Utah on track to end homelessness...

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posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 02:26 AM
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Apparently Utah is taking the humanistic approach to their homeless problem and it's working.

Over the past 8 years they have already reduced homelessness by 78% in their state. They did the numbers and realized that it is cheaper to help them to become self sufficient than pay for their ER visits and jail stays.

Today's American will cry about 'handouts' and 'entitlements' and whatever other popular newspeak the kids are using these days.....but the proof is in the pudding. It's working!



www.nationswell.com...

Personally, I think this is what we are supposed to do for fellow human beings that need a helping hand.

I did a search and didn't see this anywhere. If I missed it, apologies. So ATS, what do you think?




posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 02:41 AM
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reply to post by intelligenthoodlum33
 


Alright, go Utah!

Sounds like some basic logic has finally applied itself in the US, about time. Good for them.

Now if this catches on nationally maybe we can pull out of the tailspin we've been in for so long.



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 02:45 AM
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reply to post by Bassago
 


My thoughts exactly. Apparently Casper, Wyoming is following suit soon. Who knows...maybe the American Dream isn't dead after all.



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 02:51 AM
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intelligenthoodlum33
Apparently Utah is taking the humanistic approach to their homeless problem and it's working.

Over the past 8 years they have already reduced homelessness by 78% in their state. They did the numbers and realized that it is cheaper to help them to become self sufficient than pay for their ER visits and jail stays.

Today's American will cry about 'handouts' and 'entitlements' and whatever other popular newspeak the kids are using these days.....but the proof is in the pudding. It's working!



www.nationswell.com...

Personally, I think this is what we are supposed to do for fellow human beings that need a helping hand.

I did a search and didn't see this anywhere. If I missed it, apologies. So ATS, what do you think?




I think it is about time and not a surprise of this state. Polygamy is a bitch and they are overdue by my count by the Lost Boys alone:

en.wikipedia.org...

I could go on.



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 04:02 AM
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intelligenthoodlum33


Today's American will cry about 'handouts' and 'entitlements'


I really dont know what people mean when they critise 'handouts' and 'entitlements.' Are they talking about the handouts and entitlements given to individuals or corporations?

I am always confused when they talk about welfare. Is it corporate welfare they are taking about or are they taking about welfare for individuals???
edit on 22-12-2013 by learnatic because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 08:55 AM
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First Utah legalize gay marriage, now they're actually helping the homeless? Wow, this state is looking better and better!

This is what I've been saying for years. One way or another, tax payers are going to pay for the people at the bottom of the ladder. We can either do it by paying for the legal costs to try, convict, and jail them, pay for their hospital bills, etc.

Or, we can do like Jesus taught us to do. Help those who are less fortunate than us. Don't just give them a handout and walk away, but take the time to learn why they're in the position they're in, and help find a solution.

I recently went through a sales training program at work. Something that struck me as profound was a lesson about needs.

Our instructor told the story of a man who's finished basement had flooded, and asked us what the man needed. There was a lot of answers. A wet/dry vac. New drywall. Mold and mildew prevention. A sump pump, and so on.

The instructor then informed us that what the man needed was a clean, dry basement. What we had done was offered solutions.

If we all shift the way we think to look at the need, and work towards a solution from there, we would be better off.



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 09:51 AM
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I read about this the other day. It's a simply incredible story!

I'm a Brit, and am sometimes critical of America on here - but stories like this that remind me that American generosity and determination can achieve almost anything!

I've no idea how practical this approach is for nationwide use - or indeed here in the UK - but any Western country, state, city that isn't seriously looking at Utah to see if this could work for their homeless community is quite simply doing it's taxpayers and voters a serious disservice.

Well done, Utah!



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 11:23 AM
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For years I have seen homeless people out in the cold this time of year. The coldest it has gotten here this year is -40 degrees F! There is a homeless shelter here, and this time of year there are usually not enough beds at the shelter for them.

At one time I must admit that I was a homeless person as well. I only had my vehicle to live in. ATS should know that living in a vehicle is often more expensive than to live in a rented property. Why you ask? In the wintertime it gets SO cold that a person out in the cold would need at least a vehicle with a good heater they can start up every couple of hours to be able to survive. They have found homeless people dead in the spring time in the past.

More power to Utah! I hope more states in the USA start to realize that giving these people a chance will only make our nation stronger. S+F




posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 12:31 PM
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The American dream.
To have someone else take care of you because you can't or won't care for yourself.

It's not "working."

It's just more convenient to pay lodging for them than it is to hold people responsible and require accountability.
"Yay! We're paying less money to keep the vagrants out of our hair."
It's a nice idea but it simply enables uselessness.

Is that a mean thing to say?
Maybe, but it's true.

It's like painting over rust.
It looks nice on the surface but the rust continues to spread.

Go ahead and bash.
You aren't helping them. You are providing another route for people to escape from responsibility.



edit on 22-12-2013 by badgerprints because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 12:57 PM
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badgerprints
The American dream.
To have someone else take care of you because you can't or won't care for yourself.

It's not "working."


Oh well sorry, "Mr. I had life go so well for me that I don't understand the less fortunate".

Total self fulfillment is an illusion, people helped you get up there because they had charity in their views.

Think back on your first job ever, I can 100% bet that it was either given to you by a contact or that the boss was charitable enough to give you a chance.

But I know you won't understand a word I'm saying, being totally oblivious to life itself.

Go Utah! People need help to get back up in society and helping them is profitable in the long run compared to letting them in the streets.



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by badgerprints
 


I was lucky enough to have family to turn to when I was down on my finances. You didn't get there only by yourself. Nobody did. You must have asked for help somewhere along the line. Did dad or mom help you go to school? Even if you did it all by yourself with blood sweat and tears, your wife or your family must have helped you somewhere along the way.

Sometimes it is not best to judge people. Have you put yourself in their shoes? What if you lost your job, your house was foreclosed upon by the bank, you lost your car because of not being able to pay the lease, your phone got disconnected, and while you were returning your car to the dealership, you get in an accident and have over $160,000 of medical bills that you cannot pay all of a sudden?

That's a hypothetical situation, but it happens to people every day. The case that made me homeless was that a decent-paying job that I had packed up and left the state. I had phone bill, interent, rent, car insurance to pay all of a sudden with no job. I'm thankful that I had someone to help me a little when I needed it. I was only homeless for about 3 months. What happens to the people that do not have any help? Many times those are the people you see on the street.



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 01:37 PM
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Seems like a great idea and they should be applauded.

In reading the article it didn't really say what the follow up plan was other than giving them a case worker.

My hope is they would put a limit, 2-3 years, on how long someone could live there for free while providing training, schooling, counselling and job opportunities. Anyone they move into these apartments should come out of them in a couple of years as a different person. This should be a way for people to find themselves and define their own future vs a free ride.

Sometimes all you need is a small measure of peace and chance to start over.
edit on 2013pAmerica/Chicago3101ppm by opethPA because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 01:51 PM
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This is exactly what I always wanted to do if I ever got super rich - give a home and in return that person would pay the taxes, do the upkeep, etc. I always thought there would need to be more to it (can't endlessly just give away homes) but it appears it is working for this State.

I'm so glad to hear something is finally being done. We had a severe cold snap where I live a couple of weeks ago (below 50 in some places with windchill). All I could think of were the homeless. I wondered - would the shelters still turn them away when full? So many of our homeless (where I live), are mentally ill, veterans, or have another disability. No one should be without shelter. It's like no one should be without heat and food.



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 04:29 PM
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InFriNiTee
reply to post by badgerprints
 


Sometimes it is not best to judge people. Have you put yourself in their shoes? What if you lost your job, your house was foreclosed upon by the bank, you lost your car because of not being able to pay the lease, your phone got disconnected, and while you were returning your car to the dealership, you get in an accident and have over $160,000 of medical bills that you cannot pay all of a sudden?

That's a hypothetical situation, but it happens to people every day.


This is spot on and not hypothetical at all. I know it for a fact and lived it. All but the medical bill part, that catastrophe came from a different direction.

The fact is we spend more than $600 billion a year on the MIC. The least we should be able to do is insure that our citizens don't freeze to death in a gutter at night. Regardless of who "they" are we are better than that. We should be anyway.



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 06:09 PM
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InFriNiTee

Sometimes it is not best to judge people. Have you put yourself in their shoes?


I've been in their shoes.
I made a choice to be something else.
I don't judge the homeless.
I judge the society that creates them and then keeps them dependent upon others by enabling the behavior.



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 06:18 PM
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theMediator

badgerprints
The American dream.
To have someone else take care of you because you can't or won't care for yourself.

It's not "working."


Oh well sorry, "Mr. I had life go so well for me that I don't understand the less fortunate".



I understand them all too well. I've been quite "unfortunate" in my time.
Have you ever slept under hedges next to an abandoned building full of very scary individuals, wrapped up in a scrap of old carpet and hoping nobody finds you or steals your stuff? I have.
I have been homeless and broke with no job and all of my possessions in a duffle bag.
I decided it wouldn't define me and my life.
Like I said, I don't judge the unfortunate. I judge the society that enables them.

It's amazing how everyone instantly connects my comments with success and an easy life.
Nobody seems to connect responsibility and accountability with the basic ability to provide for ones self.

This program is cheaper and gets rid of the visible symptoms of homelessness but that's about it.
Like putting a band aid on cancer.
Just cover it up so we can all feel good about ourselves.

Sorry I can't be on the cheer leading squad.
I'm not that guy.
edit on 22-12-2013 by badgerprints because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 06:29 PM
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Just cover it up? My God! It brings immediate life and comfort, dignity to all those who are currently being tortured to death in the enivronment.

What bandaid? For what, for the musical chairs economic banking slavery? Its a crime against all souls and beyond evil and sin.

THe world and all its resources belong to all of us equally, PERIOD. No planet that is not a hellzone treats its citizens like slaves.

Money itself is a crime against all souls.

There should not be homeless. Most are mentally ill. You don't do that to the ill!



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 06:37 PM
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Unity_99


There should not be homeless. Most are mentally ill. You don't do that to the ill!


No. There should not be homeless.

Unfortunately, society continues to enable those who won't care for themselves.

Some are mentally ill and should be in treatment and counseling.

Most are capable of providing for themselves but do not.

Like I said,
This program is cheaper and removes the visible problem but it does not solve it.
It enables the behavior.



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 07:49 PM
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This is like putting a bandaid on a cut when you have cancer. I applaud the gesture given to those that are homeless for whatever reason. Cuts need to heal but when do you start dealing with the cancer?



posted on Dec, 22 2013 @ 07:53 PM
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badgerprints
removes the visible problem but it does not solve it.
It enables the behavior.


Agreed and like I said..their needs to be training or opportunities to come out of this..just not a free ride enabling the cycle to continue.





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