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Foie Gras: Delicacy of Despair. Oh the humanity

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posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 11:02 AM
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To produce “foie gras” (which literally means “fatty liver”), workers ram pipes down male ducks’ or geese’s throats two or three times daily and pump as much as 4 pounds of grain and fat into the animals’ stomachs, causing their livers to bloat to up to 10 times their normal size. Many birds have difficulty standing because of their engorged livers, and they may tear out their own feathers and cannibalize each other out of stress.

Read more: www.peta.org...


My son posted this on FB this morning but I thought he was just being "internet naive" until I checked it out myself. It really is a shame. Thankfully, reading on it says this procedure has been banned in U.K., Austria, Germany, the Czech Republic, Finland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark, and Israel.

Link

Graphic images to make you MAD

Make you want to do something huh?
edit on 14-12-2013 by FlySolo because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 11:28 AM
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reply to post by FlySolo
 


Problem with people and money, if there is a market for it, people make it happen.

If people keep buying and eating the nasty stuff, then there will be other people who want to make a business off of it. You should see how they make frozen fish and other regular foods. It isn't pretty. Nor does it seem like humane or fair animal treatment. But people keep forking over their cash for it, creating a market and the demand still remains.

That same principle applies to Walmart, chinese junk, junk food, pron, etc...if the people keep buying it, the demand creates the market.

You get the idea.
Those poor animals don't stand a chance.





posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 11:53 AM
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reply to post by havok
 


You make a good point - if you build it, they will come..

I have to ask though, what's so bad about frozen fish?



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 12:37 PM
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reply to post by stumason
 


To answer your question, it regards their environment and the country of origin. If your product comes from China, like the majority of ours, the cesspool of a pond in which these fish live in is beyond deplorable. They swim in their own filth and excrement, without any type of filtering or clean water supply. The fish themselves are fed basically an industrial byproduct of a pellet and live in ponds that contain millions of fish. No breathing room, muddy muck of a water system, and constant leeching from septic beds that contaminate the water with arsenic, and levels of lead or other poisons. Not exact "farm fresh".

But sure...THE FROZEN FISH IS GOOD FOR YOU...say it with me...in unison.





posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 12:53 PM
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The 'I'll eat anything I damn well please and you suck for suggesting otherwise' people will come out soon, like they did in my recent thread about torturing animals before they're slaughtered.

The weird thing is, eating food that's treated like this is pretty much eating food that will kill you right back. Fatty liver food results in the human having a fatty liver too, which leads to organ damage.

Then there's the prions that are in much of our food supply now. The incubation time might be long, but the poisons are inescapable. Maybe prions are really karma. Talk about blow-back.



posted on Dec, 14 2013 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by FlySolo
 

That is disgusting.
Disgusting that we (as a modern, progressive, civilized society) not only condone, but promote such enterprise/s and those that capitalize on them.
Sadly, this is barely a tip on the iceberg... Everything about mass chicken & pork farming... Cattle feed yards... Do you know how there is enough young, fresh, supple calf...to supply the ever-growing market for "veal"?

Maybe animals are just tools. Do whatever you want to them, as long as they serve your purpose.



posted on Dec, 15 2013 @ 05:59 AM
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I didn't know about frozen fish. I don't eat seafood of any kind anyway. After everything I've read about Japan (and even California) the last six months I'd stop, if I had been.

I knew about veal. Hideous.

I knew about duck liver. Also hideous.

One thing that really irritates me is how difficult it is to just find something that is decent.

I will pay more for a cow that had a decent grass-fed life, a chicken with a decent bug-scavenging life, with space and fresh air and a Temple Grandin-style ethical end. I will pay more for a vegetable that was not part of an agrichem process annihilating whole ecosystems. But there's not a lot of options in the few stores near me (mostly super walmart. When they moved in, all our other grocery stores died, except a super tiny one that is now larger).

They did start carrying 'organic chicken.' That was like choirs-of-angels-sing surprising. And just two weeks ago they started carrying kerrygold butter, OMG, I've had to pay $100 in bulk online to get that stuff for $5.50US per 8oz but now my local SWM sells it for $3/8oz (at least their intro price), that's awesome. So perhaps they are coming around... very slowly... to having at least something that isn't total crap for sale.

I'm still stuck there with fatfree allegedly-greek yogurt (WTH is that? yes definitely, let's remove natural animal fat and add carageenan and gums instead) and all dairy thicker than milk with carageenan (the primary ingredient used to give lab animals tumors. I can't find a single source of half&half, cream, or creamcheese, without it locally). And of course aside from the organic chicken, every meat even whole turkeys and chickens are "up to 15% solution" (that's a LOT!) by weight.

I actually once calculated, if you accounted for the artificially increased sodium-and-whatever-injection into the chicken, the organic was literally like 3 cents more per pound. I mean this idea that somehow meat is cheaper if we torture animals horribly in vile conditions, and nearly unaffordable if we raise them decently and kill them in the most humane fashion, is actually bogus. It isn't that there is no profit in doing it well. It is just not as MUCH profit. Of course, if we made a major effort to buy the grass-fed stuff and so on, we would support the better industry and that could change.

But I can't support it toward change if it's not for sale. And the big corps like walmart choose what is for sale. Right now, if WM made a major effort to provide a line of grass-fed organic beef for example, people would buy it and the people selling it would make a profit and that part of the industry would grow while the factory-notfarm part would shrink a little. But that would depend on someone with the power to make such decisions caring.

The produce in the story is rotting now; the topsoil is horrible. Good quality produce does not rot, it just dehydrates. And it doesn't start dehydrating until it is surprisingly old. I think I'm going to expand my backyard garden next year.

I once drove around 3 cities trying to find a butcher shop or slaughterhouse that had grass-fed -- even some grain in the winter, fine, but I wanted cows that got to live in the fields (I *see* them when driving), rather than the factory sorts, and couldn't find them. So far what I've found is farmers who raise cattle like this but it is all sold to people they know, it doesn't even go through commercial routes. So you have to have the cash up front to buy a side of beef plus have a good sized chest freezer to store it, as opposed to being able to pick up a steak for dinner at a store, of course.

And the second thing besides availability (the price for online grass-fed beef is actually insane. The people I know who from local farmers get a much more reasonable price) is what's REAL.

By that I mean, the same vile-ethics that run all these industries also run the agencies (captured eons ago by corporate interests) defining terms, and labeling laws, and so on.

So "free range" can mean "their profoundly overcrowded pen was outside of shelter, or had a skylight to see the sky" as opposed to "actually had space to move." And feeding creatures gmo soybeans does not improve anything when that creature is designed to eat a variety of good grains and bugs. And 'organic' can be hacked in a variety of interesting ways, just like most labeling laws can, by those with an intent.

So to a great degree, even if you CAN find decent stuff, even if you CAN pay for it, you can't trust packaging to actually tell you what is real. It's like you have to go visit whatever place actually sources the food to try and get an idea of the conditions, process, food supply, and more that was actually the case for whatever you are buying.

A lot of people think that if we are stuck eating mostly only this or that, it's because we vote with our wallet on that so it's our own fault.

But I think if VALID INFORMATION were actually available about things -- no hiding gmos and nasty chems in screwed up labeling laws, no caveats that make every attempt for words that mean something good be usurped by those doing bad, so it all is blended for the consumer -- and if the stuff were actually available to buy to begin with --

-- I think enough people would make good decisions to at least start shifting these lousy agrichem and meatchem industries into a better market with more concern for the input, the process, and the results.

But you can't buy it if it isn't available. And you can't buy "what was raised humanely and fed well" if you can't tell what's what from the packaging.
edit on 15-12-2013 by RedCairo because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2013 @ 06:36 AM
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reply to post by FlySolo
 


Congrats to your son and you for sharing information like this with people. When I was a kid my friends and I knew nothing about our own and our families food choices, and never discussed "Should we?" as much as "Shall we get a cheap bag of greasy French fries and hot dogs now or after the game?".

There are at least three ways to look at foie gras. If you are a meateater (corpsearian) you may either love or dislike the dish, or even hate the concept and keep away from this particular food. But many don't focus on the torture of their other food. When I ate the animals (and none could escape me, for I am man) I loved pressed duck. It would be my "reward meal" when I got a paycheck or other income. Pressed duck joined the other members of the animal kingdom in my stomach. I'd heard about the fatty liver food, but had no interest in eating liver. If I did I probably would have loved it.

Or if you are a seeds and plants eater (vegetarian) the practice of torturing the ducks may look like insanity, as might any killing of an animal to actually put a piece of him or her into your mouth (WT?). It's that difference in consciousness that is one of the seldom discussed-at-length reasons to become a vegetarian. For me, my "reward meal" is now an Indian buffet of extraordinary taste and textures.
edit on 15-12-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)
edit on 15-12-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2013 @ 09:22 AM
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reply to post by FlySolo
 


A root cause analysis is in order. All humans must participate. Some humans will respond to the findings with "Yeah, known that for years.". Others might just surprise us with "Ya mean milk doesn'tcome from plastic bottles?!".

Some things will have to change before civilization is actually civil.



posted on Dec, 15 2013 @ 10:00 AM
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I don't understand people who claim righteous indignation against the suffering of animals, yet don't blink an eye against the slaughtering of animals. Are you actually trying to argue that torture is a worse crime than murder? I know you mean well, but the hypocritical mentality underlying this approach is utterly twisted, and lacking any foundational principles.
edit on 12 15 2013 by Son of Will because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2013 @ 11:51 AM
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Son of Will
I don't understand people who claim righteous indignation against the suffering of animals, yet don't blink an eye against the slaughtering of animals. Are you actually trying to argue that torture is a worse crime than murder? I know you mean well, but the hypocritical mentality underlying this approach is utterly twisted, and lacking any foundational principles.

People can't - at least easily - avoid eating meat. This is why we choose a less evil means. If we had a choice, we'd probably choose to not eat it.

Ofc some people eat it because it tastes good, not because they need it. They've probably never even looked at the ingredients on the product. Can they be blamed? Can a person be blamed for not sending money to starving children in Africa? 17 of the 20 poorest countries are african. I didn't even know that until now. Can I be blamed for ignorance? Ignorance is widespread, but is it evil? I don't think there's a single person on this planet that can't be blamed for somehow being bad.
edit on 15-12-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2013 @ 12:41 PM
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reply to post by havok
 


To be honest, Foie Gras isn't nasty. It is absolutely delicious.

But it is wrong. I don't eat it. We don't serve it in any restaurant i am associated with. It is cruel. But if it weren't....man, id eat that stuff every day.



posted on Dec, 15 2013 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


I'm sure it is, BFFT...but I wouldn't eat it.

I want nothing to do with the fat laden liver of a force fed goose, duck or any other animal for that matter. I believe it's just a principal thing for me. I don't believe it is natural or supposed to be consumed as a delicacy. Just my humble opinion. I try to stay away from super fat foods anyways and that's just my eating habits, I care less what other people eat. I am by no means a vegetarian but I believe in the humane treatment and dispatching of animals for sustenance.

Same with the frozen fish though. I live for fish and try to get as much fresh as possible. But where I live that isn't exactly the case, so I must buy frozen occasionally. When I found out what happens to it before it hits the freezer, I decided to stick to fresh much more than I previously did.

It's all in personal taste I guess.





posted on Dec, 15 2013 @ 01:20 PM
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havok
reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


I'm sure it is, BFFT...but I wouldn't eat it.

I want nothing to do with the fat laden liver of a force fed goose, duck or any other animal for that matter. I believe it's just a principal thing for me. I don't believe it is natural or supposed to be consumed as a delicacy. Just my humble opinion. I try to stay away from super fat foods anyways and that's just my eating habits, I care less what other people eat. I am by no means a vegetarian but I believe in the humane treatment and dispatching of animals for sustenance.

Same with the frozen fish though. I live for fish and try to get as much fresh as possible. But where I live that isn't exactly the case, so I must buy frozen occasionally. When I found out what happens to it before it hits the freezer, I decided to stick to fresh much more than I previously did.

It's all in personal taste I guess.




well, like i said..i won't eat it either. But I have tried it, before I really knew what it was. Being involved with some fine dining establishments, i have a position of being able to prevent it being served as well.


That aside, it is delicious. It is the only food I don't eat due to moral objection.





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