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Scientists Reveal Extraordinary Sonic Properties of Stonehenge....

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posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by Jim Scott
 

"Don't get too worked up about Stonehenge.
It was built in the 1950's."

I am aware of this so called "theory" if you wish to call it such. Can you please explain the pictures below?





Clearly pre 1950s!


I suppose the Calanais Standing Stones of Scotland and the Carnac standing stones of Brittany were also knocked out around the 1950s?
LoL







www.historic-scotland.gov.uk...
en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 2-12-2013 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Hmm,

My guess is that they would be used for ritual healing.


Most ancient cultures used the seemingly magical power of sound to heal. Sound healing had almost disappeared in the West until the 1930s when acoustic researchers discovered ultrasound and its medical properties. With this discovery, research burgeoned and today the ancient art of sound healing is rapidly developing into a new science. There is now a mass of research into the healing benefits of ultrasound, including its use in breaking up kidney stones and even shrinking tumours. In addition, infrasound and audible sound are now recognized as having immense healing properties.

Technological sound healing devices first appeared in 1928 when German scientist Erwin Schliephake discovered that sound accelerated healing. He created an acoustic device known as the Novasonic that is still available today.


In 1938 another German scientist, Raimar Pohlman, demonstrated ultrasound's therapeutic properties in a Berlin physiotherapy clinic. By the 1950's ultrasound had become a widely used sound healing modality. Even to this day the underlying healing mechanism is not fully understood.

References
Novasonic

Ultrasound



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 04:00 PM
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Jim Scott
Pretty cool.
Don't get too worked up about Stonehenge.
It was built in the 1950's.


There are still people alive who were born before the 1950's... I'm pretty sure people alive today would have noticed/complained about incorrect information being spread about.



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by snoopy11
 

Thanks for the enlightening post. I mentioned ultrasound on the first page, but I'm not sure how much of a possibility that is in this case. Especially since ultrasound is beyond the human hearing range, and I doubt these stones are able to produce from 2mhz to 20mhz. Even if they could, how consistent and persistent would that sound be, and how would they have controlled the variables involved? Also, how would they have focused it? Last but not least. How would they have known about it, since they couldn't hear it?

ETA: Forgot to mention. Even with intrasonic(novasonic), you're still talking 16khz to 20khz. That's just barely in human hearing range, and most humans wouldn't be able to hear it. 16.5 is the range used for silent subliminals, because even if you could hear the chirp it makes, you couldn't understand it.

My point being...How would these people have discovered the properties of something they couldn't even hear? It's really a very interesting idea to consider regarding the ancients.




edit on 12/2/2013 by Klassified because: ETA

edit on 12/2/2013 by Klassified because: grammar



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 04:28 PM
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I have reported on ATS before that Rudston Monolith also shows strange reverberations. If you stand within 1 metre of this stone and talk, you do hear a strong echo. We have Yorkshire ATS ers who can try and back me up.

May also be worth a try with the devils arrows that are only 20 or so miles away



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 04:32 PM
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Klassified

Thanks for the enlightening post. I mentioned ultrasound on the first page, but I'm not sure how much of a possibility that is in this case. Especially since ultrasound is beyond the human hearing range, and I doubt these stones are able to produce up to 20mhz. Even if they could, how consistent and persistent would that sound be, and how would they have controlled the variables involved? Also, how would they have focused it? Last but not least. How would they have known about it, since they couldn't hear it?




Agreed,

I dont think they would have used ultra-sound but that is a modern use of sound healing techniques.

Other healing techniques from the past.



The Aboriginal people of Australia are the first known culture to heal with sound. Their (modern name, didgeridoo) has been used as a healing tool for at least 40,000 years. The Aborigines healed broken bones, muscle tears and illnesses of every kind using their enigmatic musical instrument. Interestingly, the sounds emitted by the yidaki are in alignment with modern sound healing technology. It is becoming apparent that the wisdom of the ancients was based on "sound" principles.


The Egyptian and Babylonian cultures used drums and rattles, two of the earliest known musical instruments. The low frequency sounds from drums and the ultra sound created by rattles are both now known to accelerate healing. A Greek traveler, Demetrius, circa 200 B.C., wrote that the Egyptians used vowel sounds in their rituals:



"In Egypt, when priests sing hymns to the Gods they sing the seven vowels in due succession and the sound has such euphony that men listen to it instead of the flute and the lyre."

The healing chapel at Deir el-Bahari, Thebes, was dedicated to Amenhotep-son-of-Hapu, a deified healing saint closely associated with ''Imhotep'' who is largely recognized under the title of 'physician.' Imhotep's repute was so tremendous that, 1,500 years after his death, the Greeks identified him with their healing god Asclepius. These two deified men ''Amenhotep-son-of-Hapu and Imhote'' were usually worshipped together in the same Egyptian healing temples.


Pythagoras (circa 500 BC) is credited as being the first person to use "music as medicine. The flute and the lyre were two of the primary instruments used by Pythagoras and his followers for healing purposes. He is also credited with being the first to understand musical intervals from his work with the monochord, a single-stringed instrument in which the string tension was established by a fixed weight.


In the Greco-Roman period healing temples were used for "incubation", a process in which patients underwent "dream sleep", among other known modalities. It seems likely that music was used therapeutically during their stay and the reverberant spaces of the temples enhanced the efficiency of acoustic instruments, a function of the solid stonewalls of temples and sanatoria.
Of Pythagorus Iamblichus noted that:
"Pythagoras considered that music contributed greatly to health, if used in the right way "He called his method 'musical medicine" To the accompaniment of Pythagoras" his followers would sing in unison certain chants" At other times his disciples employed music as medicine, with certain melodies composed to cure the passions of the psyche...anger and aggression."



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by snoopy11
 

Interesting you would mention those. Even the bible makes mention of such, if read from the perspective we're discussing...
1Samuel 16

Now the Spirit of the LORD departed from Saul, and a harmful spirit from the LORD tormented him. And Saul's servants said to him, “Behold now, a harmful spirit from God is tormenting you. Let our lord now command your servants who are before you to seek out a man who is skillful in playing the lyre, and when the harmful spirit from God is upon you, he will play it, and you will be well.”


And whenever the harmful spirit from God was upon Saul, David took the lyre and played it with his hand. So Saul was refreshed and was well, and the harmful spirit departed from him.

Taking all of this together. It seems as though Stonehenge might have had more than a few purposes.
edit on 12/2/2013 by Klassified because: eta



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Erm wasn't there a few days ago a bunch of articles about some geologist and his team that claimed the rocks were never from Wales, but from a hill about a mile away from the site ?

I have one of those articles here




By using X-rays, he showed that the rocks actually came from Carn Goedog. BBC reports:

Dr Bevins's team are able to say so categorically that they have discovered the source of the spotted dolerites thanks to a range of laser mass spectrometry techniques which analyse both the chemical composition of the rock and the microbiology present when it was formed.

He says that the chance of them having originated anywhere other than Carn Goedog is "statistically-speaking, infinitesimally small".



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 05:04 PM
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Any solid object no matter how massive will have a resonant frequency,meaning it's whole structure vibrates easiest when subjected to a certain frequency.It could be that they chose the dimensions of the various stones knowing that they would resonate better than if they were cube shaped,this could easily be proven with scaled down models even 5000 years ago when the 'henge was being built.But something that massive would need an equally massive amount of energy to bring it to resonance,something they obviously didn't have all those years ago.
It's a bit sensationalist to say that they have revealed something extraordinary,when in fact it's been known for a VERY long time (Maybe as far back as the Greeks?) that certain types of rocks do resonate easier than others do.This isn't a practical way to heal because the energy used to bring them to resonance would be a much more efficient way of doing it.
But MAYBE they did have knowledge of this fact,and MAYBE this is the reason they didn't use just any old stones that they could find locally and not have to suffer the logistics of moving them across rough country some time before the A5 had been built.Or MAYBE the site they took the stones from had some sort of Druid significance that we haven't figured out yet.
I visited the 'henge about 20 years ago and didn't feel anything special or different from when I visit the inlaws,a fast food outlet or the Post Office.All I see is a load of big stones that an ancient people attempted to build as a combined place of worship and a celestial calendar.It's a shame they never finished it properly I reckon,now that would have been something even more special!



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 06:03 PM
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Thill
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Erm wasn't there a few days ago a bunch of articles about some geologist and his team that claimed the rocks were never from Wales, but from a hill about a mile away from the site ?

I have one of those articles here




By using X-rays, he showed that the rocks actually came from Carn Goedog. BBC reports:

Dr Bevins's team are able to say so categorically that they have discovered the source of the spotted dolerites thanks to a range of laser mass spectrometry techniques which analyse both the chemical composition of the rock and the microbiology present when it was formed.

He says that the chance of them having originated anywhere other than Carn Goedog is "statistically-speaking, infinitesimally small".

The wording in that article is misleading. The scientists aren't saying the stones came from a mile away from 'Stonehenge', they're saying a mile away from the originally thought 'source'.
Either way, the blue stones came from the Preseli (SP?) mountains in Wales, which means the distance they were transported (by neolithic peoples) is still roughly 150 miles...
edit on 2-12-2013 by lostgirl because: grammer improvement



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 06:21 PM
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I'm so sorry...although a little off topic, I just had to share this with you...well, it is tuneful!



Perhaps, we should try to contact this guy, stop his sleepless nights.


On topic...this thread rocks!



edit on 2-12-2013 by solargeddon because: Thread not op...doh!



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 07:35 PM
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i believe in the sonic levitation theory ( that explains the pyramids,stonehenge, baalbek,etc) but why and how did we lost the knowledge?

the tibetan monks, the coral castle guy they knew the technique but how did they acquired it?
edit on 2-12-2013 by Picollo30 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Thank you for yet another thought-provoking thread! Happily, I had some time to follow up on some of my own thoughts, suggested by what's already here.
A woman named Roslyn Strong did a translation of part of a fascinating book written by Pierre Méreaux, titled Carnac: Des Pierres Pour Les Vivantes (Carnac: Stones For The Living).

Here's a rather incomplete summary taken from the Wikipedia entry on Carnac:


Studies by Pierre Méreaux, who spent 30 years researching the stones in field studies, are well known. He generally rejects the "cult of the dead", arguing that the dolmens were instead perhaps used as primitive seismic instruments, Brittany being the most seismically-active area of France. In particular, he argues controversially that Brittany would have been even more seismically active back then, due to the influx of water with the retreating ice. He also posits correlations between the location and orientation of menhirs, and those of seismic fault lines. He also goes so far as to claim that the balancing of large stones on delicate points would act as an effective earthquake detector: "the heavy tables of these monuments with their dizzying overhangs must have devilishly balanced on their three feet, at the slightest shock. As an earthquake observation station, we could not do better today.


It's a fascinating read (around 21 pages if I remember correctly), but with the caveat that you'll need to be fueled by a strong curiosity about European Megalithic structures to get through it.

It's in the form of a 2-part .PDF:

Part 1

Part 2

It's hosted on the NEARA (New England Antiquities Research Association) site, but deals with a book written about Carnac & other European Megalithic structures. I'm aware that some ATS'ers regard NEARA's ideas about North American sites as invalid, but please, let's not divert the thread with a debate about that subject, as it's irrelevant here.

Here is a short article detailing some archeological clues that would seem to back up the idea of bluestone being historically thought of as a healing substance.

When quartz or other crystalline substances are subject to enough pressure, a phenomenon known as Piezoelectricity results:


Piezoelectricity /piˌeɪzoʊˌilɛkˈtrɪsɪti/ is the electric charge that accumulates in certain solid materials (such as crystals, certain ceramics, and biological matter such as bone, DNA and various proteins) in response to applied mechanical stress. The word piezoelectricity means electricity resulting from pressure.


The thing that occurred to me is that the sonic properties of the Stonehenge bluestones might only be part of the story. The stones have significant quartz content, & as someone else pointed out, the "ringing" tones are caused by concentrations of metallic ores in the stones. If you consider that, as postulated by Méreaux, an earthquake might provide enough pressure on the quartz crystals in the bluestones to generate a piezoelectric charge, then maybe the metallic ore enables the stones to hold & dissipate the charge slowly like a capacitor, giving time for people back in the Megalithic day to come to the structure & to reap the possible healing realignments to their personal magnetic fields caused by the temporarily increased magnetic fields of the blustones.

IMO, in this context, the idea of some Megalithic structures being "seismic observation stations" doesn't seem so far-fetched. I love stuff like this! Nice to have the time to pursue it for now, & nice to have threads like yours, Slayer, to inspire that pursuit. Thanks again!


edit on 12/2/13 by BuzzCory because: Aw, heck, I almost didn't need to edit this one!



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 10:13 PM
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How about we add another twist to this gin martini. All speculation of course.

A Momentous Shift for Sonic Levitation



Researchers have already developed several levitation methods. For example, electrostatic or magnetic fields can exert a concentrated force on an object to counteract gravity. But these fields work only on metallic substances or materials with magnetic properties.


Who knows, maybe a freak'n portal will open up one day. Or, throw a big pot in the middle of this thing and we could call it the world's oldest microwave.



posted on Dec, 3 2013 @ 02:59 AM
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Here in New Zealand we have a stonehenge.
I went a couple of weeks ago. Crazy Acoustics there. Standing inside the circle you can get a good echo going. I wonder what would happen if you had a whole choir in there or some sound machine.

A bit about Stonehenge Aotearoa

"Built on the same scale as Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain in England. Stonehenge Aotearoa is not a replica. It is a complete and working structure designed and built for its precise location in the Wairarapa region of New Zealand."

or you can have a look here

Stonehenge Aotearoa



posted on Dec, 3 2013 @ 03:35 AM
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I read the Welsh name for Wales is Cymru and it made me think of sound and how the Welsh love singing , I feel there could be a huge connection to sound and the Welsh. 1%



posted on Dec, 3 2013 @ 09:03 AM
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superman2012
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Instantly reminded me of this:




I can't view Youtube videos as I'm at work, but could you tell me where in PA this is located? I live in PA!



posted on Dec, 3 2013 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 



Begs the question if Egypt did the same thing with sonic levitation maybe ?? IDK

another unsolved mysterious object...
MM wonder if these stone carvings are legit !! ??? IDK if they are..




but this is as it seems



Dendera light
en.wikipedia.org...

OK I guess it is right next to the dendera light what do you see!! slayer69 ??

it looks like a Microphone Device does it not ?? well in the modern world that is.. Could be..?












edit on 3-12-2013 by Wolfenz because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-12-2013 by Wolfenz because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2013 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by jimmyx
 


The point is that the natural properties of the rocks can be used with relevance to mystical activities, in those days they had less science to go on*, and so they explored more intuitive methods of healing.

* Or did they - were they perhaps mimicking the techniques of something/someone else?



posted on Dec, 3 2013 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by Wolfenz
 

Interesting you would post these...



One of our ex long time members, whose name started with a Z, had a particular interest in whatever that object is in the photos. If I remember correctly, he felt it was possible this device was for speaking into. Don't know if he was right, but it is interesting that any time I've seen images of this "staff?", it is usually near someones mouth. Obviously, that isn't conclusive, but it is curious. Especially the second image.




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