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Map ranks nation's 'super zip codes'

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posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 12:30 PM
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This is actually pretty cool interactive map. Please click on the link below, enter in your zip code of your hometown or the area you live at now to see the median household income and percentage of college graduates. I'm from the zip code 60540, which ranked 96 on the scale $105,650 median house income and 67% graduated college.

"A Zip’s ranking is a number between 0 and 99 representing the average of its percentile ranks in college education and in income. The 650 Zips with rankings of 95 and higher are called Super Zips."

Interactive Map. Please click

Where does your town fall?




posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by jhn7537
 


why does college education matter again? As a stat the denote prominence?

Mind conditioning....thats what that is.



posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 01:27 PM
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bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by jhn7537
 


why does college education matter again? As a stat the denote prominence?

Mind conditioning....thats what that is.


I think it shows that the higher income areas, ie my zip code that I listed have a much higher median household income than a place ie. south side of chicago where very few go to college which shows lower income levels.

I do believe education and higher income go hand in hand, and I do believe that is reflected by this interactive map.

Areas with higher degrees = higher median income
edit on 12-12-2013 by jhn7537 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by jhn7537
 


Midland TX is the city with the second highest income in the nation. I notice, looking over my area on that map, that it is ranked quite low on the overall scale.



posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 01:39 PM
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bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by jhn7537
 


Midland TX is the city with the second highest income in the nation. I notice, looking over my area on that map, that it is ranked quite low on the overall scale.


I'm not too familiar with Midland, TX, but I'm guessing it's a city that's struck a lot oil? Probably less education in the area (college grads), but probably wealth due to oil money... Am I close?



posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 01:43 PM
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jhn7537

bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by jhn7537
 


Midland TX is the city with the second highest income in the nation. I notice, looking over my area on that map, that it is ranked quite low on the overall scale.


I'm not too familiar with Midland, TX, but I'm guessing it's a city that's struck a lot oil? Probably less education in the area (college grads), but probably wealth due to oil money... Am I close?


Basically. Lots of oil money, wind money. A kid in the oilfield can make $30/hr easy. I know a driller making half a million a year. He just runs the rig. Went to school with him. He was a great football player that was ineligible his senior year because he had failed too many times and was too old to play.

My point is, the article seems to program the reader to see "affluence" as being white collar and wealthy. It undervalues wealth created from hard work, and over values wealth in general as a sign of personal value.



posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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i should add: i am not taking away the interest of the link. just discussing its contents.



posted on Dec, 12 2013 @ 01:53 PM
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bigfatfurrytexan
i should add: i am not taking away the interest of the link. just discussing its contents.


I didn't think that was your intention, so no issues here. I do agree with you with the way the link presents the information, but I also feel that a city like Midland who has struck oil, wind energy, fracking, etc. is more an exception than anything... I don't believe you can go to too many areas around the country to find situations similar to yours. I believe most areas with low graduation rates will likely display low incomes too. Good discussion nevertheless..



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