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German Archaeologists Find 600 Ancient Seals, Amulets in Turkey

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posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 11:09 AM
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German Archaeologists Find 600 Ancient Seals, Amulets in Turkey

Scientists from the University of Münster have unearthed 600 amulets, stamp and cylinder seals dating from the 7th through the 4th centuries BC at the archaeological site of the ancient city of Doliche (modern Dülük) in southeastern Turkey.

“Such large amounts of seal consecrations are unheard-of in any comparable sanctuary,” said Prof Engelbert Winter, director of excavations.

The artifacts were found at the sacred site of the storm and weather god Jupiter Dolichenus.

“The amazingly large number proves how important seals and amulets were for the worshipping of the god to whom they were consecrated as votive offerings. Thus, they provide a surprisingly vivid and detailed insight into the faith of the time,” Prof Winter said.

The seals as well as scarabs, made of glass, stone and quartz ceramics, were mostly crafted in a high-quality manner.


Here is a cool find. I dd a search and didn't see anything posted on this one. I'd love to be able to actually see these first hand. Hopefully they'll make the Museum circuit in my lifetime.





posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 11:16 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 

Some look very Sumerian in design.



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 11:16 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


The monks would have had many seals to mark the writings they did for many people when copying them. I wonder if there could be a bunch of documents around the area, they sometimes stored them close by. It may be that the site is a Jupiter site but there could be some reason why there are so many stamps there.

Back then, people who could write documents up or translate them were very important to the power that be.



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 





The artifacts, identified as late Babylonian, local Syrian Achaemenid and Levantine seals, were found at the sacred site of the storm and weather god Jupiter Dolichenus, one of the most important deities of the Roman Empire

www.universityherald.com...


This is really interesting because the cult of Jupiter Dolichenus was one of the "Mystery Cults" of ancient Rome that celebrated deities from cultures that pre-dated the late Roman period during which the cults existed by hundreds and hundreds of years. It was sort of the same thing as us playing at being neolithic pagans in 2013. The "Mystery Cults" might be seen as roughly equivalent to our "New Age'.



The cult gained popularity in the 2nd century AD and reached a peak under the Severan dynasty in the early 3rd century AD. At least seventeen temples are known to have been built in Rome and the provinces which, while substantial, is far below the popularity enjoyed by Mithras, Isis or Cybele.

Unlike these Mystery Cults, the worship of Jupiter Dolichenus was very fixed on its oriental origins and the cult soon died out following the fall of the city of Doliche to the Sassanids in the mid-3rd century AD.

en.wikipedia.org...


In other words, Ancient Romans were deeply fascinated by, and craved connection with these ancient cultures and religions that pre-dated their own by centuries. Just as we do today. So I have to ask myself, did the Jupiter Cultists actually collect these up from all over the ancient world and dump them in the temple of their foreign god as tribute?

Or are they Ancient Roman knock-offs.

Neat post, S69.




P.S. Just for fun, this one, for instance, is the Star of Ishtar, or Isis, the crescent Moon was thought to be her 'horns'.



It's a trip to see amulets related to so many of the different Roman "Mystery Cults" concentrated in one location; I think I see some Mithras stuff in there as well.




edit on 1-12-2013 by Bybyots because: cool



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by Bybyots
 


Thank you for your contribution. Yeah, I was wondering if anybody else would catch that.

edit on 1-12-2013 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


It really has my mind reeling. Mainly because I am just not knowledgeable enough to fill in whole huge blind-spots that might help me understand what these folks were up to.

So, say these amulets and seals were the prized possessions (they are so beautiful, and the archaeologists seem clear that the objects far pre-date the temple they were found in ) of Roman citizens from all over these lands that the Romans had conquered and colonized. The Romans were very egalitarian in their approach to the religions of the peoples that they overcame. Anyway, what would cause everyone to suddenly go to the nearest temple and offer possibly their most prized religious objects up?

Somehow in my mind right now it seems like something very dramatic may have been happening in the world at that time. But I've got those blind-spots. I dunno probably wouldn't take too much time to slap the dates together to see if it makes sense. That is, if there are enough dates to slap in the first place.

Nice rabbit-hole, man.


edit on 1-12-2013 by Bybyots because: . : .



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by Bybyots
 

Yeah, more to this story, Bybyots, hrmmm.

Slayer got some interesting threads going. There may be snow on the chimney, but he got the ol' fire down below.



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 

Fascinated by what appears to be wire bezel.
Love it
I am thinking if you look for the wire bezel technique and what date and culture worked with this you might get some answers, I searched a little didn't find anything.
edit on 033131p://bSunday2013 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 03:19 PM
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I think the best place to start is look at the history of ancient Rome.

Founded approximately around 7th century BCE, this corresponds to the dating of the temple.

Hmm, Rome is rumored to be founded by the Trojans, maybe this explains such a collection of offerings to the King of the gods. It was a response to the destruction of Troy perhaps?

www.exovedate.com...



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


i was thinking rome, and I don't think these pieces would have belonged to the wealthy,



posted on Dec, 2 2013 @ 01:46 AM
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I can see Nimrod, Semiramis, Dagon, EL etc. Definitely Babylonian.

S+F




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