3D Printed AtmoMotor HV Atmospheric Motor - Wireless Energy.. Is there an engineer in the house?

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posted on Dec, 25 2013 @ 05:52 AM
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The motor was printed out except for the drive shaft, bearings, and aluminum tubes
I was impressed with the torque and his creativeness.. Then I thought of something I had seen many years ago with a guy holding a fluorescent light under some high tension lines and the bulb actually produced light. If you had some power lines around a guy could put this motor's antenna in the vicinity of the lines and ?? possibly power the motor which could power something else useful.. I am not an electrical engineer but it sure seems like something like this would work with enough wire and a handy high tension electrical line overhead.



Start at 5:30 and see what power leakage there is from high tension power lines..The video is of lighting several dozen fluorescent bulbs in a field under some power lines..
edit on 25-12-2013 by 727Sky because: s




posted on Dec, 25 2013 @ 06:19 AM
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The current lighting the fluorescent tubes is a result of electromagnetic induction from the HV transmission lines. The principle you mentioned about using this to power a motor is already used in a self contained device called an induction motor which utilises magnetic fields to negate the need for mechanical commutation to the rotor.



posted on Dec, 25 2013 @ 07:21 AM
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Morgil
The current lighting the fluorescent tubes is a result of electromagnetic induction from the HV transmission lines. The principle you mentioned about using this to power a motor is already used in a self contained device called an induction motor which utilises magnetic fields to negate the need for mechanical commutation to the rotor.


Thank you for the reply and I am semi familiar in lay terms with electromagnetic induction; the question I really have is would his antenna and motor work if placed next to some power lines... I am thinking about some off the grid person leeching electricity and powering all kinds of things with a few motors like the one in the video... Even just a fan on a hot day would be nice IMO.



posted on Dec, 25 2013 @ 08:09 AM
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reply to post by 727Sky
 


I don't believe the flux density would be sufficient to produce much of an emf at that distance. The lines are placed at a height so as to prevent any danger either from direct contact or from the effects of the electromagnetic field.

I suspect that even if the induced current was substantial enough to be harnessed, it would not be sufficient for the torque to overcome the friction of the rotor.
edit on 25/12/13 by Morgil because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 25 2013 @ 08:59 AM
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The main problem is your utility company has the right of way under the HV lines and even though it's lost electricity, they consider it stealing. I'll try to look fpor some articles where this has occurred.



posted on Dec, 25 2013 @ 09:01 AM
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Even worse, it's not so much an electromagnetic induction effect with the fluorescent bulbs, it's the electric field from the power lines slamming free electrons around in the bulbs. Some percentage of them will pick up enough speed to knock an electron loose from a mercury gas atom in the bulb and when it recombines, that'll give you some UV that causes the coating to fluoresce. Since the mercury gas is not nearly as dense in the bulb as it would be in normal operation, the light is generally a bit dimmer than normal.

The bulbs are pretty high impedance so you don't get a lot of electric field line bending in the area of the bulb, and you end up with enough potential across the bulb to do the trick.

However, if you put a low impedance object like a motor there, the lines will bend around the object, the way they do around YOU in the same environment, and the potential will be near zero. Thus do motors not turn under a power line on their own the way the bulbs light up.

There is not any way to get a substantial amount of power from a power line. You could, I suppose, climb the pylon and toss a few hundred loops around one of the phases, but I don't think you'd survive it.



posted on Dec, 25 2013 @ 09:34 AM
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wireless and free energy is out of our current level of technology. Movement of electrons at the magnitude of say 30 amps @ 120 volts is not in our current realm. for wireless energy to run your home electric heat unit, the local atmosphere around the vacinity would be volitile and effect all matter including humans which require electrical pulses to function in basic levels. this free energy would overwhelm these low energy pulses. As frequency is the key in this theory, we are not even close to real answers and even in "perfect" conditions improbable reactions will occour, but what happens during a lightning event, what completely controls these electrons will be uncontrolable, therefore unknown end results. One of Tesla's theories is based on earth ground, in other words, if you overwhelm the earth's localized magnetic capacity to sustain controlled electron flow, what happens to the energy that is not balanced, uncontrolled dissapation was his answer....



posted on Dec, 25 2013 @ 10:09 AM
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As has been stated, this is not new technology. Induction has been understood for a very long time. It's the underlying principle behind all electric motors, solenoids, buzzers, transformers, etc. The only difference here is that this person is using high-voltage induction to send power wirelessly. Tesla did the same thing prior to 1900 on a small scale; it's what led to the construction of the ill-fated Wardenclyffe Tower in Colorado Springs.

If one were to take this type of device and use the electric field from HV transmission lines to power it, one is guilty of stealing. The electrostatic field around these transmission lines are a consequence of the AC voltage being carried, and will exist around the lines. If energy is taken from that field, energy from the lines will be lost in order to maintain it, meaning the end result is pulling energy from the lines without paying for it. People have been convicted of theft by doing such things. Playing with a fluorescent bulb is one thing, but if you start drawing substantial power? Yeah, that will be prosecuted.

TheRedneck
edit on 12/25/2013 by TheRedneck because: typo



posted on Dec, 25 2013 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Agree, but light or low level induction is one thing, but you will never get anything substantial from this field of energy. For high level electrical energy to be used by induction, the producing generator has to be designed for the end result of inducing this power to the recieving end... in other words from start to finish, the energy fields must match, otherwise uncontrolled and volitile magnetic dissapation. This uncontrolled field will effect, and be effected by several scenerios not limited to electrical storms. The main issue here is plain old frequency that channels this energy, just like a conduit, it has to be insulated, for lack of a better word...



posted on Dec, 25 2013 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by teslahowitzer

Oh, it's possible to design a pickup which will deliver power. Obviously one would be hard-pressed to get the kind of instantaneous power one could get from a wired connection, but it is possible to get enough power to be considered appreciable.

Here's some sample calculations for anyone familiar with electronic design.

You are correct that the receiver and transmitter must be matched for optimum power throughput, but this can be accomplished by designing the receiver to match the power lines. I won't explain exactly how, because I do not wish to aid anyone attempting theft. I will say that the motor presented would not be tuned to receive the power and thus would not be able to provide appreciable energy from transmission line EM fields, a position I think will agree with yours.

TheRedneck






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