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A Positive Look at Cops.

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posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


I thought you meant lead as in bullet lead and being armed! LOL I am an idiot.

I will read up. Thank you.




posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 


Well

Even with my Masters Degree, I would suppose he is quite a bit more informed than myself or anyone on here

I'll go with the expert every time



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 11:36 AM
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gladtobehere

More Tickets in Hard Times .



We have the same thing in my country but not for revenue but because the Police should show that they are doing something. Sometimes there are cops in my country that do alcohol tests on themselves so they can do something use full and not waste time on hunting statistics to show for crazy politicians. There have been some coverage in the news about this and the Police are frankly pissed off at the waste of time.

I heard that in the US there are cases where cops sometimes seize the money that is in the car for their district and force the people to give up their money or they will file charges. This is highway robbery and the politicians, lawyers and policemen who do this should be imprisoned for being highwaymen. A thief is a thief and these people are thieves even if they hide behind the laws they have created.


edit on 5-12-2013 by LittleByLittle because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by LittleByLittle
 


Boy, it sounds like it is almost the same here as it is there. I suppose, most of us have ties to the Europeans.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by LittleByLittle
 


Seizures are justified with "The War On Drugs". I mean, i should have no reason to carry $5k in my car with me while driving cross country, right? So it must be drug money.

This happens a lot on Interstate 10, as you get into southern Texas through Louisianna and into Florida.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 11:56 AM
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I'm not sure this applies to this thread or not, but I'm going to post it:

I bumped into an old classmate of mine. We were in first grade together. I remembered him. He is now a county cop. He approached me and we reminisced about the good ol' days, and then he gave me a confession.
He said: "one day in class, when you weren't looking, I took the 50 cents you had for lunch on your desk."

I said jokingly: "I remember that day as I went hungry."

He said: "I owe you one--a free pass".

To which I replied: "You already paid your debt in full by telling me, and I thank you for that."


He had that on his conscience all these years and felt the need to come clean to me. Not many cops out there like that with that quality of character and honesty.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 11:58 AM
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semperfortis
reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 


Well

Even with my Masters Degree, I would suppose he is quite a bit more informed than myself or anyone on here

I'll go with the expert every time


Cool. Just so we're clear then these people are not "experts":

Robert J Sampson
Stephen Raudenbush
David Thatcher
Bernard Harcourt
Dorothy Roberts
Steven Levitt
Stephen Dubner

Looks more like you just found something that supports your personal perspective and have decided to latch onto it as gospel.
edit on 5-12-2013 by thisguyrighthere because: add more names



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by Liquesence
 


Your are not a very happy person. Have you always been so negative, or has it been a lift learning experience? Karma is a b____ ain't it.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


I think, by and large, cops tend to be representative of the cities they protect. Where I live now, they're petty, hateful, and predatory. And so is the city in which I live, by and large. However, where I used to live, most of them were friendly and helpful unless you were committing a felony. Want better cops? Work on a better community.

Also, a lot of "good cop" stories seem to involve those from the sheriffs office a lot more than local PD's, and I think that's another good indicator of where the troubles lie, which is in their training. Too many police forces are trained to consider citizens to all be enemy combatants, essentially, thus leading to their excesses. Sheriffs, however, tend to end up with a more level-headed view of the communities they serve due to the nature of their positions, and while you'll still get some that are little more than bullies with a badge, most can keep a much better perspective than an ill-train city PD officer. My point being, look to those who have decided to militarize the police as the problem rather than the individual officers, or you'll never see anything change.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 


You do know what a "Straw Man Argument is" don't you

I hope so as you just nailed it

LMAO


James Q. Wilson
Born May 27, 1931
Denver, Colorado
Died March 2, 2012 (aged 80)
Boston, Massachusetts
Residence United States
Nationality American
Fields Political science
Public administration
Sociology
Institutions Boston College
Harvard University (1961–1987)
UCLA Anderson School of Management at UCLA (1987–1997)
Pepperdine University's School of Public Policy (1998–2009)
the White House Task Force on Crime (1966)
National Advisory Commission on Drug Abuse Prevention (1972–73)
Attorney General's Task Force on Violent Crime (1981)
the President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board (1985–90)
President's Council on Bioethics
American Political Science Association
the New England Electric System (now National Grid USA)
Protection One
RAND
State Farm Mutual Insurance
American Enterprise Institute
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Philosophical Society
Human Rights Foundation
Alma mater University of Redlands
University of Chicago
Known for Broken windows theory
Notable awards Lifetime Achievement Award, American Political Science Association
Presidential Medal of Freedom

Link

So yes

More of an expert than your entire list combined

As for what you "Think" I did.. I expect no less.. Hence the Straw Man



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by saturnine_sweet
 


You know the only difference between a Sheriff's deputy and a local police officer is that a deputy patrols unincorporated areas of a county. We all have the same arrest powers. It is just a jurisdictional thing.

I do always hear people say that they hear more positive stories about deputies then local police officers, yet I can never find any concrete evidence to back that up.

If there is any truth to it, perhaps it is the fact that the cities, towns and counties with extremely low populations tend to be patrolled by deputies.

Those deputies generally don't have to deal with the big city, urban crime that local police officers tend to deal with.

They are more likely to respond to the local drunk passed out on the sidewalk then a gang violence call. Those two different types of calls absolutely require different styles of policing.

It is also most likely that the deputies in the small population centers know the citizens on a more personal level.

Just food for thought.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 01:06 PM
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TorqueyThePig
reply to post by saturnine_sweet
 


You know the only difference between a Sheriff's deputy and a local police officer is that a deputy patrols unincorporated areas of a county. We all have the same arrest powers. It is just a jurisdictional thing.

I do always hear people say that they hear more positive stories about deputies then local police officers, yet I can never find any concrete evidence to back that up.

If there is any truth to it, perhaps it is the fact that the cities, towns and counties with extremely low populations tend to be patrolled by deputies.

Those deputies generally don't have to deal with the big city, urban crime that local police officers tend to deal with.

They are more likely to respond to the local drunk passed out on the sidewalk then a gang violence call. Those two different types of calls absolutely require different styles of policing.

It is also most likely that the deputies in the small population centers know the citizens on a more personal level.

Just food for thought.


I live in a very large county. We have 3 towns, 2 that are less than 1000 people and one that is 35k people. Far, far from urban. Our city police are atrocious. Midland, TX cops joke about how when they chase someone over here, they are better of crashing than getting caught by our PD. I serve on various boards and councils in the area, and would typically be considered of a group of people that are very supportive of LEO's (including our county judge and city mayor). So my opinion, if you knew me, would grab your attention. Our sheriffs are well respected and loved. Kind of like you describe.

Head down to Comal County, where New Braunfels is, and the opposite is true. The sheriffs office is reviled, while the city cops are generally respected. It is the only place I have ever been that was that way other than Laramie, WY.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by TorqueyThePig
 


That was more to my point, yes. I do realize they're essentially the same, but it's an entirely different sort of job, nonetheless. Sort of as a point to reemphasize what I was saying about cops reflecting their communities.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


The awful conditions I described from my current locale are also in Texas. My county isn't terribly large, either, but a large portion of the population is...well...not so great. And so the cops tend to reflect that.

As a note, however, from what I've seen of Texas, there seems to be a serious problem with police forces anyways. Way too many stories of not just abuses, like the recent rape case, but also of them behaving like military occupiers, not as a force to serve and protect the public. I've even seen it in nicer communities, though to less of a degree than where I live now. Which is why I felt the need to point out that some of the issues come from those shaping the police forces for our states and communities.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by saturnine_sweet
 


I see your point.

It takes a different mindset and tactics to police urban crime then rural crime.

Those differing tactics and mindset will most likely result in more complaints on officers, weather justified or not.

It will also result in more situations where an officer can go too far in the heat of the moment or make a stupid mistake.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 01:22 PM
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saturnine_sweet
reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


The awful conditions I described from my current locale are also in Texas. My county isn't terribly large, either, but a large portion of the population is...well...not so great. And so the cops tend to reflect that.

As a note, however, from what I've seen of Texas, there seems to be a serious problem with police forces anyways. Way too many stories of not just abuses, like the recent rape case, but also of them behaving like military occupiers, not as a force to serve and protect the public. I've even seen it in nicer communities, though to less of a degree than where I live now. Which is why I felt the need to point out that some of the issues come from those shaping the police forces for our states and communities.


In most communities the poor and downtrodden don't vote. At least, in the communities in my general area. So what ends up happening is the affluent are who control the power structures. What you describe is likely true, and it reflects more what one class of people are willing to allow to be done to another class of people. It really isn't protecting individual rights and supports the mob mentality a little more. But it is how it works.

ETAL according to The History Channel, the whole reason we have illegal plants is due to the above. A majority imposed law meant to discriminate against the poor. Mostly histpanics, or so they said.
edit on 5-12-2013 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 01:23 PM
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Recently, Gillette Police Officer Zach Parker was on one of those routine calls when he saw an opportunity to go above and beyond for the community. Parker was actually in the process of issuing a citation for a pet running at-large when he noticed the homeowner receiving the citation was in need of some assistance and kindness.

“He noticed that the family was having a difficult time making ends meet; he was kind of clued into that when he noticed that their clothes were hanging on a line.”---City Administrator Carter Napier

Officer Parker took it upon himself to raise funds to purchase a washer and dryer for the family.

Napier noted other police officers, as well as others, kicked into the fund.


LINK



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 01:29 PM
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San Diego police officers who rescued man trapped in submerged vehicle hailed as heroes
Two San Diego police officers who risked their lives during a rainstorm to save a driver stranded in a flooded underpass spoke out about their actions.

In a Friday afternoon news conference, Perkins, a 14-year veteran of the force, said, "He was yelling for help, trying to have us come and help him. He was reaching out; I could see him waving his arm out the window yelling for help."

When the officers first arrived at the Witherby Street underpass near Marine Corps Recruit Depot, they saw the driver of a taxi pulling his riders to safety as water rose quickly. The water rushed so fast that within a few minutes, the lights on the top of the cab were completely submerged.

The van was in about two feet of water, but the driver appeared to be OK. The officers said they thought the man would be fine until San Diego Lifeguards and Fire-Rescue teams could arrive, but they were wrong.

"The water was just rising more and more, and at that point, I was like, 'OK, we're probably going to have to go after him,'" said Officer Dudley Ward, a five-year SDPD veteran.

"As the water was rising in the vehicle, that's when I knew something had to be done," said Perkins. "That's when I went around and met with Officer Ward and we decided that we had to go in after him."

The two took off their gun belts and waded into the icy, filthy water. Ward used his non-police issued tool to break the side passenger window, allowing both officers to pull the 20-year-old man out.

Ward and Perkins are being called heroes, but they claim it was all in a day's work. Ward was on overtime when he responded and Perkins responded because of his familiarity with the underpass.

"I don't consider myself a hero; I'm just doing my job," Perkins said.

Ward added, "Anybody else would do the same thing."


LINK



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Im not certain that holds true everywhere, but I'd say it's a good description of where I live. Those with wealth can get away with nearly anything, so their primary concern is to keep everyone else in line. Some of that is a buddy system, if you will, and some of that is bribery, which seems to be rather rampant hereabouts.



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


I don't see anything saying that this so called drunk driver did any damage, yet the cop rushing to the scene( can their even be a scene to rush to if the drunk is on the move?) kills himself and injures an innocent person, and you somehow think this thread is a a positive for cops?

Ha, better luck next time brah.


This just shows how tactless and irresponsible cops are, and how stupid drunk driving laws are.


Positive indeed, screw the police.




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