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Year in science: lLake Vostoc, lost cities, dna discoveries

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posted on Dec, 28 2013 @ 01:16 PM
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DNA points to complexity in human origins: This month, scientists announced that they deciphered 400,000-year-old DNA extracted from bones found in a Spanish cave. That technical achievement set a record, but it also turned up something unexpected: genetic linkages to a mysterious population of human ancestors in Siberia, known as Denisovans. Other studies have pointed to interbreeding among Neanderthals, Denisovans and ancient representatives of our own species, Homo sapiens. DNA signatures even hint at humanlike populations yet to be identified. Such findings support the view that our family tree isn't organized into clear-cut roots and branches, but instead consists of bushy, messy tangles.

Year in science: lLake Vostoc, lost cities, dna discoveries

This is somewhat old news to the ATS crowd but it gives a good review of some of the important science discoveries of 2013 as well as updates. Sometimes the updates to science are just as important as the scientific discovery itself.

What say you, ATS?




posted on Dec, 28 2013 @ 01:36 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


Chimpanzees are apparently 95-98% genetically alike to humans yet humans cannot breed with a chimp, how can they prove that this DNA was compatible enough to allow for breeding between differing species in the first place? I think it is supposed evidence to keep Darwinism alive and the status quo the same. What they should do is clone these supposed different species and see if they can make a baby.



posted on Dec, 28 2013 @ 02:07 PM
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Brotherman
reply to post by lostbook
 


Chimpanzees are apparently 95-98% genetically alike to humans yet humans cannot breed with a chimp, how can they prove that this DNA was compatible enough to allow for breeding between differing species in the first place? I think it is supposed evidence to keep Darwinism alive and the status quo the same. What they should do is clone these supposed different species and see if they can make a baby.


There probably already have been present day attempts to clone, genetically modify, or interbreed. There's a lot more going on behind the curtain than just costume changing.



posted on Dec, 28 2013 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


I think it is a safe bet to say for certain, we know really little in regards to our origins. This is why I remain entirely skeptical one way or another. In order for life itself to exist within our planet it requires a symbiotic environment, how did that occur at the same instance?



posted on Dec, 28 2013 @ 03:36 PM
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Brotherman
reply to post by lostbook
 


I think it is a safe bet to say for certain, we know really little in regards to our origins. This is why I remain entirely skeptical one way or another. In order for life itself to exist within our planet it requires a symbiotic environment, how did that occur at the same instance?


I see what you're getting at and I don't have all of the answers, if any. Maybe early on, this symbiotic environment you speak of was the Earth itself.



posted on Dec, 29 2013 @ 06:42 AM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


And the OP's source has a list of other top science stories of 2013. Here's there list of "not quite rocket science" which is really interesting (they lead off with the biological gear), and I don't think all of them have made ATS.

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com...

One at random:


“Mountain ranges and rivers can act as physical barriers that separate closely related species and keep them from cross-breeding. But the trillions of microbes in an animal’s guts could have the same role. Robert Brucker and Seth Bordenstein, biologists at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, have found that the gut bacteria of two recently diverged wasp species act as a living barrier that stops their evolutionary paths from reuniting. The wasps have subtly different collections of gut microbes, and when they cross-breed, the hybrids develop a distorted microbiome that causes their untimely deaths.”

edit on 29-12-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2013 @ 11:32 AM
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Aleister
reply to post by lostbook
 


And the OP's source has a list of other top science stories of 2013. Here's there list of "not quite rocket science" which is really interesting (they lead off with the biological gear), and I don't think all of them have made ATS.

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com...

One at random:


“Mountain ranges and rivers can act as physical barriers that separate closely related species and keep them from cross-breeding. But the trillions of microbes in an animal’s guts could have the same role. Robert Brucker and Seth Bordenstein, biologists at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, have found that the gut bacteria of two recently diverged wasp species act as a living barrier that stops their evolutionary paths from reuniting. The wasps have subtly different collections of gut microbes, and when they cross-breed, the hybrids develop a distorted microbiome that causes their untimely deaths.”

edit on 29-12-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)


Interesting. Thanks for the find! I found the insect with gears the most memorable one. I know my list isn't a complete list and there are many more discoveries/ happenings for 2013 than in any one list.



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