start off on the 395 or the 6


Wow Yosemite would be a nice bike ride.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:20 PM
link   
reply to post by Bigburgh
 


Yeah, really this whole area (Owens Valley) has spectacular scenery. And as far as in the light said, the road up to the Ancient Bristlecone Forest is a serpentine.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:20 PM
link   

InTheLight
If you are able, why not rent a small cycle and ride it in an unpopulated area, as well as studying up on defensive riding, which is a lot of information and learning to do right there. That's really how I learned after taking a motorcycle course (which wasn't really long enough to get the feel) and I did a lot of serpentines to master the handling aspect of it.


That's a viable option but, if he only has a permit. Places will not rent to him. It can be pricy too.
Perhaps get the permit and find a buddy for practice.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:21 PM
link   
reply to post by denybedoomed
 


Practice is needed for sure. I have been riding for about 17 years now and my first actual road bike was a 1000 undressed goldwing haha. I sold it fast. I bought a 1985 Vulcan 750 from my dad when I was 19. I am 34 now and still have it. I since then also own a kz1100. When i first bought the kz it was a lot of power to get use . I learned to respect it quickly. I wanted to do some out of state runs to Tenn. This summer from Michigan, so I shopped around for a concourse 14 I found a really nice 2009 with abs and snagged it up last summer. I am very please with the bikes power and . I am 5 ft 11. 200 lbs. Its a tall bike but it rides like a dream smooth and rocket like. very controllable in the power. I would recommend it for long distance to anyone my height or taller. Good luck with your hunt for the right bike if you lived closer and the snow was gone I would say come take a seat and check it out.



posted on Dec, 30 2013 @ 05:22 PM
link   
reply to post by Bigburgh
 


My cousins ride, but their bikes are freaking huge, just like them.



new topics

top topics



 
2
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join