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Rendlesham Forest…, A Christmas Story from 1980 - Can We ‘Let it Be’?

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posted on Oct, 3 2017 @ 10:31 PM
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a reply to: mirageman
We all should know that microwaves can theoretically cook humans on the battlefield since many of us have microwave ovens that cook meats pretty well. However our little ovens direct maybe 1000+ watts into a smallish box, so if you want to scale that up to the size of a battlefield to cook humans, the power requirements would be enormous, not to mention it would give "friendly fire" a whole new meaning when you accidentally cook your own troops instead of the enemy troops.

With less power instead of cooking people completely you can just warm up their skin to uncomfortable levels, but even this weapon system doesn't seem to be popular due to power requirements and the heating type microwave weapon seems to be the only one officially admitted to being developed. Engineers have tried to explain on ATS why some of the other RF weapon systems ideas don't pan out in reality.

So fast-forward some decades and nobody even wanted the only high-power microwave weapon system officially developed:
High-Power Microwave Weapons Start to Look Like Dead-End

Despite 50 years of research on high-power microwaves, the U.S. military has yet to produce a usable weapon

For some Pentagon officials, the demonstration in October 2007 must have seemed like a dream come true — an opportunity to blast reporters with a beam of energy that causes searing pain.

The event in Quantico, Virginia, was to be a rare public showing for the US Air Force's Active Denial System: a prototype non-lethal crowd-control weapon that emits a beam of microwaves at 95 gigahertz. Radiation at that frequency penetrates less than half a millimeter into the skin, so the beam was supposed to deliver an intense burning sensation to anyone in its path, forcing them to move away, but without, in theory, causing permanent damage.

However, the day of the test was cold and rainy. The water droplets in the air did what moisture always does: they absorbed the microwaves. And when some of the reporters volunteered to expose themselves to the attenuated beam, they found that on such a raw day, the warmth was very pleasant.
I think it was brave of the reporters to volunteer but the Pentagon didn't want to hear them say the heat felt good.



A demonstration of the system on a sunny day this March proved more successful. But that hasn't changed a fundamental reality for the Pentagon's only acknowledged, fully developed high-power microwave (HPM) weapon: no one seems to want it. Although the Active Denial System works (mostly) as advertised, its massive size, energy consumption and technical complexity make it effectively unusable on the battlefield.
I don't know how this escaped researchers like the ones interviewed in that video who talked about our capability to put huge amounts of power into RF transmitters. They are of course are correct that it's possible, but how are they going to deliver that kind of power to the battlefield? They seem to miss that point which is spelled out in the article detailing why RF weapons aren't successful.

If Lockheed Martin ever comes through with their project to put a fusion power generation station on the back of a large truck, then we might have the needed power source, but that's looking more and more like their claims were overly-optimistic and it's still pretty far off, though maybe possible some day, perhaps decades from now.

If anyone is trying to link some hypothesized RF weapons claims to the Rendlesham forest incident, the same issue surfaces, with how much power would be required for the suggested hypotheses and how would such a large amount of power be delivered to a forest?




posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 02:19 AM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur
a reply to: mirageman
We all should know that microwaves can theoretically cook humans on the battlefield since many of us have microwave ovens that cook meats pretty well. However our little ovens direct maybe 1000+ watts into a smallish box, so if you want to scale that up to the size of a battlefield to cook humans, the power requirements would be enormous, not to mention it would give "friendly fire" a whole new meaning when you accidentally cook your own troops instead of the enemy troops.

With less power instead of cooking people completely you can just warm up their skin to uncomfortable levels, but even this weapon system doesn't seem to be popular due to power requirements and the heating type microwave weapon seems to be the only one officially admitted to being developed. Engineers have tried to explain on ATS why some of the other RF weapon systems ideas don't pan out in reality.

So fast-forward some decades and nobody even wanted the only high-power microwave weapon system officially developed:
High-Power Microwave Weapons Start to Look Like Dead-End

Despite 50 years of research on high-power microwaves, the U.S. military has yet to produce a usable weapon

For some Pentagon officials, the demonstration in October 2007 must have seemed like a dream come true — an opportunity to blast reporters with a beam of energy that causes searing pain.

The event in Quantico, Virginia, was to be a rare public showing for the US Air Force's Active Denial System: a prototype non-lethal crowd-control weapon that emits a beam of microwaves at 95 gigahertz. Radiation at that frequency penetrates less than half a millimeter into the skin, so the beam was supposed to deliver an intense burning sensation to anyone in its path, forcing them to move away, but without, in theory, causing permanent damage.

However, the day of the test was cold and rainy. The water droplets in the air did what moisture always does: they absorbed the microwaves. And when some of the reporters volunteered to expose themselves to the attenuated beam, they found that on such a raw day, the warmth was very pleasant.
I think it was brave of the reporters to volunteer but the Pentagon didn't want to hear them say the heat felt good.



A demonstration of the system on a sunny day this March proved more successful. But that hasn't changed a fundamental reality for the Pentagon's only acknowledged, fully developed high-power microwave (HPM) weapon: no one seems to want it. Although the Active Denial System works (mostly) as advertised, its massive size, energy consumption and technical complexity make it effectively unusable on the battlefield.
I don't know how this escaped researchers like the ones interviewed in that video who talked about our capability to put huge amounts of power into RF transmitters. They are of course are correct that it's possible, but how are they going to deliver that kind of power to the battlefield? They seem to miss that point which is spelled out in the article detailing why RF weapons aren't successful.

If Lockheed Martin ever comes through with their project to put a fusion power generation station on the back of a large truck, then we might have the needed power source, but that's looking more and more like their claims were overly-optimistic and it's still pretty far off, though maybe possible some day, perhaps decades from now.

If anyone is trying to link some hypothesized RF weapons claims to the Rendlesham forest incident, the same issue surfaces, with how much power would be required for the suggested hypotheses and how would such a large amount of power be delivered to a forest?


Possibly by using a Gyrotron?

'class of amplifier with contemplated applications including plasma heating and mm radar'
tmo.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 03:04 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

The power requirements are an excellent point Arby. For those that believe that the alleged emissions were the point of what was going on, what could have provided that power source? For those that believe the emissions were a byproduct of another process, how badly engineered was any device causing them?



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 03:41 AM
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originally posted by: mirageman
a reply to: AdamE





...The following comment within the link is also intriguing.... ' Navy research in the mid-seventies determined that psychics could detect remote electromagnetic sources, indicating perhaps they could also detect submerged submarines. The Navy also sponsored research to see if psychics could influence the magnetometers used to detect the magnetism of submerged substances. Dr. Joel Lawson, once head of the Naval Electronic Systems Command, said "I have always believed that ESP is the only way to fight submarines. The magnetometer tests were designed to prove the principle." Once willing to discuss psychic warfare openly, now he has been officially silenced '




I think there was also an experiment involving baby rabbits being taken aboard a submarine and changes in brain patterns were detected in the mother rabbit (left onshore) when the babies were slaughtered aboard the sub. I haven't anything to hand to prove that was done at present and it might just be an urban myth.

Well anyway I found this interesting in that document you linked (from 1975)



Somewhere I think there is a story about US President Nixon visiting the Soviet bloc in the 1970s and reporting feeling 'unusual' . Is that just another urban myth?

Now if that was what was being proposed way back then it makes you wonder what was going on in the years that followed. Was it all a complete failure? The US projects went on for almost 20 years but didn't ever prove useful (according to official statements).

Maybe none of it was successful whatsoever and it was all generated by fear of the opposing side getting a real advantage in the Cold War. We don't really know what happened in the Soviet Union as it broke apart. Maybe the West appeared to have won the Cold War but the Russians were actually successful and you see it now in their control of the POTUS today?



Accordingly to Journalist Sharon Weinberger .....
WEINBERGER: Well, what happened was there was a great deal of interest in parapsychology in the late 1960s, early 1970s particularly from the intelligence community. So there was a man named Sidney Gottlieb who was the head of the Office of Technical Service at the CIA. He is today most famous for the MK Ultra program. These were the '___' experiments that were conducted by the CIA for, quote, unquote, "mind control" including on unwitting human victims. But Gottleib also had an interest in parapsychology

So I believe it was in the early 1970s that he invites Steve Lukasik who was then a director of DARPA over to his offices, and he wants to talk to Steve about this exciting program that he's doing in parapsychology. And what was going on was the Soviets, it turned out, had been doing these experiments in parapsychology including one that is as - sort of just grotesque where there was alleged to be sort of a psychic link between mothers and their offspring - or in the case of what the Soviets were allegedly doing experimenting with bunny rabbits - rabbits and their offspring.

And so the idea was if a bunny was killed in a separate room, that the mother rabbit, you know, in a different laboratory, you know, in the same building would somehow react, would know that her offspring had been hurt and killed and that this was done through a sort of mind link. And so the idea - this was being taken very seriously - the idea was that, perhaps, the Soviets thought - or the U.S. believed they thought - this could be used for submarine communication. You know, submarines, nuclear-armed submarines - any the submarines when they're deep under water are very hard to communicate with.

So how do you let these submarines know that, you know, nuclear Armageddon is coming, you need to surface and launch your missiles? And the idea was somehow this psychic link between the mother rabbit and its offspring would work. You could keep - I don't know a mother rabbit on the submarine, kill the offspring and that would be a sign that the nuclear submarines should surface. You know, it's hard to talk about this without laughing, but this was being seriously considered. So...

GROSS: And as part of the research, the Soviets were killing baby rabbits to see if the mother knew it.

WEINBERGER: Indeed.

GROSS: If the mother in another room knew it.

WEINBERGER: Indeed. That is what was going on. So that was one - I mean, the Soviets were interested across the breadth of parapsychology research - or at least the CIA thought. So the CIA had their own program that they were sponsoring at the Stanford Research Institute out in California where two physicists were working with Uri Geller, perhaps best known as the Israeli magician who also claims, you know, powers in parapsychology. And...

www.npr.org...



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 03:53 AM
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originally posted by: mirageman


I'll add this documentary as well from the mid-1980s.Tom Bearden even makes an appearance!

There is even a very loose hint to what the famous 1976 Iranian UFO might have been. I would guess there's a certain amount of exaggeration about the Soviet's capabilities in the field and anti-Soviet rhetoric. But that was symptomatic of the times.

If the Soviet bloc really had been leaders in the field back then I'm sure that by now we'd have seen them winning the psychotronics war. We'd have a Russian puppet in the Whitehouse and Western Europe starting to fracture.



Chuck DeCaro was recently interviewed on a radio station on 09-14-2017 with John Burroughs too:
kgraradioarchives.com...



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 04:32 AM
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a reply to: AdamE

Yeah it's on his page and wants people to
pay attention. Clearly watching all the discussions
here on ATS.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 11:32 AM
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originally posted by: AdamE
Possibly by using a Gyrotron?
The article I cited about the high power requirements used a 100,000 Watt gyrotron. As the article cited getting 100,000 watts to the battlefield isn't easy, nor would it be easy to get it to a forest like Rendlesham forest.

If someone wants to posit that the gyrotron wasn't in the forest but some distance away, like near the lighthouse which had a power source, note any plasma heating will be most likely closest to the gyrotron where the power is the highest.

The reason it works remotely to heat human tissue is because of the dielectric properties of the water molecules in the skin, so as long as there's no moisture in the way it can heat human skin at a distance, but generating plasma is something else and I've seen no hypothesis for how a gyrotron could generate plasma at a distance, though it could certainly do so close to the gyrotron.

I would also point out the "skin effect" of higher frequency microwaves mentioned in the article I cited. Your microwave at home probably uses 2.45 gigahertz frequency and may penetrate human tissue with heating effect up to 20 millimeters or so, while the 100 kW active denial system in the article operated at 95 gigahertz and only heated up skin to a depth of "less than half a millimeter". This is perfectly consistent with electromagnetic theory which predicts the higher the frequency, the shallower the penetration.

To address terahertz frequency, that's roughly 11 times the 95 gigahertz demonstration so it would heat skin to even less depth, so with such shallow penetration it's really hard to make any sense out of Kit Green's statements about Terahertz radiation having effects on the heart, if the heart is still inside a person's chest. Now maybe if you cut open a person for open heart surgery and aimed some terahertz radiation directly at the heart it would have some effects, but I just am not seeing how it makes sense in the Rendlesham Forest incident where nobody would have had their hearts directly exposed like that. It seems like at higher frequencies the penetration of the heating effect gets shallower and shallower which is clearly seen by how much shallower the higher frequency active denial system penetrates tissue than your microwave oven at home.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Hey Arby, I would have to dig for the source I found (non RFI) but essentially the injury occurs in specific cases whereby the emissions enter the heart chambers and reverberate. The good thing about this explaination is that means a classical physics explaination is viable.



posted on Oct, 4 2017 @ 03:22 PM
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a reply to: AdamE

There is also this commentary



Ex-agent reveals KGB mind control techniques

...Boris Ratnikov, who served in the KGB department for Moscow and the Moscow Region, told Rossiiskaya Gazeta that people in power had resorted to various methods of manipulating individuals' thoughts..

Ratnikov, who subsequently served as deputy head and then senior consultant at the Federal Guard Service from 1991 to 1997, said his department was in charge of safeguarding top officials in post-Soviet Russia against any external influence on their sub-conscious.

The general stated emphatically that he and his colleagues had never manipulated the minds of the then president, Boris Yeltsin, or of economic reformer Yegor Gaidar but claimed to have used mind-reading to save Russia's first president and the country from a war with China.

Yeltsin had planned to visit Japan in 1992 but Ratnikov's department detected attempts to 'program' the president's mind to make him give the Kuril Islands back to Japan.... Yeltsin therefore had to cancel the trip...

In the early 1990s, Ratnikov and his colleagues "scanned" the mind of new U.S. Ambassador Robert Strauss to see that the embassy building contained equipment to exert psychotronic influence on Moscow residents but it had been deactivated...

In further comments on the psychotronic weapon, Ratnikov said that although Russia, the United States and other countries had the necessary technology, it was dangerous to use it because the operator of the weapon and even the person who gave the orders could suddenly fall gravely ill or even die.

Source : Sputnik



I am not so sure they weren't slowly turning Yeltsin crazy for laughs whilst they fine tuned things.



Recently the magic really began to work across water, big water, ocean water.



See what I did there!

But joking apart (or was I?
)

We are aware that a British scientist arrived just after the main RFI events occurred on an officially funded project to study a 'plasma physics' in the area. There were international tensions in Poland and Iran which were still to be resolved. Was something else in the mix?

There have been mentions of mind control on the various men involved afterwards. There is also an awful lot of documents from the time that shows the USSR and the USA were messing about in those fields. Is there anything out there that nails it down to what happened in a Suffolk forest? Because so far all we have is circumstantial evidence at best.
edit on 4/10/17 by mirageman because: edit



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 01:32 AM
link   

originally posted by: mirageman
a reply to: AdamE

There is also this commentary



Ex-agent reveals KGB mind control techniques

...Boris Ratnikov, who served in the KGB department for Moscow and the Moscow Region, told Rossiiskaya Gazeta that people in power had resorted to various methods of manipulating individuals' thoughts..

Ratnikov, who subsequently served as deputy head and then senior consultant at the Federal Guard Service from 1991 to 1997, said his department was in charge of safeguarding top officials in post-Soviet Russia against any external influence on their sub-conscious.

The general stated emphatically that he and his colleagues had never manipulated the minds of the then president, Boris Yeltsin, or of economic reformer Yegor Gaidar but claimed to have used mind-reading to save Russia's first president and the country from a war with China.

Yeltsin had planned to visit Japan in 1992 but Ratnikov's department detected attempts to 'program' the president's mind to make him give the Kuril Islands back to Japan.... Yeltsin therefore had to cancel the trip...

In the early 1990s, Ratnikov and his colleagues "scanned" the mind of new U.S. Ambassador Robert Strauss to see that the embassy building contained equipment to exert psychotronic influence on Moscow residents but it had been deactivated...

In further comments on the psychotronic weapon, Ratnikov said that although Russia, the United States and other countries had the necessary technology, it was dangerous to use it because the operator of the weapon and even the person who gave the orders could suddenly fall gravely ill or even die.

Source : Sputnik



I am not so sure they weren't slowly turning Yeltsin crazy for laughs whilst they fine tuned things.



Recently the magic really began to work across water, big water, ocean water.



See what I did there!

But joking apart (or was I?
)

We are aware that a British scientist arrived just after the main RFI events occurred on an officially funded project to study a 'plasma physics' in the area. There were international tensions in Poland and Iran which were still to be resolved. Was something else in the mix?

There have been mentions of mind control on the various men involved afterwards. There is also an awful lot of documents from the time that shows the USSR and the USA were messing about in those fields. Is there anything out there that nails it down to what happened in a Suffolk forest? Because so far all we have is circumstantial evidence at best.


Copied from facebook....
In answer to the question asked about what could the tunnels be used for at bawdsey if they were shooting energy down them? ... I would suggest this - a plasma antenna ... the whole tunnel would become a huge smart antenna that can work a bit like a phased array? perfect for SDI stuff, satellite and submarine/naval comms, regards, Win.
en.wikipedia.org...
Plasma antenna - Wikipedia
A plasma antenna is a type of radio antenna currently in development in which plasma is used instead of the metal elements of a traditional antenna.[1] A plasma antenna can be used for both transmission and reception.[2] Although plasma antennas have only become practical in recent years, the idea i...

As soon as the plasma generator is switched off, the plasma returns to a non conductive gas and therefore becomes effectively invisible to radar.
They can be dynamically tuned and reconfigured for frequency, direction, bandwidth, gain and beamwidth, so replacing the need for multiple antennas.
They are resistant to electronic warfare.
At satellite frequencies, they exhibit much less thermal noise and are capable of faster data rates



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 03:43 AM
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Some information that may be relevent

Applications
 Weapons System Division has been studying the concept of
using plasma columns for antennas
 The plasma antenna's advantages over conventional metal
elements are most obvious in military applications where
stealth and electronic warfare are primary concerns
 The antenna is only energized for a very short time as
communication takes place
 Other important military factors are weight, size and the
ability to reconfigure
 Shipboard/submarine antenna replacements
 Unmanned air vehicle sensor antennas

users.rowan.edu...



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 05:28 AM
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I wonder why John Burroughs cannot go into things directly on here?
Strange if you ask me, as he follows this page and shares over the info?


edit on 5-10-2017 by Baablacksheep because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 07:35 AM
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a reply to: AdamE

That's some interesting speculation.

Do you think this sort of activity could all be part of tests before Reagan announced the SDI project officially?

We know that certain elements of research went on in that area of the UK. The numerical advantage of the Warsaw Pact's manpower and military hardware meant the US military was looking to gain an advantage in space if it could. In fact it always has been and still is. However this is always complicated by the current and future political, economic and geopolitical situations that arise.



Ultimately the SDI project seemed to have been big on claims yet ultimately flawed. It has even been linked to another conspiracy. .

But back in 1980 the project had not even been announced publicly and it's possible some things were being tested out. Some further digging might turn up some clearer information on all of this but my gut instinct is that it will be difficult to find.



posted on Oct, 5 2017 @ 02:06 PM
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Some further digging might turn up some clearer information on all of this but my gut instinct is that it will be difficult to find.


But not impossible.....

Very interesting graphics....







posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 06:36 AM
link   

originally posted by: mirageman
a reply to: AdamE

That's some interesting speculation.

Do you think this sort of activity could all be part of tests before Reagan announced the SDI project officially?

We know that certain elements of research went on in that area of the UK. The numerical advantage of the Warsaw Pact's manpower and military hardware meant the US military was looking to gain an advantage in space if it could. In fact it always has been and still is. However this is always complicated by the current and future political, economic and geopolitical situations that arise.



Ultimately the SDI project seemed to have been big on claims yet ultimately flawed. It has even been linked to another conspiracy. .

But back in 1980 the project had not even been announced publicly and it's possible some things were being tested out. Some further digging might turn up some clearer information on all of this but my gut instinct is that it will be difficult to find.


I have some more speculation from the following documents. I emphasis NNEMP and RAKER for now.

www.margaretthatcher.org...


One of the simplest EMP generators is simply a pulsed high-power radio transmitter. This is the principle behind the HERF gun, a High Energy Radio Frequency weapon that has been proposed for uses such as stopping vehicles by disabling their electronic ignitions.

Were there any located at Orford ness or nearby? (Black Beacon?)

Does RAKER refer to a Rake receiver?

A rake receiver is a radio receiver designed to counter the effects of multipath fading.
(for use in wireless communication)

Due to the functionality of the Rake Receiver, this may have been stationed at Martlesham Heath and BT?

In a Global Positioning System receiver, Multipath Effect can cause a stationary receiver's output to indicate as if it were randomly jumping about or creeping. When the unit is moving the jumping or creeping may be hidden, but it still degrades the displayed accuracy of location and speed.

The GPS was being developed to guide a missile to its target (MR, Feb 1980) according to a document I am in the possession of.

Was there a test or problem with the system?

Was it trying to guide a drone?

If the Soviets were bombarding to East Coast or even the Bases with Microwave energy, would this play any part in disrupting the system, like side lobe jamming?



posted on Oct, 6 2017 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: AdamE

No thoughts on SHINGLE? I’m surprised you didn’t pick up on that. After all, what really happened at Shingle Street could well be involved.



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 03:20 AM
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originally posted by: ctj83
a reply to: AdamE

No thoughts on SHINGLE? I’m surprised you didn’t pick up on that. After all, what really happened at Shingle Street could well be involved.


Hi ctj83. Is it this you are refering to?


BBC -Report von James Hayward (2002):
The Bodies on the Beach
The isolated village of Shingle Street stands on a wild and desolate stretch of Suffolk coastline, twelve miles east of Ipswich. Many maps omit the village, with some justification, for visitors will find few amenities there. Its public house, the Lifeboat Inn, was flattened by scientists from Porton Down almost 60 years ago, and today many of the houses are fairweather holiday homes.
Yet Shingle Street is surrounded by mystery. To the north lies Orfordness. A secret site since the First World War, the island has played host to a bewildering variety of hush-hush military installations, including an RAF experimental flying field, and in 1935, the first Air Ministry radar station. Post-war residents included the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment.
In 1993 Orfordness - half wilderness, half military junkyard - was sold to the National Trust by the Ministry of Defence for £3 million.
A few miles to the south, on the mouth of River Deben, stands Bawdsey Manor. This striking neo-Jacobian pile succeeded Orfordness as a radar research station in 1936, and during the Second World War it remained an operational Chain Home site. The last of the four 350 ft steel masts was demolished in 2000, and the manor now houses an international school.
Sandwiched between Bawdsey and Orfordness at the centre of Hollesley Bay, the village of Shingle Street also boasts a secret history. At the Public Record Office lies a slim, yellowing Ministry of Home Security dossier detailing 'Evacuation of civil population from the village of Shingle Street in East Suffolk.' Indexed as HO 207/1175, at one time its content was to have remained an Official Secret until 2021.
For decades this inexplicable secrecy boggled minds across East Anglia. It was all to do with a secret bomb, some hinted. Others found room for the Ultra secret.
Then, in 1992, allegations that a German raiding force was burned to death there in 1940 exploded across the national press. The rumours soon spread to include fatal chemical warfare trials and a friendly-fire disaster in 1944.
The result was the kind of undignified media scramble spurred by the Hitler Diaries, involving public outcry, the tabling of questions in the House of Commons, and the early declassification of HO 207/1175. All of which went some way towards proving that the reality of Shingle Street's wartime past was rather more prosaic.
After France fell in June 1940, Minister of Home Security, Sir John Anderson, created a coastal Defence Area between Southend- on-Sea and King's Lynn. In East Anglia alone, no less than 127,000 people left coastal towns to make way for the construction of an extensive network of fixed defences, including deadly minefields.
In line with this policy the Regional Commissioner for the Eastern Region, Will Spens, ordered the complete evacuation of Shingle Street on 22nd June 1940. Villagers had just three days to find alternative accommodation, most moving inland to Hollesley and Alderton.
With just one lorry to assist in the hasty exodus, villagers were able to remove only bare essentials, and many larger chattels such as furniture had to be left behind. Sadly, over the next few months extensive looting took place.
Tom Abram, a private with The Liverpool Scottish entrenched at Bawdsey East Lane, recalls the humdrum routine of coastal defence during the invasion summer of 1940:
"There was a profound lack of action. In June and later on we had to Stand To from sunset to dawn with orders to hold on at all costs. Although there were constant warnings about imminent invasion the only German we saw was a dead airman who we fished out of the sea and carried back to camp on a hurdle."
The German flyer, washed ashore at Bawdsey on 30th October, belonged to the same crew as a second man found nearby on the same day, a third at Shingle Street on the 29th, and a fourth at Aldeburgh on the 27th. All four had been in the water for almost a month, after their Heinkel 111 crashed into the North Sea on October 4th.
This sad quartet, the only Germans officially acknowledged as having landed near Shingle Street during the Second World War, were buried in Ipswich.
Given the heightened tension of 1940, their numbers were no doubt exaggerated and played a part in establishing the Shingle Street myth. Although Hitler postponed Operation Sealion indefinitely on 17th September 1940, the threat of invasion was by no means ended. Eight days later, on the 25th, the War Diary of the army unit defending Hollesley Bay recorded: 'a letter from 55 Division stating that a scheme was afoot to produce an impenetrable barrage of flame on the sea to prevent or destroy enemy ships attempting a landing
The following day the Brigade dispatched a reply, suggesting flame barrages off the following localities:
a) Bawdsey 8057
b) Mouth of River Deben 7855
c) Mouth of River Orwell 7249
d) Felixstowe, from Ferry 7755 to Landguard Fort 7350
The extraordinary history of flame barrages and the Petroleum Warfare Department is recounted in detail in my book "The Bodies on the Beach"
Although none were installed further north than Shoeburyness, this curious instruction is not without significance, for in fact it formed part of a highly successful black propaganda exercise co-ordinated by MI6, SOE and the Directorate of Military Intelligence.
Launched at a time when Britain faced invasion almost undefended, these several potent rumours held first that a small German landing had been repulsed, and later that a large invasion flotilla had been bombed and incinerated halfway across the Channel, resulting in anything between 30,000 and 80,000 dead.
Variants of these Chinese whispers spread like wildfire, particularly in Occupied Europe and America, and inevitably filtered back to Britain.
Indeed the Chief Press Censor, Rear-Admiral George Thomson, would later recall:
"In the whole course of the war there was no story which gave me so much trouble as this one of the attempted German invasion, flaming oil on the water and 30,000 burned Germans."
In September 1942 events at Shingle Street took a more sinister turn. At this time the Chemical Defence Research Establishment at Porton Down were casting around for land and buildings on which to test a new device, and were offered Shingle Street.
The device was an experimental 250 lb bomb which combined liquid mustard with high explosive, and was eventually dropped on 28th March 1943.

edit on 7-10-2017 by AdamE because: tired!



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 07:27 AM
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a reply to: AdamE

My interpretation of the document you linked is that it was mainly talk about minimizing any advantage that the Warsaw Pact could gain by deploying Laser Sensor Damage Weapons (L.S.D.W).



RAKER was the research programme and the SHINGLE the development project. I think it's as simple as that. Sometimes it helps and sometimes it doesn't by trying to read between the lines.

It's also notable that even by 1983, good weather conditions were vital to the deployment of such weapons



There is also an expression of concern about EMP weapons being developed by the Soviets. Although this was seen as a less immediate threat.

Now, with this information being over two years after the RFI, what does all of this amount to in relation to what happened in the forest?


edit on 7/10/17 by mirageman because: clarification



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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It appears that the binary is been pushed once again.
As well as the notebook etc.

www.facebook.com...

I still do not see any explanations by Jim re the
co-ordinates having been lifted from Sacred-Destinations?

One would think by now this would be explained ? Yes?

I also see no further dates re the pending definitive book.

But there is info out there which suggest there is now
a series of books been written according to Gary Osborn.

How does it all fit with all the latest discussions here on ATS?

The other news is that Andrew Pike is re-releasing his book
and with updates, pretty soon by the sounds of this.

edit on 7-10-2017 by Baablacksheep because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2017 @ 04:15 PM
link   

originally posted by: mirageman
a reply to: AdamE

My interpretation of the document you linked is that it was mainly talk about minimizing any advantage that the Warsaw Pact could gain by deploying Laser Sensor Damage Weapons (L.S.D.W).



RAKER was the research programme and the SHINGLE the development project. I think it's as simple as that. Sometimes it helps and sometimes it doesn't by trying to read between the lines.

It's also notable that even by 1983, good weather conditions were vital to the deployment of such weapons



There is also an expression of concern about EMP weapons being developed by the Soviets. Although this was seen as a less immediate threat.

Now, with this information being over two years after the RFI, what does all of this amount to in relation to what happened in the forest?


I really appreciate your assessment of the document and point taken.

As I mentioned it was speculation!
Reference to the actual deployment of a laser sensor damage weapons ('___'W) device in 1982, when we are only seeing these types of devices 30+ years after the events.

These fall under the term 'Directed Energy Weapons'

The testing of which may have been carried out in the years proceeding at places near to the bases?

Apparently there were places nearby that dealt with such testing?

Agreed that it needs good weather for these to work adequately.

Microwaves/Masers, infrared and X-Ray lasers were all in the mix to alleviate some of the problems encountered along the way.

With much of this, unless we have the truth, much amounts to speculation.
And the sharing and talking of information helps to iron out some of the many creases that lie within.

And a very good thread if you don't mind me saying.



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