More bad news for Target shoppers: Hacked credit card numbers now on black market

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posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 12:19 PM
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The credit and debit card numbers were selling in batches of 1 million cards, for as little as $20 to a high of $100 per card, according to KrebsOnSecurity, a website run by cyber-security reporter Brian Krebs.




More bad news for Target shoppers: Hacked credit card numbers now on black market

Let me start by saying... if you were one of the 40 million target customers you need to talk to your banks right fricken now...

naturally this has all happened before what makes this one different is how fast those card numbers were put on the market... that and it's all going down so fast that even if they backtrack the ISP's for those selling and buying most of these guys will be long gone, with your numbers, in the blink of an eye, or should we say, click of a mouse..

Target say's that customers will not be responsible for paying any fraudulent charges applied to their accounts. But they do not say to what end. Meaning, its pretty easy to stop payment on a credit card, but if some bad guy has already cleaned out your Debit account will Target replace all that lost money???

Well there it is and if you click on the thumbnail you can see a screenshot of those stolen cards listed for sale




posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 12:38 PM
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Let me start by saying... if you were one of the 40 million target customers you need to talk to your banks right fricken now...


" Absolutely !!! "

The safest option going forward would be to "CANCEL" the existing Account-Number AND "RE-ISSUE" a new "Account-Number".

The "END-STORY" to all of this will be nothing less than ... "INTERESTING" ( to say the least ).



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by FarleyWayne
 


It's not at all hard to do...
Few years back my ex-wife ripped off my bank cards...
All it took was a phone call... didn't even have to close my account... they just deactivated the old cards and reissued new ones...

Of course I had to go a couple weeks without plastic... but hey... Better than getting royally screwed right



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by HardCorps
 


I don't think it would take a couple of weeks ... I've had to do this several times across several years and I was only without a working card for 5-Business-Days.

HOWEVER

40 MILLION CARDS !?!?!? ... spread across the CARD-VENDORS ... could cause some extra delay ... ( plus imagine the phone delays relating to caller volume ??? ).

-
Sentiment: Don't Delay ... ( calling your card vendor )



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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Gee, if I were a conspiracy theorist, I would wonder if this was all a scheme to get people to stop using electronic money...

especially when not only could your card be used to pay for things you didn't get, but could also be used to clean out your bank account (not covered by insurance or card companies, right?)

And/or could it be a roundabout way to bring down the banks?

Turns out the best way to rob a bank is not to own one, but to get access to the code numbers.



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 12:59 PM
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signalfire
Gee, if I were a conspiracy theorist, I would wonder if this was all a scheme to get people to stop using electronic money...
...
And/or could it be a roundabout way to bring down the banks?


I MUST ... "Politely Disagree".

AND/OR

More "Credibly" ... An "Attack on TARGET" ??? . . . ( i.e. TARGET-Customer destruction )
edit on 21-12-2013 by FarleyWayne because: added ... "TARGET-Customer destruction"



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 01:14 PM
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Most banks, if you can prove that you were a victim of identity / card theft, will replace the money back in your account, because they know that their cards, and the whole electronic system of money, is inherently risky.

I had my debit card copied when I drove through a Taco Bell on my lunch hour about 6 years ago. I found out because the next day, I tried to use it and it was rejected for lack of funds. I filed a police report, contacted the bank, found out that the card was used in a town about 100 miles south at a Walgreen's to purchase a bunch of $100 visa gift cards, and my money was returned to my account by the bank, who had to absorb the loss.

However, a rip off of this magnitude may mean that it's going to take a while for everybody to get their money back, and new cards issued.

Seems to me that this could be used as an push for RFID chips.....just run your hand over the scanner and your account is automatically debited. Just a thought.
edit on 21-12-2013 by FissionSurplus because: clarification



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 01:29 PM
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The news isn't all bad; Target is offering a 10% discount over this weekend to make amends.


"We recognize this has been confusing and disruptive during an already busy holiday season," Target CEO Gregg Steinhafel said in a statement Friday. "Our guests' trust is our top priority at Target and we are committed to making this right."


I know I'll be there < /sarcasm >

I know they had to say something, but jeez!



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 01:37 PM
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FissionSurplusSeems to me that this could be used as an push for RFID chips.....just run your hand over the scanner and your account is automatically debited. Just a thought.
edit on 21-12-2013 by FissionSurplus because: clarification


"RFID chips" ???

There are BOTH ... "Read-Only" "RFID chips" ... AND ... "Read-Write" "RFID chips".

Since "RFID chips" COULD/CAN be COPY'd ??? ... Same thing could happen as is happening with Debit/Credit-CARDs.

AND/OR

SUMMARY: "RFID chips" = NO SOLUTION.



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 01:42 PM
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reply to post by FarleyWayne
 


That may be true, but this type of scenario could be used to sell people on a slightly different technology, which was my point. The only true solution is to go back to cash, but people could be convinced, out of fear, that RFID is "safer".



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 01:48 PM
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FissionSurplus
reply to post by FarleyWayne
 

but people could be convinced, out of fear, that RFID is "safer".

AND

There LAYS ... "The 'Scary' Picture" ... AND ... I can't disagree with your "Suspicion".

HOWEVER

Sentiment: I don't think it would be difficult to "RE-EDUCATE"? ... ( the FUTILITY / FALLACY of "that RFID is '"safer"' ).
edit on 21-12-2013 by FarleyWayne because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 01:55 PM
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Sentiment: I don't think it would be difficult to "RE-EDUCATE"? ... ( the FUTILITY / FALLACY of "that RFID is '"safer"' ).
reply to post by FarleyWayne
 

Do you honestly think that most people would be re-educated as to what RFID can and cannot do by TPTB? Anyway, it's just a thought, I don't want to derail the OP's thread.

Bottom line: Thousands of Target shoppers got screwed, and Target is still not forthcoming as to how this occurred....and if it happened once, it sure as hell could happen again.



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 02:58 PM
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signalfire
Gee, if I were a conspiracy theorist, I would wonder if this was all a scheme to get people to stop using electronic money...

especially when not only could your card be used to pay for things you didn't get, but could also be used to clean out your bank account (not covered by insurance or card companies, right?)

And/or could it be a roundabout way to bring down the banks?

Turns out the best way to rob a bank is not to own one, but to get access to the code numbers.


1. No, everyone has been trying to switch to electronic funds. It's easier and less paperwork. No data entry, as in… people's entire purchase history can be brought up in a click. Also they can do different analyses on the data.

2. Not really true either. Most of the credit card companies actually have a really good system for fraud and the card holder is not liable. Which is the way it should be, since it's their card or the retailers system that isn't secure.

3. The bank is liable but also insured for this kind of thing, and it again, is their responsibility if they let someone take something entrusted to them, which most of them clear up rather quickly because too much bad press about something like this kills their image.


The good news is, my bank and PayPal restored every penny within a few days and the bank removed the overdraft charges. They were enormously helpful (they told me they see this happen at least once a week). In the end, other than temporarily shattered nerves and a serious case of paranoia, I lost nothing. - See more at: thebesttimes.com...


thebesttimes.com...

A number of hedge funds were swindled out of a half billion dollars a few years ago, not to mention the big debit and credit scams that come every few months or so. You don't hear squat from them, because the more people losing money in their institutions, the more people who won't want to deposit their funds with them. Which means the less leverage they have for how they really make money.



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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There are laws governing eCommerce sites that hold payment info on site. That why the big boys get most of the business. Good that they have to cover the problem they let happen.



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by roadgravel
 


My brother shopped at Target around black friday and used a credit card. Today he was slapped with $400 in unauthorized charges.

Whoever stole the CC numbers are most certainly using them.



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by jrod
 

I made a couple of credit purchases at Target during the target period.
Nothing on my card so far.

I check my account every two days so if anything shows up the bank will be hearing from me instantly. They're actually pretty good about observing my buying habits though. They got in touch with me once when I made some purchases from locations out of my neck of the woods, just to confirm they were legit.
edit on 12/21/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 04:15 PM
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For anyone who has one of these cards you can in many states put a freeze on all three of your credit reports. It costs 10 bucks each, so 30 in total.

That prevents anyone from using your name/ssn to open any new lines of credit.

If they try and use your information to open a loan the banks being applied to will see nothing on your credit report but a notice that there is a freeze. So at that point they will deny the loan.

This is the best method of preventing yourself from being a victim of identity theft.

edit on 21-12-2013 by OrphanApology because: D



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 05:41 PM
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In general, the push is to move the general public towards using credit for everything. Credit cards have a whole lot more protection than debit does. About 6 months before grandma died, someone stole her debit card physically somehow(she didn't know how to turn on a computer, let alone shop online). It has an RFID chip in it, so it could have been physically stolen from a distance. Anyways, she had to prove the didn't go to Toronto and buy a bunch of overpriced brandname sneakers, which wasn't that hard at least, she was in hospital at the time of purchases. They had told her if it was a credit card, it would have been immediately vindicated without having to prove her innocence. If it was a credit card it would have had been the other way around, the vendors would have had to prove she had been there shopping to get the reversal reversed again in their favor.



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 06:12 PM
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I almost think this is an inside job. There are 1778 stores in the US. There are a few in Canada, were those hit? Anyway, how could someone get all the Target stores information unless it is all held in one location? I didn't think any stores held there data all in one location.



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by StoutBroux
 



My brother was shopping at a Target in Brevard County, Fl. I'm not sure which store. I think he may have been using his debit card because he is short on funds this weekend thanks to this fiasco.

I didn't know that fraud charges were much tougher to fight with a debit card vs credit, that is something I will keep in mind for the future.

I've had one fraud charge on a credit card in the past. It was for a few hundred dollars and Navy Federal took care of it quickly. I did have to fill out a form where I listed the fraud charge and signed that it was unauthorized. Less than a week and everything was back to normal.
edit on 21-12-2013 by jrod because: (no reason given)









 
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