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Rare Blood Infection Surfaces in Injured U.S. Soldiers

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posted on Nov, 18 2004 @ 03:47 PM
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Soldiers injured in Middle east and Afghanistan conflicts
turning up in high numbers with Rare Hard to Treat Blood
infection. Although it is unknown where the soldiers contracted The Infection, The Infection (Acinetobacter baumannii) turned up
in soldiers in the Walter Reed Army Medical center
Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany and three other sites between Jan. 1, 2002, and Aug. 31, 2004,
 



story.news.yahoo.com
Reuters
Rare Blood Infection Surfaces in Injured U.S. Soldiers

49 minutes ago

By Paul Simao

ATLANTA (Reuters) - An unexpectedly high number of U.S. soldiers injured in the Middle East and Afghanistan (news - web sites) are testing positive for a rare, hard-to-treat blood infection in military hospitals, Army doctors reported on Thursday.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


102 cases of the blood infection have been found at this time
85 of the bloodstream cases were found in soldiers serving
in Iraq , Kuwait and around Afghanistan.
Army Medical sources say that there is no indication that
biochemical agents played a part in the infection.

[edit on 11/18/2004 by geocom]

[edit on 11/18/2004 by geocom]




posted on Nov, 18 2004 @ 04:07 PM
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i wonder if this has anything to do with the radiation in Iraq. I read somewhere that Iraq is one of the most radioactive places on earth, dunno about Afghanistan though...

[edit on 18-11-2004 by Elijio]



posted on Nov, 18 2004 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by Elijio
i wonder if this has anything to do with the radiation in Iraq. I read somewhere that Iraq is one of the most radioactive places on earth, dunno about Afghanistan though...

[edit on 18-11-2004 by Elijio]



This little bug may be one of the very many that have mutated to break the laws of biology as we know it. ...Even E. coli is now transmitted in the air.

Most modern diseases - "new" diseases and new forms of old diseases - result from mutations triggered by "multifactorial" exposures, meaning several factors actively contribute to the mutation. Radiation is certainly one of the factors, along with heavy metals, chemicals and more.

The artickle suggests that "unsanitary conditions" may be the cause of this mini-epidemic - which simply scapegoats our military medical services - and does not acknowledge the real (and scary) changes occurring in our planet's microbial world.



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