Color of the Moon (Once Again)

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posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 02:51 PM
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Hello everybody! Some time ago I started a discussion in a thread related to Apollo missions about what color the Moon surface is. Several photos appeared in that thread, which showed that the Moon is possibly not gray, but tan-colored. Many of the photos were later found to be not true full-color, but reconstructed from monochromatic shots at wavelengths not linked to human vision. So, basically, the notion that the Moon is not silver-gray, but has a brownish tint, was put aside. Now we have this new photo from the Chinese Jade Rabbit probe:


Looks like the Moon surface is actually light-brown with stones scattered around having obviously different, lighter color. Maybe this is the first time we can really have an independent close look at the moon surface in color. Interesting how other JR photos will correlate with what we believed about the Moon landscape till now.

Just for comparison, this is the previously posted Kaguya picture of the Moon. Color is obviously noticeable:


And this is Clementine color photo of the Archimedes crater. Even if we take into account different saturation level, the hues are very informative:


For comparison, this is a random Apollo photo:

edit on 16-12-2013 by mrkeen because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 02:58 PM
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IT'S A CONSPIRACY!!! I mean the moon doesn't shine white because it's reflecting the sun....



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 03:02 PM
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Cool pictures.
Looking forward to seeing more.



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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So all images suggest that it's a dirty sandy grey.

Was it supposed to be pink?



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by mrkeen
 


The white stones are evidently a very different color than their surroundings. They do not blend in, or even approximate the color, they are white and the ground isn't. An ATS geologist should be around shortly to set you straight though - for everything on the moon is supposed to be a whiter shade of pale (then again, the stones are reflecting more light and look whiter than the little-less reflective dust/ground).

edit on 16-12-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)
edit on 16-12-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 03:25 PM
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Give it a few months an people will have a larger collection of new photos to compare with Apollos. For me personally I don't care what the moon colour is, I want to know the colours and material of the megaliths up there



NOTE: color/colour, which ones correct? lol



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 03:39 PM
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skyblueworld
Give it a few months an people will have a larger collection of new photos to compare with Apollos. For me personally I don't care what the moon colour is, I want to know the colours and material of the megaliths up there



NOTE: color/colour, which ones correct? lol


Well if you want real English it's colour .. Only Americans can be lazy and lose the U. Just kidding!! I mean that jokingly

I've always assumed the moon was always a dirty grey colour I can't explain why the rocks look different but as long as it keeps shining bright that's all that matters



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 03:42 PM
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From around the net, a mosaic of random bits of moon images.



I think they tell a story about the imaging and photo reproduction equipment, than the actual color of the moon.



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by mrkeen
 


I am excited! I hope there will be a ton to see without blurry pictures.

This shows the landing it made me dizzy really cool!


www.telegraph.co.uk...



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 04:23 PM
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skyblueworld
Give it a few months an people will have a larger collection of new photos to compare with Apollos. For me personally I don't care what the moon colour is, I want to know the colours and material of the megaliths up there


The subtle colors of the Moon are varied in the Apollo pictures, so I suppose we will see a variety of hues from this Chinese mission, too.



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 04:36 PM
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Looks pretty brown in this video taken what 40 some years ago now?


Oh yeah and the famous ORANGE



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by abeverage
 


They forgot to switch the Mars filters...



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 05:35 PM
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Let me look up in the sky with my own two eyeballs. Hmm... Looks mostly whitish/gray from where I'm standing. Does it really matter what color it would be if I was 50 miles above it, or standing on its surface? Because that's never going to happen!



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 09:10 PM
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Blue Shift
Let me look up in the sky with my own two eyeballs. Hmm... Looks mostly whitish/gray from where I'm standing. Does it really matter what color it would be if I was 50 miles above it, or standing on its surface? Because that's never going to happen!


It matters it could cost you when go to play who wants to be a million air.

But seriously what color is it?



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 09:29 PM
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reply to post by abeverage
 


So where did they land, do you think they will tell the world when they discover we were never there lol...

Look forward to more pics. They can put rover on moon but can't breathe the air in bejing lol go figure....

The Bot



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 10:36 PM
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reply to post by dlbott
 



They did not land near any of the Apollo sites. The closest man-made object to where they landed (although still quite a distance away) is the Russian Luna17/Lunakhod 1 rover. The nearest Apollo site (Apollo 15) is a few hundred km away:


Image Source


edit on 12/16/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2013 @ 10:37 PM
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What makes you think the Lunar surface would be the same color everywhere? Do you think that maybe lighting conditions might affect it in any way?

And what difference does it make anyway?

Here's some interesting terrain.
www.fantom-xp.com...



posted on Dec, 17 2013 @ 12:08 AM
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Colour (or colours) of the Moon is one of my favourite topics, so I'll post information I gathered here gladly. (I'm gonna have to shoot off to work in a bit, so just a short post now)

Overall, the Moon is grey, with subtle hues depending on local mineral composition. It isn't predominantly brown or tan like seen in some images and claimed in some conspiracy videos. A lot of times, colouration is due to the imaging/photographic processing and reproduction.

The two predominant colours of the Moon are blueish (in iron-rich, titanium-rich areas) and reddish (in iron-rich, titanium-poor areas). The best place where it is seen is the border between mare Tranquilitatis and Serenitatis: www.space.com...

The bluish colour of mare Tranquilitatis is even visible through good binoculars. With a telescope, you can see reddish/bluish colouration in other places too, such as the Aristarchus crater and surrounding area. Here's a great colour image of the Moon:


Here's a photo of the moon with colours enhanced:

Source: www.datarescue.com...

A great article on colours of the Moon, including many Apollo images. the-moon.wikispaces.com...
edit on 17-12-2013 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2013 @ 03:37 AM
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Here's a colour photo of the The Aristarchus Plateau, by Russell Croman


Normally, we think of the moon as fairly colorless, especially in comparison to the Earth. But the moon is not entirely without color, as this image of the Aristarchus Plateau region shows. The plateau itself is the roughly rectangular brownish region at the center of the picture. It is punctuated by the bright young crater Aristarchus, and the older, lava-filled crater Herodotus. The feature starting to the right of Herodotus and meandering across the plateau is Schroter's Valley, possibly a collapsed lava tube or ancient lava flow. The plateau apparently gets its color from an iron-rich material spewed out onto it by volcanic activity.

I've read that you can see this brown colouration through a telescope with your own eyes. The basaltic plains around the plateau are bluish, thanks to titanium-rich minerals.

Here it is in a wider context (www.astronomie.be...)



posted on Dec, 18 2013 @ 05:29 AM
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Distance dilutes colour hence why horizons seem a greyish washed out colour.
Or
Frequencies create colour so would it be right to assume each planets colour ( shining colour ) indicates the planetary frequency?
Unfortunately we are changing ours





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