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Ison: Was it hidden from us?

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posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 08:48 PM
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Here is an animated gif with an hours worth of AIA images from today just to show how little the sun actually moves over that period.



If you notice the prominence in the center of the sun only fades in the last 2 frames. Also you probably didn't realize the image was actually moving until it snaps back to replay the gif. If you watch the video when his "still image of the sun" AIA images start over you'll notice that the sun does skip just like in this animated gif. Plus this gif actually has an extra 15 minutes of view time I think...

Although I believe the information provided in the video is not correct, I do not have any explanation as to why there was nothing picked up by the SDO spacecraft yesterday. The only thing I can think of is that the comet did not reflect enough light for the probe to be able to see it, since the spacecraft is designed to look directly at the sun.
edit on 29-11-2013 by SolarObserver because: added extra stuff

edit on 29-11-2013 by SolarObserver because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 08:56 PM
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So why is NASA holding back information and spreading disinformation? What's the point, what's the gameplan?



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 08:57 PM
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AlphaExray
It is no different from those who look to
*USGS for accurate earthquake data,
*or noaa for buoy data in active zones,
*or the haarp spectrograph
*on this or any other celetial body


All of which are very very bad examples to prove a point.
Why?
Because each and every one of these examples used to "prove" that "the government" is controlling and filtering data to the public, are in fact areas where the information is open and freely available to the public in ways that nobody can control.
And where private hobbyists also examine such data.

* Cannot hide earthquake data from citizens who have seismomenters.
* Cannot hide sea levels from people with boats, or tsunamis from people who live in the area.
* Cannot hide "haarp spectrographs" from hobbyists who built their own magnetometers.
* Cannot hide celestial bodies from people who own a telescope.

But what you can do is stay indoors stuck to the internet and never bother trying to "see for yourself".
If you dont try to see for yourself, then you have nobody except yourself to blame for the fact that you now have to rely on others to get your information.



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:05 PM
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I decided to do an experiment to help explain my earlier comment about the spacecraft not being able to see it because it wasn't bright enough.

If you look at this picture:

Link to full size

It is a picture of a tea candle next to a 1 million candle power tactical flashlight. You can BARELY see the candle light there because the picture is being over exposed by the flashlight. This is by no means an exact replication of the sun and the light reflecting off a comet, but you get the idea



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:08 PM
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reply to post by SolarObserver
 
Good point. Although the live stream was approx 4 hours and not the hour the OP showed I would of thought something would of changed. So, I guess the only way to actually know is if someone has the entire feed to see if the feed is looped.

I agree that someone other than a Youtube person would of noticed this.



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by SolarObserver
 


Doing further reading and the SDO has been used to attempt to view sun grazing comets only four times and are 2-2 so far.

That's two visible and two that weren't.



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:12 PM
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reply to post by AlphaHawk
 


That makes sense to me. Like I said, my idea about it not reflecting enough light to be picked up by SDO is just an idea

edit on 29-11-2013 by SolarObserver because: dang spelling




posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:27 PM
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reply to post by SolarObserver
 


That's a good one, I'm sure that is what NASA will use as an excuse


Seriously though, this still leaves the problem with the lack of movement of the sun flares.
Can anybody weigh in on this?



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by Village Idiot
 


I don't believe you looked at the animated gif in my post at the top of page 2. Look at the prominences off the east and west limbs of the disk during the animation. They don't move either.
edit on 29-11-2013 by SolarObserver because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by SolarObserver
 


It's not really the light form the comet we're seeing, we don't even see the nucleus.


When SDO looks for a comet it does not see the dust and ion tails seen in a comet far from the Sun. We see oxygen ions, oxygen atoms with some electrons stripped off, glowing when they are hit by the hot electrons in the corona. The AIA telescopes normally look at iron ions, but the enormous amount of oxygen that comes off a comet allows that element to emit brighter for a while after the comet passes. The images we showed yesterday were our best guesses for which AIA passbands would show bright emissions from Comet ISON as it flew past the Sun. They are the passbands that showed Comet Lovejoy in December 2011 and the earlier comet in June 2011.


sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov...



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by AlphaHawk
 


Thanks for this
I assumed we were looking for reflected light off the core.



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:36 PM
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Village Idiot
Seriously though, this still leaves the problem with the lack of movement of the sun flares.
Can anybody weigh in on this?



Its not "live" real time video.


Since 1 August 2010, EIT has reverted back to its original observing mode, taking images of the Sun only twice per day.

link

I really dont know why people are getting excited about this.
Its been like that for years.



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by SolarObserver
 


I see, sorry I missed that.
So what they are saying is that the SDO concentrates only on what part of the comet is still solid?
And what we are seeing is debris?



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by Village Idiot
 


There were no flares to see.

The sun was dead calm as it were.

Watch the first part of this video from September:



It covers about 5 hours and nothing moves except when the flare erupts.



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 10:01 PM
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reply to post by AlphaHawk
 


Thank you for that, much appreciated.



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 10:05 PM
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AlphaHawk
reply to post by Nootropic
 


No I don't think the entire organisation was in on it, I don't think anyone was in on it.

During the live feed, they had two of the leading scientists what built and work with the SDO commentating.

If anyone was going to know if something was up with the feed, it would be them and they showed no signs of being in on it, rather they showed signs of slight embarrassment and disappointment due to the comet not showing up.

Like I just said, Lovejoy showed up wonderfully and they were expecting the same thing to happen for ISON.

So why ISON and not Lovejoy?






I don't disagree with you, and wasn't implying by my thread title that the "hidden" part was necessarily due to an intentional conspiracy. Just that it didn't show up when it should have, unless it did fully disintegrate before it got to the camera's views, which is now known that it did not disintegrate fully.




posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by 1Providence1
 


Well according to the SDO team, this is the second one to not show up.



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by Village Idiot
 





By the way, it takes no effort at all to make NASA look bad, they doing a marvelous job all by themselves.



For the record I happen to agree with that.

But I'm not try'n to say certain people aren't entitle to put up videos.
I have a foul mouth myself but I wouldn't brag about or boast it on you tube.
For one thing it makes the video less viewable. Certain venues like maybe
this one won't usually put up with it.

"sall I meant.



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


Sorry, you seem to have misinterpreted my statement. I more than encourage people to seek out information from their own sources, and investigate all data that is presented to them. The three examples I chose, are often referred to here on ATS, and are all notoriously unreliable. USGS in particular has been running quite an elaborate algorithm to skew data collected and redistributed on their database. It has been a bone of contention among international geologists for several years now. Using your own seismograph, or verifying the results posted through the issuing educational institutions has been how many of us have come to realise the unreliable nature of just taking one government website's word for it. NOAA Buoys have been routinely unavailable to the general public in areas where extensive tectonic activity has been recorded, yet their transmissions were still being received and the data available to countries tasked to maintain them, yet people looking here often have no clue what is going on because of their reliance on the one website approach to data. As for HAARP, no comment. I don’t usually engage in rebuttals, but the notion that I would encourage ignorance or discourage self reliance bothers me.

AX

FTNWO



posted on Nov, 29 2013 @ 11:19 PM
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reply to post by 1Providence1
 


ISON

This was stated as updated, the brightness seems to have increased as it went around...I thought this was one of the better views.




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