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The El Hierro Volcano Ready To Blow?

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posted on Dec, 28 2013 @ 07:57 PM
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I remember when this new island just suddenly appeared and was fascinated by it to say the least. Posted a thread but many took no interest. Puterman of course dropped by for a visit.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

A 5.4 earthquake yesterday marked a change in the small, low-level earthquake swarm that has been a feature of life in the Canary Islands for more than two years. The underwater volcano that appeared just off the coast of El Hierro two years ago has also changed in height, increasing more than four inches in just a couple of days.

Whether it blows or not is anyone's guess right now but if it does we could have another tsunami to deal with.

Simon Day and Steven Ward wrote a paper describing the mechanism of an explosion and collapse on La Palma that would lead to a mega-tsunami. You can read it here: www.es.ucsc.edu...

It;s a good read but I just posted the conclusion.

6. Conclusions: Geological evidence suggests that during a future eruption, Cumbre Vieja Volcano on the Island of La Palma may experi- ence a catastrophic flank collapse. For a 500 km 3 slide block running westward 60 km down the offshore slope at 100 m/s, our computer models predict that tsunami waves 10 to 25 m high will be felt at transoceanic distances spanning azimuths that target most of the Atlantic basin. Simulations of other collapse scenarios indicate that for slides that do not run too close to the tsunami wave speed, peak tsunami amplitude fol- lows roughly in proportion to landslide volume times peak landslide velocity. (The proportionality is location- dependent, and it holds more strictly for volume and less strictly for peak velocity.) Thus, more modest assumptions on the size and peak speed of the slide make for smaller waves. For instance, a 250 km 3 block running westward 60 km at 50 m/s generates tsunami with about 1/4 to 3/8 the amplitude of those presented above



The original report I read when it first happened is here as well:
www.newscientist.com...
Although this is incredibly fascinating to watch unfold, let's hope for the best outcome.

theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com...
The earthquake’s epicenter was 13 miles (22 kilometers) deep. Before the earthquake struck early this afternoon, the island’s volcano monitoring agency, Pelvolca, had raised the volcanic eruption risk for El Hierro to “yellow.” This warning means that activity is increasing at the volcano, but no eruption is imminent. A similar burst of activity prompted a yellow warning in June 2012, but the volcano soon quieted down. –TEP, LS


Peace


edit on 28-12-2013 by jude11 because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 28 2013 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Is this the volcano/land slide that many believe would create a tsunami that would decimate the east coast of the US?



posted on Dec, 28 2013 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by jhn7537
 

No. That is La Palma.

Different island. It is also a landslide (not a volcanic eruption) which some believe may cause an Atlantic wide tsunami. There are also some who do not believe this would be the case.

edit on 12/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2013 @ 08:58 PM
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Phage
reply to post by jhn7537
 

No. That is La Palma.

Different island. It is also a landslide (not a volcanic eruption) which some believe may cause an Atlantic wide tsunami. There are also some who do not believe this would be the case.

edit on 12/28/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Thanks for the clarification, Phage... I knew it was somewhere along the Atlantic, just wasn't sure of the name.



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