Ison: Was it hidden from us?

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posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 12:41 PM
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You know the most scary thing about all of this ISON nonsense : The unbelievably poor grasp of basic science that so many people have and yet they have the right to vote ! We're doomed !!!




posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 12:45 PM
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0bserver1
reply to post by Denylgnorance
 


Whoa WTF .. uhm can anybody find the NASA link before its gone I want to see the link.. It's getting really weird now..


Here you go it on a few frame only
Big Disk

or here
FaceBook
edit on 1-12-2013 by Trillium because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by PizzaVan
 


I thought they sent some big electromagnetic disc or such to try to capture one not all that long ago?



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 02:48 PM
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alfa1

crzayfool
I don't understand the need for an Approach Camera, a Perihelion Camera and an Exit Camera. Why wasn't there just 'A' Sun Camera..?


If you're talking about the SDO, there was in fact just one spacecraft that had to be pointed in three different directions at the different times to get the approach, perihelion and then exit of the comet.


So was there any evidence that this is what was happening over the time period we were given?
Was it possible to see the movement from one angle to the next? Surely we'd see the Sun slewing across our screens.



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 03:11 PM
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TommyD1966


If ISON had come from the opposite side of the solar system to which we presume it did I could fully agree with you, but considering it came from the same "side" of Space that Orion resides, depending on what way up you look at it, I have to keep an open mind... Another thing with this is "Where actually is Orion?" - we can see it on simulations and star charts etc but considering it's over 1300 light-years away from us "How far does a solar-system or star constellation visually drift over those distances?"- taking into consideration the space-time / radiation warping effects of gravity, or are the charts and simulations forecast and predicted accurately in their digital and paper representations?


Over 1300 light years from us? That makes no sense. It is a constellation -- many stars, all at various distances away.

The brightest stars are from about 200 LY to 1000 LY away -- but they are all different.

Not sure what you are trying to say there.


I was referring to the Nebula in the middle of it - sorry I should have been clearer on this (isn't that where many "Alien wanters" suspect the Anunaki and other such ET species are from?).

I thought i'd only state the distance of the Nebula or I'd have been here quite a while naming all the stars within the Orion constellation and their individual distances...which is a bit silly considering it's not at all serious.

What we can all hopefully agree on though is that what ever star we speak of, or Nebula for that matter, they are all outside our solar system so the same visual drifting question still applies regardless of how many light-years, 1300 or 13; they are still all far enough for light to experience the space-time warping effects of gravity.

Do you know what I am trying to say now?



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 03:57 PM
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crzayfool

TommyD1966


If ISON had come from the opposite side of the solar system to which we presume it did I could fully agree with you, but considering it came from the same "side" of Space that Orion resides, depending on what way up you look at it, I have to keep an open mind... Another thing with this is "Where actually is Orion?" - we can see it on simulations and star charts etc but considering it's over 1300 light-years away from us "How far does a solar-system or star constellation visually drift over those distances?"- taking into consideration the space-time / radiation warping effects of gravity, or are the charts and simulations forecast and predicted accurately in their digital and paper representations?


Over 1300 light years from us? That makes no sense. It is a constellation -- many stars, all at various distances away.

The brightest stars are from about 200 LY to 1000 LY away -- but they are all different.

Not sure what you are trying to say there.


Yup, now I get it!

Thanks for clearing that up!

I was referring to the Nebula in the middle of it - sorry I should have been clearer on this (isn't that where many "Alien wanters" suspect the Anunaki and other such ET species are from?).

I thought i'd only state the distance of the Nebula or I'd have been here quite a while naming all the stars within the Orion constellation and their individual distances...which is a bit silly considering it's not at all serious.

What we can all hopefully agree on though is that what ever star we speak of, or Nebula for that matter, they are all outside our solar system so the same visual drifting question still applies regardless of how many light-years, 1300 or 13; they are still all far enough for light to experience the space-time warping effects of gravity.

Do you know what I am trying to say now?



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 04:17 PM
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yorkshirelad
You know the most scary thing about all of this ISON nonsense : The unbelievably poor grasp of basic science that so many people have and yet they have the right to vote ! We're doomed !!!


It's even worse when they are the majority vote on an issue, blinded by sheer ignorance.



posted on Dec, 1 2013 @ 09:44 PM
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crzayfool
So was there any evidence that this is what was happening over the time period we were given?
Was it possible to see the movement from one angle to the next? Surely we'd see the Sun slewing across our screens.



It wasn't real time video.
The cameras take images spaced at regular intervals, but one good way of seeing a "movie" of those images is to go here and request images of a date range:
2013-11-28 00:00:00
2013-11-29 00:00:00

You can see that for most of the time, the camera is pointing straight at the sun, but about the time of perihelion (28th November, 18:14 GMT) you can see the camera move offset to point to where the comet would be at that time... then afterwards go back to looking at the sun.
Some of the images even show a bit of "trail" from the camera having moved.
edit on pmSundayfpm1 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)





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