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Surprising Recent Discoveries of Three Large Near-Earth Objects

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posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:44 AM
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NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office
November 5, 2013
Two surprisingly large Near-Earth Asteroids have been discovered in just the last week or so, as well as a third moderately large asteroid which surprisingly has also gone undetected until now, even though it can pass close enough to the Earth to be classified as "potentially hazardous". Not since 1983 has any near-Earth asteroid been found as large as the approximately 20-kilometer (12-mile) size of the two new large ones. In fact, there are only three other known near-Earth asteroids that are of comparable size or larger than the two new large ones.


neo.jpl.nasa.gov...

1 - Asteroid 2013 UQ4 - 19 Km wide !!!


2 - Comet C/2013 US10 (Catalina) - 20 Km in Size ??? (yet to confirm) - ssd.jpl.nasa.gov...

3 - Asteroid 2013 UP8 - 2 Km wide - This one can approach quite close to the Earth's orbit, within 5.5 million kilometers (3.4 million miles), which makes it a "potentially hazardous asteroid"


edit on 22-11-2013 by CosmicDude because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:46 AM
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Those Orbital paths look awful...

Something has to have been protecting us thus far....
edit on 22-11-2013 by AbleEndangered because: addition



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:46 AM
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DOOM ON! Love it when something new is discovered and just kinda sneaks up on us. Not a whole lot we can do about these things other than watch.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:49 AM
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Forgive me if this sounds stupid, astronomy is not a field I'm strong in!

If they can detect the orbit, and see that it is obviously not aimed right at earth, why the "potentially hazardous" rating?



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:50 AM
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We're all DOOMED...................DOOMED I tell ya.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


Well, I`m not an expert either but I guess it takes a little change in its orbit to make it Earth directed.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


Any body that crosses the earth's orbit within 2-3 Earth-Moon distances is potentially hazardous. The most threatening thing is time. If you look far enough out, everything near Earth's orbit is a collision within some statistical probability.

So far the coast is clear out to Apophis in 2029 and more threatening in 2036.

It's interesting to me that the threat of an asteroid impact was not in the popular imagination until the movie "Deep Impact" came out. It would be ironic if the Earth was saved by a Sci-fi movie wouldn't it?



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 10:27 AM
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reply to post by InverseLookingGlass
 


What about this one ? - Asteroid 2002 NT7



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 10:58 AM
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reply to post by CosmicDude
 


A preliminary orbit suggests that 2002 NT7 is on an impact course with Earth and could strike the planet on February 1, 2019 although the uncertainties are HUGE. Astronomers have given the object a rating on the so called Palermo technical scale of threat of 0.06, making NT7 the first object to be given a positive value.

From its brightness, astronomers estimate it is about two kilometres wide, large enough to cause continent-wide devastation on Earth.

Astronomers say the object definitely merits attention, they expect more observations to show it is not on an Earth intersecting trajectory. This asteroid has now become the most threatening object in the short history of asteroid detection. It was first seen on the night of July 5, picked up by the Linear Observatory's automated sky survey programme in New Mexico.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


Not an expert here either but...

Apparently those orbits are not very stable, therefore not very predictable in the long term.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 11:07 AM
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reply to post by C21H30O2I
 


Yep, 2 Km wide is BIG, very BIG !



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by CosmicDude
 


Yep! Potentially, devastating.. I'm sure they'll be keeping a close watch. I'm no expert, but I think we're clear.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by CosmicDude
 


Even if they don't strike Earth, their orbit seems awfully close to ours.

Millions of miles away is all well and good...but they have to cross and go through the asteroid belt...a 20km asteroid has the potential to create havok as it transits through the belt, if it dislodges some of the asteroids from the belt, there's a real danger some might be knocked right into us.

How could these have been missed though?

I'm sure i saw a NASA spokesperson claiming they had discovered all of the large NEO's that might be dangerous to us, and that only the small stuff was unknown.

IOW, take what the experts say with a pinch of salt, they obviously don't know.


edit on 22-11-2013 by MysterX because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 11:46 AM
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reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


Because there's a lot of margin for error when they first start watching an object. The longer they can observe it, the smaller the margin of error. So when they first find something, like this, there's a huge margin of error they're looking at. So it's considered hazardous if it comes near earth. Give them a few weeks to narrow the orbit down.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by MysterX
 

Yep, Many things that are not expected can happen



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 03:35 PM
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CosmicDude
reply to post by MojaveBurning
 


Well, I`m not an expert either but I guess it takes a little change in its orbit to make it Earth directed.


I am no expert either but have been watching the effects of huge solar flares on the comets and to be honest one hit to one of these can cause the orbits of these to shift. That is why we should care and watch them closely.

The Bot



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 04:14 PM
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MojaveBurning
Forgive me if this sounds stupid, astronomy is not a field I'm strong in!

If they can detect the orbit, and see that it is obviously not aimed right at earth, why the "potentially hazardous" rating?


Orbits can change over time especially if they are not stable like the planets or comets. All bodies in space are subject to encounters with other objects that can subtly change their orbit, even without hitting them. And because of the nature of an orbit many objects never cross completely another objects path.


Some are like a car on the train tracks if the trains is due at 5:00 p.m. you are safe on the tracks both before and after, but if you are on those tracks at precisely 5 WHAM!
edit on 22-11-2013 by abeverage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 04:20 PM
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EnigmaAgent
We're all DOOMED...................DOOMED I tell ya.


Not if you allow me to Borrow your space craft for a bit!



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 06:46 PM
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AbleEndangered
Something has to have been protecting us thus far...


They're called the Sun, the Moon, and Jupiter.

The Sun takes in the most of the stuff that makes its way inward. Jupiter does a fair share as well, cleaning up the outer reaches. And have you looked at the far side of the Moon? Lots of objects it has saved us from!



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 06:52 PM
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EnigmaAgent
We're all DOOMED...................DOOMED I tell ya.

Well, we've had a good run. Lots of fightin' and lovin' and choppin' down trees and stuff.

Sure will look cool, though, when it comes sailing across the sky all bright and blazing and then superheats the atmosphere into a huge shockwave that flattens half the planet and then fills up the sky with clouds until everything dies.

KAH-BOOOOM!!



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