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Color of the Moon (Once Again)

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posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 01:22 AM
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And here is today's Astronomy Picture of the Day
apod.nasa.gov...




posted on Dec, 19 2013 @ 04:01 AM
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reply to post by EllasArchaiaDynamis
 

Awesome, thanks for sharing!
The colours seen in any particular image like this one also depend on the photographic equipment and processing used, and the lunar highlands (iron-poor) generally come out in hues of pink and yellow.

Here's an article posted by Manchester Astronomical Society, including a colour map of the Moon published all the way back in 1967: www.mikeoates.org...


The most colourful region is Wood's spot, an area adjacent to the crater Aristarchus. Visually it is vaguely yellowish. In 1922, Wood recorded it as having a spectral reflectivity similar to the sulphurous deposits around volcanic regions on Earth. Colour enhanced digital images show it as a dirty yellow, by far the strongest colour shade on the earthward face of the moon.

Between Aristarchus and Herodotus, the Portuguese observer, Filipe Alves, distinctly shows a bluish area. He published an article on lunar colour and digital remote sensing in Sky&Telescope, July 2005.

So colour of the Moon is nothing new either; anyone seriosuly interested in moon observation would have learned about this. None of that "NASA telling people the Moon is grey"



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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wildespace
So colour of the Moon is nothing new either; anyone seriosuly interested in moon observation would have learned about this. None of that "NASA telling people the Moon is grey"

NASA is not telling people, it's showing people that the Moon is grey. Perhaps the Earth's atmosphere changes its color or maybe human eye or film/ccd are not very sensitive to colors when looking at very intense reflected light. To me the pictures from JR are very realistic looking in terms of portraying an extraterrestrial landscape. Looking forward for more photos from the Chinese probe.



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 01:12 PM
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mrkeen

wildespace
So colour of the Moon is nothing new either; anyone seriosuly interested in moon observation would have learned about this. None of that "NASA telling people the Moon is grey"

NASA is not telling people, it's showing people that the Moon is grey.

Does it really? solarsystem.nasa.gov...
They even added colour to the B&W LRO images to make the animation below:
www.youtube.com...


Granted, they do show a lot of B&W photos of the Moon, but so do many other agencies/media publications/photographers/everyone else. It's one of the unfortunate facts that for some reason photographers decide to make their Moon shots B&W. (although one reason for B&W images is that a telescope with a CCD without RGB filters was used)

Anyway, why do we need to rely on anything NASA says? You can go out and look for yourself, take photos, use image processing to bring out the colours, etc.


Perhaps the Earth's atmosphere changes its color or maybe human eye or film/ccd are not very sensitive to colors when looking at very intense reflected light.

It's mostly due to the colours being very subtle. Can't blame the atmosphere as we have many colourful images of space. Lunar light isn't any more intense than asphalt under sunlight on a clear day.
edit on 21-12-2013 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 02:24 PM
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Colors on the moon? It depends on who you ask!

Here's the Apollo 15 Jim Irwin anecdote on the colors he saw on the "moon"



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 06:16 PM
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Here are some coloured rocks spotted by Apollo 15 guys:

Bluish rock www.hq.nasa.gov...


Greenish rock www.hq.nasa.gov...


Sample of the above rock www.lpi.usra.edu...


David Scott: (in july 1971 commander of Apollo 15)
"Can you imagine finding a green rock on the Moon? Think about that. We'd never had any green rocks in training. Nobody'd ever said anything about green rocks - orange, or anything - and all of a sudden you're sitting there and, you find a green rock! I missed it; Jim (LMP James Irwin) saw it. I didn't see it; and then I saw it; and it was really green.


Multi-coloured rock from Apollo 17 www.hq.nasa.gov...


Source: the-moon.wikispaces.com...



posted on Dec, 21 2013 @ 07:53 PM
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The Moon's surface is composed almost entirely of two environments which can each be found here on Earth. This isn't surprising from the current theory about moon formation which is that Proto-Earth was impacted obliquely by a Mars sized celestial body known as "Theia". After the impact materials from both Proto-Earth and Theia were mixed together. The portions which were not at orbital velocity were drawn back to Earth and form the planet we know today. The materials which were at orbital velocities eventually accreted into the moon as we know it today. But enough of a cosmology lesson and back to the colour. One of the previously mentioned environments is a rock called anorthosite, which is comprised primarily of plagioclase feldspar with only minor mafic constituents and is therefore white in colour. The darker spots you see are Maria basalt, and KREEP basalt (which stands for K-potassium, REE-Rare earth elements, and P-phosphorus) as well as regolith (blasted chunks of rock) accumulated from the constant bombardment of the lunar surface. These rocks can be extremely dark grey, but are typically black. So when you see "The man in the moon" the white parts are anorthosite, and his dark eyes, mouth, and such are basalt.





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