Incredible `Time Machine` - link to the 1600s!

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posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 08:46 AM
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Okay, some of you may know about this, but dont spoil it for those who do not.

I have come across a photo of one of the earliest born people to ever be photographed.
Conrad Heyer was born in 1749, and was 103 when he was photographed in 1852.
Ps this is verified on record too, so it is not hearsay.

This man lived to see the industrial revolution, French revolution, the war of 1812, the Napoleonic wars, a year without summer, the invention of the telegraph, railroad, steamboat, he even saw George Washington with his own eyes when he fought for him during the war!





Now if you think about it, born in the first half of the 1700s, he without doubt met many people who were born in the 1600s (middle aged people/ elderly people over 50 would have been alive and well in 1749).

Can you imagine? this guy actually met, and spoke to in living breathing colour (at the time) people from the 1600s!

Now if you times the amount of time that we are looking back, through the first hand experiences of this man, by just over four times, thats the time when the whole christ story happened no?

My point is, does this not show how when we look back at something happening say 1000 or 2000 years as `myths from the past`.. it really was not that long ago in the tide of times, in fact it was almost like yesturday, with the billions of years that the universe has been around.

Take for example the WW2, remember when all the footage used to be grainy black and white, and now that there is so much colour and even hd remastered footage, these people become real life, real people not grainy images from yestur-year.

I still cant get over the fact that he knew people who were alive during the same century Shakespeare and Cromwell died, and in the case of Cromwell, who did not die till 1658, those people probably did see him. Just goes to show you how when you look back at things in a time line, suddenly time does not seem all that far away does it.

edit on 22-11-2013 by mlifeoutthere because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:01 AM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


Agreed! awesome post! I think our perception of the rate of passage of time is compounded within our conciouss experience. By which i mean that our perception of time is much more stretched than maybe the actual passage of time.........

Yet again what is time other than the percieved change in the progression of events in the timeline of a conciouss being? we think of time as a thing that ticks, that moves, seperately from what we are, but imo time and it's passage is a product of physical observations within our own life lending no certainty to its own actual "exsistance"



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:09 AM
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Yup, I spoke with family about this recently. I used 50yrs as a standard for each person, 2 per century. 1000yrs 20 generations. Not so long ago if you think about it.
edit on 2-9-2010 by SPYvsSPY because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:21 AM
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Ow, i thought more people would like this



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:33 AM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


I liked your post! It was a very interesting addition to my friday morning. Thanks.
I am sure more people will enjoy it as well but they may be at work or in school. Just wait for them to get home.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:35 AM
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I find this topic rather fascinating myself. I gave you a star for connecting the dots to people passing down stories from generation to generation. You hit the nail on the head. A story from 1,000 years ago only has to traverse the lips of a handful of people before it gets to today.

I lend a lot of credence to local legends and think there is some truth in a lot of them.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


In another fifty years or so you'll be meeting people who could remember the world before the internet, lol.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 10:50 AM
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mlifeoutthere
Okay, some of you may know about this, but dont spoil it for those who do not.

I have come across a photo of one of the earliest born people to ever be photographed.
Conrad Heyer was born in 1749, and was 103 when he was photographed in 1852.
Ps this is verified on record too, so it is not hearsay.

This man lived to see the industrial revolution, French revolution, the war of 1812, the Napoleonic wars, a year without summer, the invention of the telegraph, railroad, steamboat, he even saw George Washington with his own eyes when he fought for him during the war!





Now if you think about it, born in the first half of the 1700s, he without doubt met many people who were born in the 1600s (middle aged people/ elderly people over 50 would have been alive and well in 1749).

Can you imagine? this guy actually met, and spoke to in living breathing colour (at the time) people from the 1600s!

Now if you times the amount of time that we are looking back, through the first hand experiences of this man, by just over four times, thats the time when the whole christ story happened no?

My point is, does this not show how when we look back at something happening say 1000 or 2000 years as `myths from the past`.. it really was not that long ago in the tide of times, in fact it was almost like yesturday, with the billions of years that the universe has been around.

Take for example the WW2, remember when all the footage used to be grainy black and white, and now that there is so much colour and even hd remastered footage, these people become real life, real people not grainy images from yestur-year.

I still cant get over the fact that he knew people who were alive during the same century Shakespeare and Cromwell died, and in the case of Cromwell, who did not die till 1658, those people probably did see him. Just goes to show you how when you look back at things in a time line, suddenly time does not seem all that far away does it.

edit on 22-11-2013 by mlifeoutthere because: (no reason given)


Good thread OP. puts span of time and transfer of knowledge in better perspective. So we have transfer of information from one era to another to another over a 200 year period. And if this has happens sufficiently then the transfer of information and knowledge spans 500 or even a 1000 years. Making myths less like myths!!



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 12:41 PM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


As a very young man myself ,I moved to Calgary Alberta in 1970 ...I was invited to watch the Stampede parade from a 16 ave. balcony in a office building ....The guy that had invited me was quite old and he told me that his sister was the first white woman in Calgary ....I am 60 at this time but yea time has a way of making us think that that was a forever ago ...



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 12:48 PM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


I've often thought along the same lines, how a thousand years is only 14 or so lives of 70 years apiece. And the people in the states have a harder time of visualizing long stretches of time as the country is so young in comparison to nations in other parts of the world. India has socks older than the United States.
edit on 22-11-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


I am always fascinated by how 'compacted' events and personalities seem when you begin to study history.

Perhaps you (or someone else) could produce a timeline chart to show how historic lives overlapped?

One thing that people do not consider is how the longevity of documents can affect our understanding of history.

For instance, the scrolls of the Jewish people were made of fine leather and were usually handled with instruments rather than touched with human hands. This gave a useable length of life of around 800 years per scroll before they were discarded. So, from Moses time (1271 BCE according to Rabbinical calculation) to the Dead Sea Scrolls (the scroll ages average to 363 BCE) only requires one copy from the original and, to today, only four copies from the original scrolls would be required!

This leaves little time for reinterpretation and modifications to the text (an oft quoted fallacy on ATS).



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 01:28 PM
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chr0naut
reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


I am always fascinated by how 'compacted' events and personalities seem when you begin to study history.

Perhaps you (or someone else) could produce a timeline chart to show how historic lives overlapped?

One thing that people do not consider is how the longevity of documents can affect our understanding of history.

For instance, the scrolls of the Jewish people were made of fine leather and were usually handled with instruments rather than touched with human hands. This gave a useable length of life of around 800 years per scroll before they were discarded. So, from Moses time (1271 BCE according to Rabbinical calculation) to the Dead Sea Scrolls (the scroll ages average to 363 BCE) only requires one copy from the original and, to today, only four copies from the original scrolls would be required!

This leaves little time for reinterpretation and modifications to the text (an oft quoted fallacy on ATS).



Yeh i would do ANYTHING, and i mean ANYTHING, to have a time machine and be safely watching from inside a safe bullet proof box, such things like the fall of the dinosaurs, or if there really was a jewish temple, or `moses splitting the sea` and other things... i mean for me, that would be the ultimate holy grail the most incredible thing that could ever happen to me... far more than sex or riches etc.. im far more interested with the past, our origins, etc.. and it isnt a case of lingering in the past, its a case of how can we move on when we know so little about the past.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


I had a history teacher that would put things in that perspective.

He would ask How old our oldest relative was.

He would proceed to tell us what that relative lived through and what people they directly knew went through.

His point being history wasn't some ancient irrelevant thing, it was what happens every day around us and to us, that even students now where directly connected to the subjects he was teaching.

One of the best teachers I ever had.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 03:57 PM
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benrl
reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


I had a history teacher that would put things in that perspective.

He would ask How old our oldest relative was.

He would proceed to tell us what that relative lived through and what people they directly knew went through.

His point being history wasn't some ancient irrelevant thing, it was what happens every day around us and to us, that even students now where directly connected to the subjects he was teaching.

One of the best teachers I ever had.


Exactly, its weird how i cant imagine how i lived without cellphones, but then ... most little kids today will be astounded that 15 years ago, vhs recorders were more common than internet
edit on 22-11-2013 by mlifeoutthere because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


Yea, when I was much younger, I thought about how my grand father had read in the newspaper about the Wright brothers first flight. He was still around when men landed on the moon (or not). He had seen action in WWI and WWII. He tried to go to Korea but was too old.
My point being, the things which happened within his life time were kind of radical as life times go.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


I have thought about this fact many times. I am in my 50's not considered old now days, my Grandmother came in a covered wagon with her family from Missouri to New mexico as a child. Crazy!



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 06:36 PM
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teamcommander
reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


Yea, when I was much younger, I thought about how my grand father had read in the newspaper about the Wright brothers first flight. He was still around when men landed on the moon (or not). He had seen action in WWI and WWII. He tried to go to Korea but was too old.
My point being, the things which happened within his life time were kind of radical as life times go.


Most people you talk to today think humans have accomplished much over a long long time, but NO they have only started to change at all, it was all the same for so many of the years mankind has struggled here. People should be able to see something is just wrong with the advances made during my lifetime, it is just too fast. They say it was because of the world war but there has always been wars, I think we have been introduced to alien tech.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 06:46 PM
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I'm already feeling like a time link sometimes. I remember seeing the JFK funeral on TV. It was quite the thing, and wasn't all that long ago. But now here it is... ancient history.

And I lived for quite some time without a computer. It's an interesting gadget.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 06:53 PM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


what a fantastically, mind-boggling, funny and interesting post! Thank ya kindly for the thought-itching =)



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by mlifeoutthere
 


Collective conscious stream... Just explaining this to my children a couple days ago... luckily we have longevity in our family so it was pretty easy to jump for us. Reality is a beautiful thing. I have fun with these types of things too, last one was asking tons of people just a few short years ago what number comes after a trillion, a thread here somewhere, but yes, we all leap at the same pace...





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