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Travois Or Ways To Carry Heavy Loads On The Move

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posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 10:23 AM
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When I think about bugging out and how much water I want to take initially, weight becomes a big issue. So, I welcome ideas in finding different ways to lighten, carry or drag loads for humans and animals alike.

I found this travois design that I think would work well and, so, wanted to share. It also converts to a camp chair and sleeping cot. I think using canvas eliminates the use of additional heavy wood, thereby allowing more weight to be taken along. Travoi still allow you to wear a backpack.

Although, I would alter the design by adding another piece of wood, to be positioned in front of my waist so that I could grab onto it with both hands and drag the load using a pushing motion with my entire body, rather than holding the two pieces of wood on the side with my hands, which would entail using my upper body to a greater extent.

If anyone has any better ideas, please share.





posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


When I camp,carrying water is a sin when I am surrounded by lakes and rivers.
I boil what I need when I need it.
I take one full bottle for the hike in and then its what is around me.

I almost made a similar thread about this today.
The amount of weight you can carry is what you have....you can't carry an elephant.

Winter is more forgiving because I use a sled which can carry more things easily.

The easiest thing to carry is knowledge so learn while you can.....nobody should learn to survive in a real situation by reading a book about getting food while you are starving.
edit on 18-11-2013 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 10:55 AM
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Honestly I dont think you're going to "bug out" very far dragging that in any conditions, let alone heavy snow. Unless of course you train for this type of activity every day. And this guy doesnt even have a large amount of water with him.

In an emergency situation, ok. Gotta do what you gotta do. So as far a using a piece to push with your waist as opposed to pulling with hands.... I think the hand bars are useful to keep the front end of the "sled" up out of the snow or dirt or mud.

Using a push bar might not work so well for that plus you have to attach it in such a way that it doesnt keep breaking free from whatever you use to attach it to the sled.

I think something with a radius front would help keep the front end from digging in and using a variety of dragging techniques. The push bar could work but to give your waist a break perhaps a rope to drag for a bit.

Ive seen that design before from the American Indians for transporting people so it must be almost the best primitive design.

Maybe a dog sled type design, that you carry in the back of yout truck



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 11:05 AM
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Of course, using survivial bush knowledge with a young strong body when on the move is a no brainer, but what about older, weaker people that may have babies and/or very young children, and perhaps pets with them (alot of people think of their pets as family members too)? It would seem to me that the travois could also be used to drag young children or infirm people in addition to supplies, as well as a travois could be harnessed to a dog (everyone needs to pull their weight LOL).

Also, I would think that during an emergency bug out situation people would be heading out of the cities into rural areas, or the bush and not really know when or if they will happen upon a water source, or where they are going.

That's another question I have - let's say you planned your bug out location, then found you could not go there?



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 12:01 PM
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This may be another option for dragging a heavy load, but I can't off the top of my head see what other uses the sled would have .... go to 2.08 point in video.




posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


I don't think many realize what a workout pulling one of those is.

In a "bug out" situation the average person would probably have trouble carrying a 30 lb pack much less pulling a travois for any significant distance.

The best thing you can do to prepare for a bug out situation is lose weight. Lose weight and make sure you can handle a pack of 30-40 lbs at the least. Learn to boil water and make makeshift pressure cookers.

As far as what happens to people with small children and pets, dogs should be able to walk on their own. Kids can walk on their own as well. If your whole family is fat and out of shape then your best preparation is exercise and a change of diet.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 02:31 AM
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OrphanApology
reply to post by InTheLight
 


I don't think many realize what a workout pulling one of those is.

In a "bug out" situation the average person would probably have trouble carrying a 30 lb pack much less pulling a travois for any significant distance.

The best thing you can do to prepare for a bug out situation is lose weight. Lose weight and make sure you can handle a pack of 30-40 lbs at the least. Learn to boil water and make makeshift pressure cookers.

As far as what happens to people with small children and pets, dogs should be able to walk on their own. Kids can walk on their own as well. If your whole family is fat and out of shape then your best preparation is exercise and a change of diet.


In a perfect world that would work, but what about taking babies, the disabled or infirm people on the bug out? If all the able bodied weaker adults, children, and dogs pulled lighter weight travois with supplies, that would leave the stronger adults to handle the transport of the infirm or disabled. I would think dragging lighter loads to begin with would be the answer, in that, one could build up their strength slowly.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


The whole idea behind a bug out is to be prepared to leave quickly. If you aren't used to pulling one of those they get very difficult after even only a few miles.

Babies are easy, just get a front sling. Elderly could possibly go in a Travois if you really wanted to go that route but again the idea behind bug out is to leave very quickly.

If it's an obese persons etc. The best preparation is diet and exercise.



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 07:20 AM
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In practically all wilderness survival schools-like the one I will be at in January-persons are limited to a frame pack with the weight not to exceed 1/4 body weight. If you haven't the skills, and the physical ability, to not only survive but flourish,then you don't need to be in the woods at all.

It's just like mandatory hunting safety courses for boys 8-14. If you can't use any of the half dozen ways to find direction in the woods then you don't need to be there at all.

With the proper training, physical conditioning and experience anyone can survive indefinably on, as in my case, a 50lbs field frame pack.

The problem that causes almost all survival school students to give up is the huge difference between surviving and surviving comfortably.

It's not unsurprisingly common for women to be more adaptive, gritty and determined in survival situations and not succumb to the numerous psychological breakdowns that can occur.



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 07:46 AM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 



Nomadic people had been using these things for centuries. They are great for dragging meat and firewood back to camp.

Camp is the key word here. If you really think you may need to bug out one day have a camping location in mind.



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 08:04 AM
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So far, most replies don't address the problems that some people will face, in that, how to deal with the infirm, disabled and very young children that won't be able to walk, or not walk long distances.

What other alternatives are there? Stockpile lots of gas and purchase an off-roader vehicle to bug out in the bush?

If living in an off-roader is not possible, due to whatever reasons and other than dragging the disabled on a travois, what other options are there? What plans have you all made for taking along your elderly, perhaps weak, parents or disabled family members?



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 08:44 AM
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there is a book on urban survival, where you survive in an environment that you already have plenty of knowledge about. I live in a city...even destroyed buildings are better shelters when a little common sense is used. there will be a lot of man-made items that can be converted to survival tools and supplies. plumbing with left over water that can be filtered and meat (if you get desperate) from dogs, cats, birds etc...



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 08:57 AM
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jimmyx
there is a book on urban survival, where you survive in an environment that you already have plenty of knowledge about. I live in a city...even destroyed buildings are better shelters when a little common sense is used. there will be a lot of man-made items that can be converted to survival tools and supplies. plumbing with left over water that can be filtered and meat (if you get desperate) from dogs, cats, birds etc...


Yes, of course, I would stay in place if at all possible. What if you have to evacuate and take others with you?



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


Boy he sure was out of breath from that little trek he did to show how it works... Goes to show how being slim does not mean healthy. I have done outbacks with people of all statutes in the past and I have seen heavy set folks get along just fine and thin ones suffer pretty fast out on the trails. I think dragging a sled in these conditions would be better for the chap in the video rather than clumsily lugging that little load he had behind him in the example. Also his snow shoes would do much better in hard packed snow that that soggy stuff he was suffering through. Hope that backpack is filled with warm socks and extra shoes...



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


Taking only what you will need to survive...

When making a stretcher as we really call it, use things like sleeping bags, blankets even coats and jackets which can be disassembled in the night for warmth and comfort. Having one of those old military tents would be great to protect you from whatever you may face out in the wilds. you wouldn't even have to pitch if you don't want, just tuck it under and over you.

collections.infocollections.org...

(You could even stick something useful under the back legs to help it slide better... )
edit on am1130amWed, 20 Nov 2013 09:56:00 -0600 by antar because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 10:00 AM
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Thank you Antar for your posts. Yes, using materials that serve multiple purposes is the wisest move. Perhaps sewing grommets on the army tent and using that too.

If I had to bug out with very young children, disabled people, or weak elderly folks, I certainly hope I have many different able bodied people in a tribe/troup situation, so everyone could take turns pulling whoever or whatever needs pulling.

Maybe that should be a consideration at the outset of a bug out, to organize a troup/tribe, then more supplies could be brought along instead of hoping to find water and/or food along the way.



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 10:21 AM
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Here's an interesting twist on constructing a travois (or stretcher) using jackets and/or extra clothing that has to be brought along anyway. I hope the buttons and zippers hold out.





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