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Public Education was designed to create obedient workers and soldiers who won't question authority.

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posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 01:25 AM
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Private schools use the same formal education system.

Capitalists supported formal education in public and private schools because the system followed what took place in businesses.




posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 02:15 AM
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robodrag0n
I don't disagree that America's education system is far from perfect. What I'm having trouble is collectively analyzing my own experiences, comparing that to the criticisms about my generation, and reading threads like these. I mean, often I've heard Gen Y called the "Entitlement Generation" of spoiled brats who want free handouts. My generation apparently suffers from special-snowflake syndrome and a desire to be unique, yet here I'm hearing we're all raised to function like a collective.

I'm mean, I don't get it.

First I hear I'm an indoctrinated fool who can't think for himself; toiling and working for a system of oppression that squashed my passions in the name of making me a "better worker" and yet here I find myself, pursuing my dreams in college.

As I think back to my elementary teachers, I remember that each and every one of them treated my classmates and I as human beings. One of my middle school teachers urged me to join a club called MESA (Math, Engineering, Science, Achievement), and my high school teachers stressed cultivating interests, be them art, literature, or music.

None as much as I can remember played dictator and oppressed us, and I think I came out fine.
I'm literally at a loss here!



Someone asked Howard Hughes about college graduates once,
never having graduated himself, and he said "I love college
graduates. That's all I hire."

Get it?

College teaches one to work for someone else, not themselves.
Like Howard.




‘Never make a decision. Let someone else make it and then if it turns out to be the wrong one, you can disclaim it, and if it is the right one you can abide by it.’

- Howard Hughes


Howard Hughes formed the Hughes Aircraft Corporation to pursue his interest in aviation. Hughes Aircraft has 6054 U.S. patents.

Mike Grouchy



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 04:01 AM
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I've always had issues with the school system. I'm a university grad but it bothers me to see that many people worship education like a god. Becuase education gives one a higher opportunity to succeed in this broken system...

...I know how ridiculous that sounds.



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 09:18 AM
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ahnggk
I've always had issues with the school system. I'm a university grad but it bothers me to see that many people worship education like a god. Becuase education gives one a higher opportunity to succeed in this broken system...

...I know how ridiculous that sounds.


the only people that should go to college are the highest of IQ, the next lower should go to Vo-tech, then the rest shouldn't go at all..

Having an education and a less than stellar IQ leads to drastic decisions.. just look at the world today.



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 10:15 AM
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Here we go again with the victim mentality again, but I do understand what the OP is saying.

Just because a child is in a public or private educational system doesn't mean they are going to come out like little obedient robots.

There is nothing wrong with the educational system if the parents DO THEIR job to instill the critical thinking skills outside the school curriculum.

If children are taught in this particular way, and they have the ability to critically think as they are attending they come out empowered, and now they have the best of both worlds.

No matter what type of system is set up people will always see it as indoctrination, which is true to a certain extent, but we do have the ability to point out to our children the fallacy's that exist in the world. It's up to them to take those tools and decide for themselves.

The one think that schools do not teach is critical thinking skills and I believe the reason for this is not because they don't want to it's because they don't actually have the time to answer all the questions.

Just like at the University level, you go in, they profess, you take notes, and really have to dig in for yourself.


Peace,

RT

edit on 26-11-2013 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 11:05 AM
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reply to post by mikegrouchy
 


Sure, I don't doubt college is all about teaching you the skills necessary to work for your major; I thought that's what college was meant for. The whole purpose of attending college is to learn the skills necessary for the career you want to pursue.

In the end though, I still have the fundamental choice to work after I graduate or become a squatter in an abandoned home.
edit on 26-11-2013 by robodrag0n because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by halfmask
 


It's a big leap to suggest our education system is not here to educate. Even if our education system is here to mobilize us and make us obedient to authority, it still must teach us core principles and give us the knowledge we need to both enact and potentially evolve the system we're dependent upon. Only in la la land would you treat every child attending public school as a servant of the state. The next Bobby or Jessica could be a famous innovator or designer or you-name-it. You'd want to enable that, not kill it. We don't live in a perfect enough world to withhold giving at least some education to everyone as insurance against the unknown.

I get the feeling people here are just wanting to do some beheading, particularly the kind which involves rich persons or persons of authority.

What's so bad about highly intelligent people or leadership types or ambitious peoples? They're who they're. There will always be different classes of workers because people aren't equal. I can't change the fact our universe produces so much diversity, so I must do what I can. I've never been angry that somebody else could be more motivated than me or smarter or better at something. Rather, I'm concerned with finding out who I am and what I'm good at and striving to improve on it.

I think people want a silver bullet to solve every problem. I don't think this is it. In fact, I don't think there's a silver bullet. It ain't that simple.

Somebody hit the nail on the head when they said this is victim-mentality.

IMHO, people who go through public education are given plenty of chances to challenge themselves and pursue opportunities. If by the end of it they choose to be slaves or to instead live in their parent's basement then it seems to me it's their own fault. You can lead a horse to the water, but you can't make em drink! So are we going to baby these sorts of people to make them more proactive or punish the people who pursue a better life, all to satisfy our warped sense of reality?
edit on 26-11-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 03:35 PM
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Realtruth
Here we go again with the victim mentality again,


Again ... again?

I'm going to assume it was an off day,
and ignore that, as I am used to much
better quality from Realtruth.



Realtruth
but I do understand what the OP is saying.

Just because a child is in a public or private educational system doesn't mean they are going to come out like little obedient robots.

There is nothing wrong with the educational system if the parents DO THEIR job to instill the critical thinking skills outside the school curriculum.

If children are taught in this particular way, and they have the ability to critically think as they are attending they come out empowered, and now they have the best of both worlds.

No matter what type of system is set up people will always see it as indoctrination, which is true to a certain extent, but we do have the ability to point out to our children the fallacy's that exist in the world. It's up to them to take those tools and decide for themselves.



Didn't look at the link and see the testimony of an eye witness,
did we.

Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work

JEAN ANYON This essay first appeared in Journal of Education, Vol. 162, no. 1, Fall 1980.

University of chicago . edu
cuip.uchicago.edu...


Here, I'll do the heavy lifting and post a relevant paragraph.



In both working-class schools, work in language arts is mechanics of punctuation (commas, periods, question marks, exclamation points), capitalization, and the four kinds of sentences. One teacher explained to me, "Simple punctuation is all they'll ever use." Regarding punctuation, either a teacher or a ditto stated the rules for where, for example, to put commas. The investigator heard no classroom discussion of the aural context of punctuation (which, of course, is what gives each mark its meaning). Nor did the investigator hear any statement or inference that placing a punctuation mark could be a decision-making process, depending, for example, on one's intended meaning. Rather, the children were told to follow the rules. Language arts did not involve creative writing. There were several writing assignments throughout the year but in each instance the children were given a ditto, and they wrote answers to questions on the sheet. For example, they wrote their "autobiography" by answering such questions as "Where were you born?" "What is your favorite animal?" on a sheet entitled "All About Me."





I can't help but notice when I compare the testimony in that paragraph,
to the quoted paragraphs by RealTruth above, that the subtlety of using
something as simple as grammar to keep people in the lower classes has
not been fully realized. Having "The best of both worlds" is a buzz phrase.








Realtruth

The one think that schools do not teach is critical thinking skills and I believe the reason for this is not because they don't want to it's because they don't actually have the time to answer all the questions.

Just like at the University level, you go in, they profess, you take notes, and really have to dig in for yourself.


Peace,

RT


The one _think_ eh?

Mike Grouchy
edit on 26-11-2013 by mikegrouchy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 03:39 PM
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When you break down the word "education" you find it means edited dictation.

Public schooling isn't necessarily putting "facts" in the first priority. I know when I had been in grade school we had an area on our report card that stated weather or not we "worked well with others" which is completely irrelevant to your capability in learning and doing work based on what you've learned.



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by Vortiki
 


Etymologically, the word "education" is derived from the Latin ēducātiō ("A breeding, a bringing up, a rearing") from ēdūcō ("I educate, I train") which is related to the homonym ēdūcō ("I lead forth, I take out; I raise up, I erect") from ē- ("from, out of") and dūcō ("I lead, I conduct").[3]
en.wikipedia.org...

At the end, you are a person living in a world filled with others. If you can´t consider anybody but yourself, you will have lots of issues upcoming.

Whatever job one does, near to every job requires working with other people, whether as a client, as a customer or as a team. Teamwork is an essential skills and when someone is lacking it at youth, that is definetely a problem to be dealt with somehow, as for majority of people, lacking basic teamwork skills might cause significant problems in the future, whether at workplace,as a boss or individually.

It is important to be able to work well individually, just as well as with others as a team.

edit on 26-11-2013 by Cabin because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by FortAnthem
 


It makes sense.... the history of our education included a definite concentration of efforts to greatly improve Education during and after WW2 because of the number of casualties that were need to re[lace the War Dead.

That carried thru the early "60's when the fresh crow of Baby Boomers started turn out of College then the demand was back to young & dumb.

THE DUMBING DOWN OF OUR EDUCATION SYSTEM.

Then a major screw up.... Nam came along and now the Crop from the Dumbing Down was the New Teachers. OOPS.



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 06:20 PM
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jonnywhite
reply to post by halfmask
 


It's a big leap to suggest our education system is not here to educate. Even if our education system is here to mobilize us and make us obedient to authority, it still must teach us core principles and give us the knowledge we need to both enact and potentially evolve the system we're dependent upon. Only in la la land would you treat every child attending public school as a servant of the state. The next Bobby or Jessica could be a famous innovator or designer or you-name-it. You'd want to enable that, not kill it. We don't live in a perfect enough world to withhold giving at least some education to everyone as insurance against the unknown.

I get the feeling people here are just wanting to do some beheading, particularly the kind which involves rich persons or persons of authority.

What's so bad about highly intelligent people or leadership types or ambitious peoples? They're who they're. There will always be different classes of workers because people aren't equal. I can't change the fact our universe produces so much diversity, so I must do what I can. I've never been angry that somebody else could be more motivated than me or smarter or better at something. Rather, I'm concerned with finding out who I am and what I'm good at and striving to improve on it.

I think people want a silver bullet to solve every problem. I don't think this is it. In fact, I don't think there's a silver bullet. It ain't that simple.

Somebody hit the nail on the head when they said this is victim-mentality.

IMHO, people who go through public education are given plenty of chances to challenge themselves and pursue opportunities. If by the end of it they choose to be slaves or to instead live in their parent's basement then it seems to me it's their own fault. You can lead a horse to the water, but you can't make em drink! So are we going to baby these sorts of people to make them more proactive or punish the people who pursue a better life, all to satisfy our warped sense of reality?
edit on 26-11-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)


education. or CONDITIONING..

if the educator is ALSO gonna brainwash you into subservience. then it would be better to have a generation of 2 without eggheads, if that would allow us to completely destroy the RICH ELites that control mankind for 1,000 years and counting.

educated in what? a system?... better to live in the stone age than under the control of some rich jerk. I will give up electricity, of it would destroy all the billionaires



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 09:48 PM
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Public school is what you make of it. You either have the inherent capacity to think critically or it's off to the slaughter to be used as fodder by those who do. Is it a prejudiced system? Certainly, but a failure to produce knowledge for you to consume does not prevent your consumption of knowledge. Plenty of writing and research assignments at a university level allow discretionary latitude regarding not only your topic, but the sources from which you draw upon to validate your position or hypothesis. The same is true at an elementary level, yes the system could do more to make the instructions less general and vague, but given already burdened classroom sizes, schools would greatly struggle to pander to all the interests of the students. So they present only the most secular of knowledge for students to consume in an attempt to give them the most basic of tools required to be a productive member of society. That does not prevent the individual from aspiring towards greater things using their innate talents.



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Ahhh...metal shop. Or as we called it in the mid-80's, 'How to make your own hunting knife'. (From a file).

It was, honestly, good stuff to know...how to safely use tools and such. They don't even have shop classes at the local high school here.



posted on Nov, 26 2013 @ 10:34 PM
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There is a lot of this and that in the following quote.
I have colored them for easy viewing.


DerbyGawker
Public school is what you make of it. You either have the inherent capacity to think critically or it's off to the slaughter to be used as fodder by those who do. Is it a prejudiced system? Certainly, but a failure to produce knowledge for you to consume does not prevent your consumption of knowledge. Plenty of writing and research assignments at a university level allow discretionary latitude regarding not only your topic, but the sources from which you draw upon to validate your position or hypothesis. The same is true at an elementary level, yes the system could do more to make the instructions less general and vague, but given already burdened classroom sizes, schools would greatly struggle to pander to all the interests of the students. So they present only the most secular of knowledge for students to consume in an attempt to give them the most basic of tools required to be a productive member of society. That does not prevent the individual from aspiring towards greater things using their innate talents.


Public school is what you make of it,
just like life is. And if one makes
life out to mean that the poor deserve
to suffer because they are dumb, or
lack the will, and that the type of
rote conditioning, that was designed
to kill their creativity, called school
has nothing to do with it, then we
disagree.





Myself, I always liked the saying that
poverty is evidence of corruption in
high places.

Just how did the schools get over
crowded, when the taxes kept going
up?

Why did we wind up with one cop
alone in a squad car, when they used
to travel in pairs?

And since when did Doctors let
politicians anywhere near the
processes of diagnosis, prognosis,
treatment, and follow up?

Where did the honorable senator
study their medicine?

Mike Grouchy




edit on 26-11-2013 by mikegrouchy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2013 @ 12:30 AM
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mikegrouchy
There is a lot of this and that in the following quote.
I have colored them for easy viewing.


I'm confused as to your point.

However, regarding creativity. I don't believe as if my creativity has been stifled by public education. To quite the contrary, I believe a few select educators in my life have nourished it. While there is a growing trend of schools reducing creative classes such as art, music, and theater, this does not mean there is a deliberate attempt to stifle creativity. One must ask when funds are limited, what is more important for a child's future? Theater or reading? Mathematics or music? While the two could be incorporated, the introduction of additional requisite materials and time increase the costs, so you learn to read so you can understand theater as a later elective, similar for math and music. I believe it's quite the opposite, what good is creativity without the fundamentals to apply it? Certainly not everyone is creative, it isn't that it's suppressed.

I would agree regarding poverty and corruption, but I disagree that it is entirely 'elite, privately schooled' individuals who climb the social ranks because of their education. I believe they just have a natural affinity for self-preservation unlike individuals who enter into public school. The social atmosphere of community in public school drives individuals to regard their community as it's reflective of themselves.



posted on Nov, 27 2013 @ 12:55 AM
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DerbyGawker

mikegrouchy
There is a lot of this and that in the following quote.
I have colored them for easy viewing.


I'm confused as to your point.

However, regarding creativity. I don't believe as if my creativity has been stifled by public education. To quite the contrary, I believe a few select educators in my life have nourished it. While there is a growing trend of schools reducing creative classes such as art, music, and theater, this does not mean there is a deliberate attempt to stifle creativity. One must ask when funds are limited, what is more important for a child's future? Theater or reading? Mathematics or music? While the two could be incorporated, the introduction of additional requisite materials and time increase the costs, so you learn to read so you can understand theater as a later elective, similar for math and music. I believe it's quite the opposite, what good is creativity without the fundamentals to apply it? Certainly not everyone is creative, it isn't that it's suppressed.






posted on Nov, 27 2013 @ 01:03 AM
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Everyone should feel re-assured by the fact that the top 1% will always feed off the bottom 99%....

Even in a Robot labored Economy!!

They need people for the Robots to beat up....



posted on Nov, 27 2013 @ 03:27 AM
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BobM88
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Ahhh...metal shop. Or as we called it in the mid-80's, 'How to make your own hunting knife'. (From a file).

It was, honestly, good stuff to know...how to safely use tools and such. They don't even have shop classes at the local high school here.

The big thing as I recall at the time were throwing stars from the sheet metal. Those were fun too. With a little work they would even hold a point and edge to stick in a sturdy interior wall.


Those were the days... What a different time.



posted on Nov, 27 2013 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Ha-ha!! shop course made throwing stars and pencils would occasionally be found stuck into a suspended ceiling panel in the boys' room at my Jr. High...



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