It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Recent Results of Japanese fish radioactivity--It's Safe

page: 2
3
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 08:56 PM
link   
reply to post by Zaphod58
 


The problem Zaph is all of the lies and half truths, As an aviator you are trained to look for the signs of radiation in the atmosphere and the like,this is different. water and solid matter obsorbes this posion, and starfish are just the very first victims, but there are at least 3 uncontrolled cores, millions and millions of contaminated gallons of water in the sea still to this day pouring into the pacific. How can you say it is probally all just ok? the first early warnings are being ignored due to all of the lies....you are better than that....trusting these liars is not the best move...soon you will hear.."if you like your nuclear seafood, you can keep it"




posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 08:59 PM
link   

Tusks
reply to post by Restricted
 


Got numbers? Bq/Kg?


No, no specific numbers. Just caught the name of the isotopes.



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:01 PM
link   
reply to post by teslahowitzer
 


I actually worked for several years with radiation, so I know its affects and what it can do. But the "melting starfish" has been happening for the last 30 years off and on. It's believed to be caused by warm water mixing with the colder water where they live.

It's also happening on the East Coast. It was observed in 2011 and eventually spread from New Jersey to Maine along that shore.


The disease has been noted before, in Southern California back in the mid-‘80s, according to the Santa Rosa Press Democrat. That one nearly wiped out all the starfish in the area during El Niño. But it was always more localized. This outbreak is not only occurring from Orange County to Alaska on the West Coast of the nation.

A University of Rhode Island graduate student first noticed “melting” starfish in 2011 at Narragansett Bay, one of the first sightings of the disease on the East Coast that eventually was noted from New Jersey to Maine. There was speculation in July that a large increase in the starfish population laid the groundwork for a die-off by stressing food sources and increasing the likelihood of disease transmission.

Starfish are also susceptible to bacterial infections, which can be exacerbated by increasingly warmer water, raising questions about whether global warming is playing a role in the outbreak.

www.allgov.com...



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:03 PM
link   

Tusks
reply to post by Restricted
 


Got numbers? Bq/Kg?


I posted this elsewhere, but it is appropriate here:


In this paper we show the relation between distance and contamination levels by inverse regression analysis. The results indicate the effects of quasi radioactive cesium 137 by the Fukushima accident look like less serious than those of the Chernobyl accident. However, contamination levels are possibly higher than the Chernobyl as the cesium is concentrated by the water systems in limitation region. Water paddy field look like shallow pond saved mud included cesium 137. Moreover, the cesium137 will distribute and concentrate by high density irrigation canal and urban water-system. For example, the highly contaminated Taisho river bottom soil Cs134: 4,335 Bq/kg, Cs137: 5,456 Bq/kg was found at 1/11/2011 at Kitakashiwa bridge of Kashiwa city in Tokyo metropolitan area, 200 km south-west from the plant13. Therefore we must carefully and continuously monitor the contamination to the freshwater ecosystem and human health.
emphasis mine

Overview of active cesium contamination of freshwater fish in Fukushima and Eastern Japan




The Japanese freshwater system is very high density as developed rice water paddy field, irrigation canal, urban water-system network. Therefore, we have to think that the contamination of freshwater fish is widespread not only in river basins but also all over the ground included all types of water-systems, for example, agricultural and urban water systems.


It's everywhere if it's in all of the water systems...everywhere


One more time, everywhere

As the decades wear on and the contamination that has already been released bioaccumulates, we will see how far reaching this disaster will some day be. We are still very near the beginning of this scenario and to think we have seen all of what will eventuate from Fukushima Daiichi is to willingly wear blinders provided by those who would rather not take responsibility for the damage wrought.



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:08 PM
link   
reply to post by whitewave
 


That rockfish was caught IN FUKUSHIMA BAY!. Open ocean fish a few Km away were low/safe.

To Pheonix358--the NETC is a bit ridiculous. It has results of high-volume air filters from EPA, ambient air measured by personal monitors, and lord-knows what else. It uses nSv, microSv, and CPM as if they're interchangeable. It's out to get your money and is full of BS. But you're probably paid up.



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:09 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:15 PM
link   
reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 

Nice map, but the US "considered safe" level is 5 times that.



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:20 PM
link   

Staafke
My arse is safe too. Still, it's full of bacteria.


The stuff that is supposed to be there is obviously occupying another cavity.

edit on 10/06/2013 by Tusks because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:24 PM
link   

Tusks
reply to post by whitewave
 


That rockfish was caught IN FUKUSHIMA BAY!. Open ocean fish a few Km away were low/safe.

To Pheonix358--the NETC is a bit ridiculous. It has results of high-volume air filters from EPA, ambient air measured by personal monitors, and lord-knows what else. It uses nSv, microSv, and CPM as if they're interchangeable. It's out to get your money and is full of BS. But you're probably paid up.


So? Do those fish in the bay just evaporate? Or does some other fish eat them working its way up the food chain? There are already reports of children in Japan being born with leukemia, tumors, cancers, (mainly thyroid!, should be a clue) so we know that there is gross contamination. What IS the half life of cesium? I'm fairly sure it's not just 2 years.



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:26 PM
link   
reply to post by whitewave
 


The isotopes are 134 and 137.

134 - 2 years
137 - 30 years
edit on 12/19/2013 by Restricted because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:41 PM
link   
reply to post by Tusks
 





To Pheonix358--the NETC is a bit ridiculous. It has results of high-volume air filters from EPA, ambient air measured by personal monitors, and lord-knows what else. It uses nSv, microSv, and CPM as if they're interchangeable. It's out to get your money and is full of BS. But you're probably paid up.


That was exactly what I expected you to say. The obvious is right in front of your face and you want to convince me that all is well. I do not live in la la land. Fuky is a real world problem. Deny it all you want.

P



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:49 PM
link   
Didn't Japan pass what amounts to severe censorship laws just recently including harsh penalties against whistle blowers? And then this report is being circulated!

Well....their credibility just plummeted. Though I'd love to believe it and that the PTB are just trying to scare humanity off the oceans so it can restock or something.



posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:52 PM
link   
reply to post by Tusks
 


And what is that level today?

What was it before the Fukushima incident?

More grist to grind:


The objective of this study was to measure the concentration of radiocesium 134Cs and 137Cs in the muscle of Japanese monkeys (Macaca fuscata) inhabiting the forest area of Fukushima City and to determine the change in concentration over time as well as the relationship with the level of soil contamination. Cesium concentrations in the muscle of monkeys captured at locations with 100,000–300,000 Bq/m2 were 6,000–25,000 Bq/kg in April 2011 and decreased over 3 months to around 1,000 Bq/kg. However, the concentration increased again to 2,000–3,000 Bq/kg in some animals during and after December 2011 before returning to 1,000 Bq/kg in April 2012, after which it remained relatively constant.


Concentration of Radiocesium in the Wild Japanese Monkey (Macaca fuscata) over the First 15 Months after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster

Guess what, these monkeys live where the people live, so if the monkeys had the elevated leves, do you think it possible that the people did as well?

Here's another map for you since you liked the last one so much:




posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 09:58 PM
link   
reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 


Yeah, the monkeys that lived a mile away from the plant were heavily exposed--and continue to be. But get 30 miles away and the levels are no where near so high. Got any results for monkeys or pigs from such a reasonable distance away?



posted on Dec, 20 2013 @ 05:49 AM
link   

Tusks
reply to post by whitewave
 


That rockfish was caught IN FUKUSHIMA BAY!. Open ocean fish a few Km away were low/safe.

To Pheonix358--the NETC is a bit ridiculous. It has results of high-volume air filters from EPA, ambient air measured by personal monitors, and lord-knows what else. It uses nSv, microSv, and CPM as if they're interchangeable. It's out to get your money and is full of BS. But you're probably paid up.


The bad thing is that highly radioactive fish from fuku bay, don't know that they must stay there, so they go elsewhere and travel in the ocean and mess up the food chain...



posted on Dec, 20 2013 @ 08:11 AM
link   
reply to post by Dr1Akula
 

Not really. The shallow water bottom dwellers like the rockfish don't get out into the deep open ocean. Certainly some radioactivity will be spread around the world, but after 2 &1/2 years, there's still barely any past 20 km from the Fuku plant itself.

edit on 10/06/2013 by Tusks because: (no reason given)

edit on 10/06/2013 by Tusks because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2013 @ 09:01 AM
link   

Unity_99
Didn't Japan pass what amounts to severe censorship laws just recently including harsh penalties against whistle blowers? And then this report is being circulated!


This is why I do not trust this report. It is coming straight from the Japanese government and the IAEA, both have vested interests to not alarm the public.

I wish I could have Tusk's optimism and believe Fukushima is not that bad and the US and the Pacific aren't affected. I just can't. 3 total meltdowns, radioactive water is leaking into the ground water and ocean. Cesium 137 is being detected in all the blue fin tuna caught in the North Pacific.

We need more independent testing. It is foolish to trust any study coming from Japan.
edit on 20-12-2013 by jrod because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2013 @ 09:05 AM
link   
reply to post by jrod
 


They're not all coming from Japan. The study that shows that Bluefin Tuna has low levels is from both Stanford University, and Stony Brook. Should we not trust them too?



posted on Dec, 20 2013 @ 09:10 AM
link   
reply to post by Zaphod58
 


While the levels maybe low and 'safe' I think it is significant to note that fish caught 1000s of miles away from Fuku have measurable levels.

Hopefully things are getting better.



posted on Dec, 20 2013 @ 09:13 AM
link   
reply to post by jrod
 


Of course they do. No one is saying that there aren't going to be measurable levels, and probably for several more years. But contrary to the "We're all dead" reports, this shows that the levels that are being spread aren't as high as some are claiming. All the ELE reports that have been spread are being shown to be wrong. Yes, there is some risk to eating seafood, but this shows that the risk isn't as high as claimed, and there has been risk of eating seafood for years, even prior to Fukushima.



new topics

top topics



 
3
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join