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CERN test magnet reaches 13.5 tesla

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posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 07:49 PM
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home.web.cern.ch...

There it is, a new CERN record for a test magnet of 13.5 tesla.


The Short Model Coil (SMC) programme tests new magnet technologies with magnets about 30 centimetres long. The technology developed in the SMC will eventually help engineers build more powerful magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and future accelerators.

Currently, the LHC uses niobium-titanium superconducting magnets to both bend and focus proton beams as they race around the LHC. But these magnets are not powerful enough to support stronger focusing and higher energies. So engineers are looking into a new superconducting material, niobium tin.


I have no idea what it means, although the page says it should eventually greatly multiply the number of collisions and recorded collisions at the Collider.
edit on 18-11-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 07:54 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


Black Hole!! Buckle your Seat Belts>>>>>



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by C1assified
 


If a black hole did open up at CERN, the stuff sci fi and spooky doom pron folk love, it would only last for the briefest time imaginable and so would endanger nothing. At least I think that's what I've read. If I'm wrong, run away......run away......!!!



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:04 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 




If a black hole did open up at CERN, the stuff sci fi and spooky doom pron folk love, it would only last for the briefest time imaginable and so would endanger nothing.


That's what all scientists say when they're experimenting with potentially dangerous materials. Don't get me wrong I think CERN is way cool but I doubt it's completely safe or under their control.

Just my opinion though as I'm not a scientist. Still most people don't get up in the morning and say "Hey, let's make a black hole, it should only last a few micro-seconds."

What could go wrong?



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


No! Your Right.

The Problem is??? We don't know what could happen when we mess around with particles,
Even though they seem small to us they ar'nt that small, when you compare them to the over all picture.
Take our solar system for an example!! Seems big to us, But it really isnt? compared to the universe.
And then compare our universe to WHAT may be out there.

We could be destroying Universes. in turn causing our own destruction.
I Don't know Just seems That it could be bad You Never know.



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by Bassago
 


Your Right, No one wakes up thinking about doing the wrong thing. I just think thing are a lot bigger then you may think.....



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:10 PM
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13.5 Tesla's you say?

Isn't it 13.5 Suppressla's ?? I thought everything that man did was wiped off the face of the planet. Interesting to have a unit of measurement named after him…






Just my opinion though as I'm not a scientist. Still most people don't get up in the morning and say "Hey, let's make a black hole, it should only last a few micro-seconds."


I do that every morning after my coffee, right before I hit the shower.
edit on 18-11-2013 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:11 PM
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C1assified
reply to post by Aleister
 


Black Hole!! Buckle your Seat Belts>>>>>


Careful now...you sound like the people that were worried that Columbus was going to sail right off the edge of the Earth!



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


I think it works out to be something like 14,000,000,000 deg. Not sure. will have to look it up.



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:15 PM
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Aleister
home.web.cern.ch...

There it is, a new CERN record for a test magnet of 13.5 tesla.



Not really, they are just talking about future developments at Cern:


The present world record for niobium-tin magnets in dipole configuration is 16.1 tesla, held by an American research group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The most recent CERN-built SMC, using a cable with a geometry very close to that of the 11 tesla dipoles presently under development, reached 13.5 tesla. "We still have a long way to go," says Perez. "But the SMC project is a first and encouraging step in the right direction."


Current record is held by Lawrence Berkeley (as per your source).



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by C1assified

Take our solar system for an example!! Seems big to us, But it really isnt? compared to the universe.
And then compare our universe to WHAT may be out there.

We could be destroying Universes. in turn causing our own destruction.
I Don't know Just seems That it could be bad You Never know.

 


That logic doesn't really jive, since blowing up a planet doesn't blow up the universe.



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by superman2012
 


Trying to think out side the box!! only because the people that are doing the tests And running them have to think out side the box Also.


But Really, i don't think anything is or will happen other then what they are trying to achieve.



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


Blowing up Universes, Not planets.. Then thinking Every thing is connected.. And I Mean AND I Have Had a few beers,



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:21 PM
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There is no way they could create a dangerous black hole. Black holes may hole galaxies together. They are massive.

Any hole they create will be very, very small and will not have enough mass to sustain itself but for the briefest time.

Unless of course these people have no clue as to what they're doing, but I'm pretty sure they do.



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


We Are living in the Best times EH!

There seems to be a lot going on and it is all great....
edit on C1pm333325f25America/Chicago18 by C1assified because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


How it's worded it says it's a record for CERN, not a world record. And like I said, I have no idea what it means or what a Tesla is. It just sounded like something which people here would like, and I'd like to learn more about.
edit on 18-11-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 09:36 PM
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Aleister
I have no idea what it means


Thank you for your important, personal contribution on a topic that you know nothing about.



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 09:56 PM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


Tesla (unit)



The tesla (symbol T) is the SI derived unit of magnetic field strength or magnetic flux density, commonly denoted as B. One tesla is equal to one weber per square metre, and it was defined in 1960[1] in honour of Nikola Tesla. The strongest fields encountered from permanent magnets are from Halbach spheres which can be over 4.5 T.[2]

The unit was announced during the Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures in 1960.


Weber (unit)



The weber may be defined in terms of Faraday's law, which relates a changing magnetic flux through a loop to the electric field around the loop. A change in flux of one weber per second will induce an electromotive force of one volt (produce an electric potential difference of one volt across two open-circuited terminals).


Volt



A single volt is defined as the difference in electric potential across a wire when an electric current of one ampere dissipates one watt of power.
edit on 18-11-2013 by Swills because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 10:07 PM
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Aleister
reply to post by boncho
 


How it's worded it says it's a record for CERN, not a world record. And like I said, I have no idea what it means or what a Tesla is. It just sounded like something which people here would like, and I'd like to learn more about.


Tesla in this context is the SI unit of magnetic flux density. So basically, it's how strong the magnetic field is that these magnets can put out.

You use them in this case to focus the particle flow. The particles are moving SO fast that you have to have a whopper field to move them sufficiently in the space you've got. So really strong magnets with really uniform (or at least predictable) fields are necessary.



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 10:28 PM
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It is quite impressive.

Before making throw away statements regarding CERN maybe a little bit of research might help.
"I don't know what they are doing there but Im sure they are not in control" is the most logically insane statement.

Fact is that cosmic ray protons smack into the upper atmosphere at energies that we particle physicists dream of. Particle physics got started in the atmosphere with emulsion plates sent up on balloons and there is a push in the community to return to this, to probe the energy frontiers from space. This is what the AMS project is doing.





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