Is this a possible meteorite?

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posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 05:25 PM
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We found this rock on our ranch. The surface makes me think it could possibly be a meteorite. It does not appear to be metallic nor magnetic. It weighs almost 8 pounds.

Here it is from two different angles.

If it's not a meteorite, what would have cause the tiny craters?






posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 


Looks like rub marks. Possibly something Native Americans used for something. They did a lot of twisting of things to make holes and other things. could have been a firestone also.

Could also have been a stone that was used for setting iron stakes or even hammering old nails hundreds of years ago.
edit on 17-11-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 


I'm a Meteorite Dealer and I can say 100% it is NOT a Meteorite.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 05:40 PM
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RocksFromSpace
reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 


I'm a Meteorite Dealer and I can say 100% it is NOT a Meteorite.


That's a really neat profession. I'll bet there are not that many of you out there.

Could you post a few pics of some meteorites that you've found or come across?

Don't want to derail this thread, but it is relevant to the OP.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 05:43 PM
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The rock does have heavy Iron content with that Rust and oxidation on the edges.

How many Rocks Rust??

I bet it is heavy too...

Don't rule out meteorite just yet.

They have been falling all over..

Question:
Does a magnet stick to it??
edit on 17-11-2013 by AbleEndangered because: addition



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 05:50 PM
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It's weathered Granite



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 05:53 PM
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reply to post by AbleEndangered
 


A magnet will also stick to Hematite, Magnetite, limonite...all of which are a types of Iron Ore, so that is not a positive meteorite detector but a starting point.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by Riffrafter
 


I don't know the rules on posting links but if you Google "Meteorites Plus" you can visit my web site and see a lot of photos.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 05:58 PM
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AbleEndangered
I bet it is heavy too...
Question:
Does a magnet stick to it??
edit on 17-11-2013 by AbleEndangered because: addition


It's nearly 8 pounds.
No, magnet does not stick to it.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 06:25 PM
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RocksFromSpace
reply to post by Riffrafter
 


I don't know the rules on posting links but if you Google "Meteorites Plus" you can visit my web site and see a lot of photos.


Thanks. Great site - am still reviewing some of the pages now. In addition to some great pics you've put a lot of information out there too. Kudo's - and am jealous that you've got such an interesting business.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 
It's pumice...Source
edit on 11/17/2013 by usertwelve because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 06:37 PM
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usertwelve
reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 
It's pumus...Source


Thanks, but I think it's much too heavy and hard to be pumice.
I think the poster who mentioned granite may be correct.

I guess no granite from space then?



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 

8 lbs. is pretty light for a rock that size.

[edit] Actually, how big is that rock? No frame of reference.
edit on 11/17/2013 by usertwelve because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 06:42 PM
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Granite or metamorphic, anyway...
The "thumbprints" are manmade...on that picture...they're regmorliphs....on a meteorite and look random and "burned-in", on a real meteorite.
edit on 17-11-2013 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 06:43 PM
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I think a meteorite dealer may be worried about an influx of meteorites sinking the price of current stock??....



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 07:01 PM
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rickymouse
Could also have been a stone that was used for setting iron stakes or even hammering old nails hundreds of years ago.


This sounds very possible. It was found near the ruins of an early 1800's settlement in Colorado. Hammering of nails makes some sense.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 07:03 PM
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usertwelve
reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 

8 lbs. is pretty light for a rock that size.

[edit] Actually, how big is that rock? No frame of reference.
edit on 11/17/2013 by usertwelve because: (no reason given)


About the size of a cantaloupe. Longest length is about 7.75 inches.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 07:12 PM
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At first glance, it certainly looks like granite, and considering the size and weight, that sounds about right for a piece of granite that size (lots of it here where I live).

Meteorites are not granite. Granite forms deep in the Earth were the pressure on magma is great enough so that when it starts to cool the different minerals in it solidify in to larger pieces, giving granite it's distinct appearance.

Most meteorites that we see are not formed that way (deep in the earth under pressure).

As for the depressions in the rock, as stated before, it looks like it was used as a primitive hammer for hitting large objects.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 07:20 PM
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AnonymousCitizen

rickymouse
Could also have been a stone that was used for setting iron stakes or even hammering old nails hundreds of years ago.


This sounds very possible. It was found near the ruins of an early 1800's settlement in Colorado. Hammering of nails makes some sense.

Interesting.....I love finds like that. Every time we get a good downpour, we run out to the wooded hill behind our house, because all the old bottles, and an Indian head or some such thing will wash up. S&F 👍



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 09:50 PM
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reply to post by AnonymousCitizen
 


Here's a website that will help you. Meteor

edit on 17-11-2013 by Staroth because: (no reason given)





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