The most amazing beauty of ice crystals

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posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 09:27 AM
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The most beautiful snowflake photos you’ll ever see, captured with a cheap DIY camera.
When I discovered the photos I almost couldn't believe these were real. I thought someone had use a 3D printer and printed those small crystal like figures.









All of the snowflake photos on this page, believe it or not, were captured using a six-year-old point-and-shoot Canon camera and a standard 58mm SLR lens that was produced in the USSR sometime between 1958 and 1992. Such photography ought to be impossible without a microscope or other expensive gear, but it just perfectly illustrates the photographic and aesthetic ingenuity of Alexey Kljatov, a Russian photographer who lives in Moscow.




And he made quiet allot of those amazing pictures..



There seems to be a well known hacking technique for this to do it yourself well if you're familiar with photography I think.





To take these photos with a normal camera and lens, Kljatov exploits a fairly well known photographical hack: reversing a standard prime lens to turn it into a very strong macro lens. Without getting into the physics of how camera lenses work, here’s a basic explanation of how it works: A standard 50mm lens has to reduce everything it sees down to the size of the film negative or digital CMOS sensor. If you reverse the lens, it does the opposite, projecting an almost-life-size image upon the negative/sensor. This is obviously no good for photographing large objects, but it’s perfect for the details in small objects, such as flowers, bugs, or snowflakes.





I think I'm going to tryout this technique ill hope I'm not going to destroy my camera lens in the process..


Peace


edit on 0b49America/ChicagoTue, 17 Dec 2013 10:22:49 -0600vAmerica/ChicagoTue, 17 Dec 2013 10:22:49 -06001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 09:34 AM
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They are so perfect that I can not believe they are real.



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 09:39 AM
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reply to post by Bandolero
 


yeah they are amazing, some look like computer chips. I'm still questioning there realness , but I only know if I'm going to try it myself.



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 09:44 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 

Mathematics in nature never ceases to amaze me.

Thanks for the pics. If there was still a "thumbs up" emote, I'd use it.



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by Chamberf=6
 


They are Amazing and looking at the kaleidoscopic structure it got me thinking that they strangely look somehow like crop circles



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 10:25 AM
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All of the snowflake photos on this page, believe it or not, were captured using a six-year-old point-and-shoot Canon camera and a standard 58mm SLR lens that was produced in the USSR sometime between 1958 and 1992.


SLR stands for Single Lens Reflector which is describing way the a camera body uses a mirror that flicks up when a picture is taken inside its main body and is nothing to do with the actual lens.


Such photography ought to be impossible without a microscope or other expensive gear, but it just perfectly illustrates the photographic and aesthetic ingenuity of Alexey Kljatov, a Russian photographer who lives in Moscow.


People have been reversing standard lenses to make macro lens's for as long as they have been making specialized macro lenses. There are 1000's of tutorials on haw its done on the internet. So there's no special 'aesthetic ingenuity' credited to one guy when 10's or 1000's of people are also doing it. I used to do it myself before i bought a dedicated macro lens.

But saying that freezing the water drops on material to create single crystals does work very well and they are nice pictures.


edit on 17-12-2013 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


Very beautiful~! Thanks for sharing! Its amazing how each flake is its own flake. It really does show just how wonderful this universe is, from the very big to the very small!
Could our whole universe be a snow flake falling to the ground in some greater universe? These are the things I think when I look at these snow flakes! Neat!



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 10:46 AM
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If each flake is unique it proves that unique events happen in the universe.

Lets hope that whatever caused abiogenesis wasn't a unique event.



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


I bought a lens reversing ring for my Canon A1 years ago, and have had so much fun with it!
They're not very spendy, and you get a lot of fun for your $.



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 11:01 AM
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reply to post by PhoenixOD
 


Well I'm a unique event there's nobody like me...



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 

Wow! Thanks for sharing those. Like others have said yes each one is unique and just absolutely beautiful to look upon. I was mesmerized by these photos. I actually thought I should paint one but then thought hah..I'm so out of practice it would be horrid! I wouldn't be able to match the beauty that is seen in those pictures.

It's really amazing how snowflakes look up close. It reminds me of when you fold a paper and snip here and there and ya have a paper snowflake
fun times.

Some of the pictures look like mini clear flowers.. I can't get over the beauty of these. SnF and thanks again for sharing the beauty of snow. Even though I don't like coldness or snow..I can still appreciate the loveliness of the snow flake


Peace and love~~>>
-nat
edit on 17-12-2013 by natalia because: Spelling ..




posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 03:11 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


BEAUTIFUL!!! Good vibes up in here! Remember this?


edit on pm1231pmTue, 17 Dec 2013 15:14:51 -0600 by antar because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


I have to add that the other night I was touched profoundly at the concept of the complete beingness of each snow flake that fell. That the entire life cycle of the individual flake was no greater than any other form of life.



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by antar
 


wow poetically said ...




antar
reply to post by 0bserver1
 


BEAUTIFUL!!! Good vibes up in here! Remember this?


edit on pm1231pmTue, 17 Dec 2013 15:14:51 -0600 by antar because: (no reason given)


I remember again .. but that's a long time ago I've seen them.
edit on 0b43America/ChicagoTue, 17 Dec 2013 17:09:43 -0600vAmerica/ChicagoTue, 17 Dec 2013 17:09:43 -06001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by natalia
 





Wow! Thanks for sharing those. Like others have said yes each one is unique and just absolutely beautiful to look upon. I was mesmerized by these photos. I actually thought I should paint one but then thought hah..I'm so out of practice it would be horrid! I wouldn't be able to match the beauty that is seen in those pictures.


No don't let the perfectness and beauty of those crystals blind you. If the crystals inspire you , then you'll find a way to express your feeling within the painting for them..
edit on 0b07America/ChicagoTue, 17 Dec 2013 17:16:07 -0600vAmerica/ChicagoTue, 17 Dec 2013 17:16:07 -06001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


This was something my kids wanted to do for a science fair project a few years back but we could not find a place to flash freeze the results. It still interests me how snow flakes can reflect the energy sent to them. I guess in their purist form they are just that, pure and graceful. I think of earth millions of years ago, how pure it must have been a utopia/ heaven in the truest sense of the word. You have heard like myself how words take wings and even thoughts can change our reality. So many negative thoughts flying around for thousands of years by humans alone, how this has affected our planet, solar system and galaxy. It would be a great visual meditation to become a snowflake from the drop of moisture rising until it finally floats down and then joins seamlessly with the rest of the snow. Like the drop of water returning to the ocean.



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by antar
 

Like tears in the rain.. we once knew Antar some of us have been here many times before. And always choose to come back to make the difference in this world so it wouldn't perish or be ruled for ever by dark forces..



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


OMG "Like tears in the rain" that is an amazing concept. Kind of blows me away. A gentle reminder...





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