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Vietnamese whale like creature

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posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 07:10 AM
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Tell me what do you think about it. Plenty of ppl around it. Some say the language of those folks could be Khmer.
Was it sucked above the clouds by the storm?
Check it here:
Link


edit on 25-11-2013 by Gemwolf because: Fixed link




posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 07:20 AM
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It's a whale.


The video, which was found on a Chinese site with little in the way of an explanation, is most likely a recording of a beached, deceased whale being loaded on a trailer for burial. Though it seems that the video is actually from Cambodia, it may be similar to a cultural practice in Vietnam. In Vietnam, whales–dead or alive–are considered harbingers of good luck, and fishermen are always happy to see them in their waters. However, when one of them shows up dead, the fishermen will work together to pull the creatures to shore for entombment. The animals are absolutely not to be hunted or eaten.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 07:22 AM
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reply to post by PapagiorgioCZ
 


Ooh I love sea monsters! According to the Huffington Post, Loren Coleman says it is a Baleen Whale, whatever that might be. I prefer to think of it as a sea beast.

Whatever it is, it's a scary thing!



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 07:26 AM
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Fin Whale




posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 07:28 AM
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That appears to be a Sperm Whale according to the comments on this video page.

Edit: I don't agree with the type but I do agree that it's a whale.


PapagiorgioCZ
Was it sucked above the clouds by the storm?


Very unlikely that the carcass of a moist, fleshy creature of such size would survive a fall from such height intact.
edit on 25-11-2013 by SocialCUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 07:30 AM
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reply to post by PapagiorgioCZ
 


It looks like a Sei whale. Relatively young too.

There's an outside chance it's a Blue Whale (juvenile) but it appears a little too streamlined for a Blue. Poor thing is decomposing and covered in mud so it's hard to tell from the vid.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 07:34 AM
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reply to post by PapagiorgioCZ
 


Looks like any other normal beached baleen whale, a fin whale or a sei whale??

Can't really see the tail in the video, so no solid conclusion.

Peace



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 07:37 AM
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reply to post by Zarniwoop
 



The animals are absolutely not to be hunted or eaten.


"Not eaten" because their bodies are considered toxic waste. Whales are at the top of their food chain, too.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 08:57 AM
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very interesting...4 different whale types claimed by 4 different people. And everyone thinks...he got it right.

How very human...



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by PapagiorgioCZ
 


Ah, the elusive Vietnamese Mud Whale



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:31 AM
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In few sources i read it was nowhere near the sea but I can see some water under the truck.Probably nothing to see here.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by MarioOnTheFly
 



very interesting...4 different whale types claimed by 4 different people. And everyone thinks...he got it right.

At least they're trying, while all you do is criticise.

Riffrafter came closest. In fact, it's a Bryde's whale — unmistakably identifiable (if you know your whales) by the three ridges on the head — the central one running from the blowholes to the rostrum, and the other two flaring away to either side. Only Bryde's whales have this feature, and it is one of the ways in which we distinguish them from sei or fin whales. Here's a picture:


In the video, you can see the triple ridge quite distinctly when the animal is being lifted on to the trailer.

Another telltale feature is the tiny but clearly defined, sickle-shaped dorsal fin about two-thirds of the way down the animal's back. I spent some time in the company of a Bryde's whale this April, so I'm confident of the identification.

Baleen whales aren't a species but a family of species, to which blue, fin, sei and Bryde's whales all belong. It's hard to tell these whales apart (I've had a bit of experience at this). Blues, by the way, are pretty streamlined in spite of their size.

Sperm whales belong to a different family, the odontocetes or toothed whales. They have huge blunt heads that account for about a third of their length, and no real dorsal fin: just a nub. Here's a picture.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 10:37 AM
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Already posted,

its Cambodians obviously speaking khmer..

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 10:40 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


Thanks for that explanation.



I spent some time in the company of a Bryde's whale this April, so I'm confident of the identification.


Wow.......I envy you!!!

Peace
edit on 25-11-2013 by operation mindcrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by operation mindcrime
 



Wow.......I envy you!!!

I consider myself very lucky. My life has had quite a few whales and dolphins in it lately.

By the way, the whale in the video was probably stranded during Typhoon Heiyan, which caused such devastation in the Philippines a few weeks ago. The location looks like a mangrove swamp.


edit on 25/11/13 by Astyanax because: of telltale information.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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SocialCUT
...
Very unlikely that the carcass of a moist, fleshy creature of such size would survive a fall from such height intact.
edit on 25-11-2013 by SocialCUT because: (no reason given)


The bowl of petunias said "Oh no, not again"



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


so it's in fact the fifth type of whale...

are you really really really sure this time ?





posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 11:54 AM
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reply to post by MarioOnTheFly
 


Yes, I'm sure. And you can be, too. Watch the video. Note the three ridges on the whale's head. Then follow the links in my post, which will tell you the same as I: the triple ridge is unique to Bryde's whales.


edit on 25/11/13 by Astyanax because: it might have been a genuine inquiry.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 04:42 PM
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Well it is most definitely not a a bowl of petunias either!



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 04:43 PM
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cartenz

SocialCUT
...
Very unlikely that the carcass of a moist, fleshy creature of such size would survive a fall from such height intact.
edit on 25-11-2013 by SocialCUT because: (no reason given)


The bowl of petunias said "Oh no, not again"



next time I shall endeavor to read at least a few posts down, that or learn to fly so I can quickly forget again...




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