2.4 Million people in USA ready to work for $0.25 A Day Corporations hiring now!

page: 4
34
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join

posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 08:22 PM
link   

MALBOSIA

buster2010

MALBOSIA
Considering how much the rest of us have to pay for the same goods the US gets, maybe $0.25/hr wages for them will finally bring things back to par.

It shocks me to see how much I can buy in the states for so little money. I sent $700 dollars down there a few years back and ended up with 10 pairs of shoes, 20 pairs of pants, 25 shirts and t-shirts, 3 jackets (one was 250 so the rest only cost 500), 10 hats, plus socks and blah blah. That same list would cost me 10 times as much here in Canada.

Obviously I am exaggerating 25 cents bringing us back to par, but with the price of goods in the US I think you would still be living better than welfare recipients here in Canada.
edit on 16-11-2013 by MALBOSIA because: forgot about shirts


There is reason why the stuff was so cheap. It's made in China and other countries where slave labor is allowed.


The goods we have here are made in China too. We have less manufacturing
than the US, Im sure of it.

Our made in China goods seem to still be waaaaay cheaper in the states.

And the portions of food you get in the US for the price... no wonder Americans
complain about obesity.

Cost of liquore....

Cigarettes....

Way to cjeap to not end up unhealthy.


We need cheep things like that to support the booming healthcare industry though!
If it wasn't for the healthcare, war machine and criminality of America where would
we be? Economically that is!
edit on 18-11-2013 by nosacrificenofreedom because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 10:02 PM
link   
reply to post by nosacrificenofreedom
 


there is another group out there that is paid very little for their work...people who are mentally handicapped, after they graduate from school at around age 23 they go to a workshop,

in california many workshops run by HOPE, they get a special designation that allows them to pay very little to these workers....the work came from companies,when, the economy was good and they had too much work, send it over to the workshops for really cheap......it's been a while sin ce they have had any work to do,though, but this story made me think of this.

thought you all would find it interesting

I know some mentally handicapped people get jobs,but, they are higher functioning then the ones I am talking about.
edit on 18-11-2013 by research100 because: add sentence



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 10:52 PM
link   

research100
reply to post by nosacrificenofreedom
 


there is another group out there that is paid very little for their work...people who are mentally handicapped, after they graduate from school at around age 23 they go to a workshop,

in california many workshops run by HOPE, they get a special designation that allows them to pay very little to these workers....the work came from companies,when, the economy was good and they had too much work, send it over to the workshops for really cheap......it's been a while sin ce they have had any work to do,though, but this story made me think of this.

thought you all would find it interesting

I know some mentally handicapped people get jobs,but, they are higher functioning then the ones I am talking about.
edit on 18-11-2013 by research100 because: add sentence


As a kid growing up I would goto my grandparents cottage in Wisconsin every year for a couple weeks to visit. They had some neighbors at their cottage that were good people, their son was mentally handicapped though. His name is Barry. When Barry was 30 he had the mental capabilities of a 10 year old, the last time I talked to them was a decade ago and he had improved to be around that of a 13-14 year old. He works but lives at home with his parents, the state put him to work mowing grass on the side of the road. In return for this they paid him very little, I don't know the exact details but I know it wasn't enough for him to live on his own (he would need help managing his finances though even if it were). Basically he worked just to get medical assistance but couldn't actually contribute to his own upkeep.

I hadn't thought of that for a long time, but your post brought it back to the forefront of my mind. I'm all for finding work for people to do, but I strongly believe they should be fairly compensated, this applies to prison labor, menial jobs, busy work, factory work, and anything else. If it causes an increase in the price of goods then so be it. Everyone should have the opportunity to support themselves without assistance.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 12:56 AM
link   
The rich just keep on getting richer off of us! Before you know it, they will throw us all in Fema camps and work us for nothing!



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 03:10 AM
link   
Private prisons are already too profitable as it is, but they'll never be happy.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 06:34 PM
link   
reply to post by charles1952
 


Charles1952,
I apologize for taking so long to get back to you.
Not at all sure I can provide you with a level of proof or reason to satisfy your desire for understanding, although I'll give it a go.
Why folks have a problem with corporate prison industries?
-Jobs & Wages
Private employers can not compete with anyone using slaves. Slaves presented with all inclusive compensation packages including free health care, dental, vision, clothing, utilities, housing, food, transportation, security, education and counseling sponsored by their state's taxpayers. Before emancipation those exploiting the slaves and reaping the profits at least had to pay for their upkeep.

-The prevailing wages outside of the prison industries are directly effected by loss of work and competitive wages.



The graph illiterates that indeed prison occupancy levels are dropping. At that rate it should only be a few hundred years until we return to the percentages of incarcerated we had before prisons were for profit.

I think I will have the most difficulty explaining why anyone might not like lobbyist and political groups that do not disclose their connections and supporters. Would you understand that some people still believe, a government by the people and for the people; not the corporations establishing profit margins for the share holders?

American Legislative Exchange Council info

more




Efforts to Rewrite Americans' Rights; Changes that Imprison More People for Longer and Make More Money Guns, Prisons, Crime, and Immigration This page documents how bills pushed by ALEC corporations result in taxpayers subsidizing the profits of the private prison industry by putting more people in for-profit prisons and keeping them in jail for longer. The bills also would put more guns on streets and interfere with local law enforcement decisions about how best to interact with immigrant communities. Through ALEC, corporations have both a VOICE and a VOTE on specific state laws through these model bills. Do you?


Charles, I hope I have shinned enough light on the subject, to provide you with the level of clarity you desire. I hope you can understand why people may not like exploiting others whether or not they deserve it.
There are many ways to say how you treat others effects everyone.
edit on 19-11-2013 by donlashway because: s



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 06:55 PM
link   
Before hand, how on earth did anyone think that private prisons focused on making profits would ever be a good idea?

Who's paying for the inmates? Taxes? Then, shouldn't all prisons be nationalized/socialized?

Did those inmates break any laws concerning the corporations owning the prisons or concerning state and national laws?

You see my point.

You can't have private corporations capitalize basic society functions like prisons, education, medication, security and think that this will beneficial for the majority and enhance our civilization.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 07:07 PM
link   
reply to post by Aazadan
 


at the workshops they were paid per each piece they did, if there was a lot of work it would be 5 hrs a day 5 days a week, they got paid a check about 20 bucks every two weeks when they did jobs off site like pulling weeds and whatnot, they were paid more.

they get disability and state only allows so much income so the check stubs sent to the state and every few months they would lower the amount the state sent if they money they made( plus what the state sent) went over what the state allows.

but, still it saved companies a lot of money.



posted on Nov, 19 2013 @ 10:37 PM
link   
reply to post by donlashway
 

Dear donlashway,

Thank you, you've done a wonderful job and I appreciate it. You may always take all the time you want, I'm not going anywhere and I don't expect instant enlightenment.

I have to admit I was a little discouraged by your two links which had, in the upper left hand corner, the legend "ALEC EXPOSED," but I suppose everyone has a bias in this issue.


Why folks have a problem with corporate prison industries?
-Jobs & Wages
Private employers can not compete with anyone using slaves. Slaves presented with all inclusive compensation packages including free health care, dental, vision, clothing, utilities, housing, food, transportation, security, education and counseling sponsored by their state's taxpayers.
OK, I can buy that to an extent. But is it a significant effect? We've got, what, 2- 2.5 million prisoners? They can't all be working. Pick a number, maybe half of them? Maybe a million for round numbers? How does that stack up against 11 million illegals, and only the Lord knows how many Chinese and other Asians doing work for American companies for less than the "appropriate wage?"

Wouldn't those millions also have the effect of increasing unemployment and lowering wages?


The graph illiterates that indeed prison occupancy levels are dropping. At that rate it should only be a few hundred years until we return to the percentages of incarcerated we had before prisons were for profit.
I think we have a difference here. We agree that prison rates went way up. If I'm not misunderstanding you, you think it was because corporations came in, and I think the "War on Drugs" and tougher sentencing rules were a public reaction to the perceived threat of increasing crime. Maybe we can find common ground here.


I think I will have the most difficulty explaining why anyone might not like lobbyist and political groups that do not disclose their connections and supporters.
I'm a lot less excited about that now that I know the IRS will target groups and individuals on a political basis. I'm also concerned about the efforts in Wisconsin to go after individuals who supported Governor Walker by petition.


Would you understand that some people still believe, a government by the people and for the people; not the corporations establishing profit margins for the share holders?
I don't know if sentencing laws in the states are being controlled by Corrections Corp. of America, or even ALEC. CCA spent a little under a million last year, and your article says ALEC spent $87 million, but that's to support 50 think tanks. That's less than $2 million per state per year.

The group working to pass the gay marriage bill in Minnesota spent $2 million in a year, and ALEC has a lot of other issues on it's plate beside prisons. I further suspect that ALEC isn't the only organization that has asked states for tougher sentencing, or has asked for more 2nd Amendment freedom, or has weighed in on immigration issues.


Through ALEC, corporations have both a VOICE and a VOTE on specific state laws through these model bills. Do you?
Sure. Occupy Wall Street, Tea Party, Libertarians, protests in Congressmen's offices, the list is lengthy.


I hope you can understand why people may not like exploiting others whether or not they deserve it.
There are many ways to say how you treat others effects everyone.
And here we're back to full agreement, thank you.

Now, the solution to underpaid workers producing products for American workers? Have corporations give more money to prisoners, so they're paid the same as outside workers? Then why hire prisoners at all? And what do we do about illegals and Asians? I realize that's off the topic, but I think their effect is far greater than the prison workers'.

I like your heart, we may be on the path to something good here.

With respect,
Charles1952





top topics
 
34
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join