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First prosecutor JAILED for convicting innocent man

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posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 12:10 PM
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For the first time ever, according to legal experts focused on the subject, a prosecutor who deliberately sent an innocent man to prison by withholding evidence is himself going to be jailed.


I really wonder just how many innocent people are currently incarcerated because of a prosecutor's misconduct... and I really find it amazing that charges were pursued against the prosecutor in the first place.



More than two decades after the Texas trial that sent an innocent man to prison for what would have been the rest of his life, the ex-prosecutor who led the effort is finally spending time behind bars. After pleading guilty to intentionally failing to disclose all the facts in the case, Anderson is set to be punished for “criminal contempt.” Critics say the “punishment” — 10 days in jail, 500 hours of community service, a small fine, and the loss of his law license — amounts to little more than a slap on the wrist considering the severity of the crimes. However, despite the mild consequences, lawyers working to secure justice nonetheless celebrated the historic decision to hold an official responsible. According to court documents and the Innocence Project, which works to free prisoners whom it believes have been wrongfully incarcerated, Anderson withheld crucial evidence in the case that almost certainly would have set Morton free if it had been presented. Among the most important facts that the ex-prosecutor failed to disclose: Statements from the only eyewitness to the murder saying that Morton was not the culprit.


I do agree that the punishment is a mere slap on the wrist, however, it is a start in the correct direction. It is high time that we hold our "public servants" accountable for their indiscretions... even if we have to start from the bottom up...

Source: First Prosecutor Jailed for Deliberately Convicting Innocent Man




posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 12:26 PM
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Like you said it is a start. But not nearly enough! He should be required to do the time that he made the guy do. Especially since he obviously knew he was convicting the wrong person!



posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by madmac5150
 


I think the guy should be barred from practicing law! To hold back evidence that proves the defendant is not guilty, is clearly criminal conduct and goes against the rights of the accused. If they stripped this lawyer from practicing law, maybe it would send a message to other prosecutors to think twice before engaging in holding back evidence.

If I recall, there was an attorney that was fired in the Travon Martin case because he brought attention to the courts that the lead prosecutor deleted criminal evidence about Travon Martin that would have helped George Zimmerman's case. The attorney that was doing his job was fired by the state attorney. You have to wonder if the State Attorney was upset that their push for a guilty verdict was far more important in gaining public support against George Zimmerman, than turning over evidence that could have swayed public opinion against Travon Martin.



posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 01:21 PM
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Considering the vast number or reported prosecutorial abuse, this is a reason to have hope that these people may start to get charged for their crimes.

There is not nearly enough balance in our justice system.



posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 01:24 PM
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Whoever gave him 10 days jail is'nt much better...imho
i would also say that this bastard has done this before and i hope all his convictions are being scrutinised.
Makes my blood boil



posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by madmac5150
 


Jail or even prison is not enough.
The people who agree to safeguard us and our laws should be held to higher standards.
And to take someone's rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness intentionally...
I think a rope and a tree would be just the right fit. Nothing less.



posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 02:09 PM
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reply to post by madmac5150
 


If this doesn't show the sheeple the Justice System is corrupt then I don't know what will



posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 02:23 PM
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Prosecutorial abuse is nothing new, and it's been caught many times, though not as often as it should have been. Is it a case of a "thin blue line"? Or is it a case of so many cases to look at, you can't possibly catch it all? Probably a combination of the two.

Any is too many. In this case, it seems to be misconduct. Are all such cases where an innocent is sent to jail misconduct? I doubt it.

New evidence surfaces. Witness'es recant. No misconduct there, honest mistakes, or misconduct on the part of someone else, not the prosecutor.

Every case should be judged on its own merit, or lack there of... The whole system corrupt? No. Problems? Yes. ...and no problem is unsolvable.

There needs to be oversight of the system by outsiders. ...and by outsiders I don't mean political appointees, all of whom have masters to serve.

A citizen advisory council in each municipality. One answerable to no one, save the state attorney generals office.

I don't know that this would solve the problem entirely, but it would certainly help.



posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by seagull
 


I am sure there are plenty of innocents behind bars without this sort of misconduct... sometimes crap just happens. The sad thing, however, is that in this case the PROSECUTOR decided that this man was guilty and manipulated the evidence to ensure a conviction.

I also agree that his sentence is an egregious slap on the wrist... but it is a start...



posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 04:58 PM
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