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posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 01:24 PM
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Hello ATS !

I sell tools for a living, full time so in my day I meet a whole plethora of different peoples, doing different things. Do it your self type men and women working on their homes, electricians, plumbers, contractors, construction workers, city workers, mechanics, etc etc.

A long with this I meet people of all types, races, personalities, and moods.

I treat every single person with the utmost respect and treat them like friends coming in to say hi. I try to remember names if given to me, what they do for a living, what they were working on last. Ask if things went well, are finished so on.

How ever now and then I meet people who share many of the same ideals as those of us here on the forums.

The other day I met a gentleman in with his young son looking for items for his B.O.B. I talked with him and wandered around trying to help him find the things on his list, gave him suggestions of different places to look for various items, and learned he was ex military, from Texas.

It did not occur to me once to bring up ATS until after he left! I actually work with many preppers, not that its that uncommon or anything. It got me thinking about taking a second look at preparing myself, even if minimal preparation.

How ever, I want to ask you this. Most of us, have come across ATS on our own accord. How would you react to being told about a site like this in a conversation first meeting another individual? I don't know if that is something I should drop in every day conversation. He was trying to find specific items, some of which i had and he wanted to go look at others for pricing. If I see him again and bring it up do you think he would think it strange? Would he be put off if I asked him for tips for preparing myself?

I'm not really up on this kind of thing, so any thoughts are warmly welcomed.




posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


That's a good question! I live in a small town and some of the conversations i participate in on this and other forums aren't necessarily ones which would help my professional reputation.

I also don't know how i would feel knowing my anonymity was dissolving, my vote is unless you KNOWthese people keep the two worlds seperate.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 02:15 PM
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I was introduced to this site by a coworker, many of the other guys in the shop thought he was crazy and it did hurt his professional dealings with some of our other coworkers, they would say things like there goes Bob ( not his real name) the conspiracy nut. It really makes you leery of opening your thoughts up to others, but if I know someone is like minded on the issues I have no problem discussing it with them.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


I think it would have been okay to tell him about ATS and it's 'Survival' forum because he was preparing a BOB. That way he can check out anything his heart desires on survival and if he happens to wonder into another forum then that's his decision.

I understand that some of these threads may seem embarrassing at times but that's the balance of things.

Just tell them ATS is a collection of forums. A bible of sorts. Nothing more, nothing less. Give them the key and let them choose what door they want to enter.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


We're familiarized and understand the meaning behind the acronym. Sometimes when I talk to my mom about some news item and I mention ATS, she says what does that stand for again?

When I tell her she rolls her eyes and then asks, and what do you guys discuss? Conspiracies…

Oh, (rolls eyes again) and goes back to watching The View or Piers Morgan.

End of conversation.

Most people in the main stream don't really want to know more about the wider world. Especially "Top Secret Conspiracies". lol. It puts them off.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by Daavin
 


I did introduce a coworker to this site the other day I have no idea if he joined. It was his last day though, so I figured it would be fine. We often talked very conspiracy type subjects at work when no customers were around.

I'm hoping he does join, he knew a whole hell of a lot of stuff, and has lead a very interesting life. Unfortunately just as i was getting to know him he sold his place, quit and is moving back east to be with his kids.

The guy I was helping with B.O.B. was a customer



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by TheLieWeLive
 


Yeah, he is a customer though which is kind of why I'm iffy on it. He doesn't know me outside of our one interaction the other day. I figure if he comes in more and we talk more maybe i will bring it up passively. Mention something I read here or something of that matter, rather than " Hey, you may fit in at ATS. "



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


I'm incredibly lucky to have family as out there and open minded as I am. My Dad, and fiance are the two that roll their eyes anytime I talk about anything I have come across here. I talk about all sorts of stuff, whether it be conspiracy, world news, local events etc. I just find it all interesting, and enjoy talking about it whether I believe everything or not.

My mother loves it, and she walks a slightly less average path herself. She is a Reiki master, practices natueropathy, wiccan beliefs and the like so she is fairly open minded to many of the things discussed here.

My Dad how ever is the kind of guy if he can't touch it, it doesn't exist. My fiance comes from a religious background, although she does not practice, if it isn't god given she doesn't believe it ha ha.

My brother enjoys all my world news, science and technology chats, my wonder with all things outside our small rock.

So I'm sorry you get the rolling eyes treatment, it really is fun to have people you can sit down with and talk about this stuff with.

I will cautiously approach the idea with this man if he ever comes in again. I don't want to sound crazy or anything.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


I am one who brings ATS up regularly to people. Sometimes I get strange looks and a change of conversation and sometimes it starts a great discussion. Then again my family is my job so it is always on personal time. I really don't see anything wrong with mentioning the survival forum when discussing a BOB in the line of work though. There is a wealth of information from a large group of experienced people.

As far as doing any disaster preparation of your own, I always remind people that no matter where you live or work there is always one or more natural disasters that are common enough to be prepared for. For me and my family for example, we could be subjected to long power outages in sub zero temps or a wildfire or an earthquake at any given time, depending on the season. With two small kids it only makes sense to be ready to properly care for them regardless of the circumstances. Each circumstance is as unique as the individual approaching it. We all need the same things to survive, but its amazing how much things can vary beyond that.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


So I'm sorry you get the rolling eyes treatment, it really is fun to have people you can sit down with and talk about this stuff with.

Lucky you. My whole family is hardcore Republican, Ronald Reagan, John Waynum, Rush Limbau, Every Sunday churchian, CNN, Judy Woodruff, Piers Morgan, Disney Land, Easter Bunny, Santa Claus, Zoos and circus, Good Roman citizens.

Grab hold of me I think I'm going to hurl, lol.

I can never broach any of these topics with any of them. Their heads are buried too deep in the sand ad they will raise their voices instantly if their narrow world views are at all questioned.

At least I'm free. Thanks for sharing your families mature outlook. It gives me hope for the larger world.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by woodsmom
 


Woods, I'm starting to really enjoy talking with you on here. Thank you for your input. I'm just trying to be careful as I met this man at my place of business. I do not want to give him the wrong impression or soil my image at work. How ever at the same time what does any of this have to do with my image. If anything, it should be obvious. I'm a pretty vocal outspoken man, very strong in my morals and care for others. It would make sense a curious soul such as myself would enjoy discussions such as we have on ATS.


I have always been a bit of an outdoorsman, so I do have quite a few things many would consider on a preparation list for any disaster, how ever I am not organized nor is any of my supplies easily accessible. I will admit given a disaster situation of any kind much of what I have would be cumbersome and unruly. I have given this a bit of thought now, and would like to start looking into some tips and ideas from others. I can hunt, fish, grow my own food if needed how ever I have never really thought of having to do so to survive outside of fantasy and how fun I think it would be. When I have food going fishing and not catching a thing is no big deal, going out for a deer and getting rained on, and coming up bupkiss is no big deal how ever, if I had to do these things to survive I worry now I may not have the right things necessary for my own or my families survival.

I don't necessarily need to take it to extremes, but one of the things I'm going to do is get back into running. I have gotten lazy and consider myself too busy, but if I had to physically work for every ounce of sustainance I don't think I'd get through more than two days before my body would hate me. I'm not in bad shape, but I could be much better.

The old coleman stove in the garage is something I will think about. A green cylinder of gas is not gonna last much more than a day for food and water prep for my family if we lost power, had an earthquake, or something else, and keeping more than the two disposable cylinders I usually have for camping could be dangerous if we had a quake. if one or more of those tanks were crushed the house could explode or catch fire. So I will be looking for a simpler solution. I live on a mountain, perhaps a simple A-frame over a fire would be an easier, renewable solution for heat, water and food prep.

I've just got my mind going bonkers. I'm going to start passing my really simple and basic skills on to my family as well. I'm not sure they know how to start a fire from scratch, catch fish, tie a lure or fly, clean a fish, or game.

Stuff I don't even think twice over and if god forbid I was hurt even if minimally they could not do on their own.

So I think I will be trying to learn and teach my family some skills, keep some basic tools and supplies that are easily used and carried. Camping is not survival, and if it were something really bad most of what I have could not be brought far. Forest fires are a big thing where I am, and if we had to go, my collapseable recurve and 12 shafts are easy to carry, same with my knife sharpening kit and flint, but everything else is a pack in the truck type item. I just want to look at it. I know im babbling but this is a fresh thought ha ha



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


Sounds a lot like the misses family ha ha, I feel your pain. I grew up in a fairly lucky situation when I really look at it. My family pretty much let me be who and what I wanted to be.

I love my mother's passions and really think they are useful skills, and my dad is one of the best fisherman I have ever known.

How ever outside of the two passions in their life they are pretty reliant on today's commodities, Dad is diabetic, mom can't have gluten. It makes for a few interesting considerations for me. Ultimately if the # hit the fan I'd want to be able to round the immediate family up and do something, and I'm sure we may be okay but i would like to make it easier. There is a major river near us full of fish year round, but you can't survive only on fish, and the winters here are mighty rough. Cold and wet.



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 



Sounds a lot like the misses family ha ha, I feel your pain. I grew up in a fairly lucky situation when I really look at it. My family pretty much let me be who and what I wanted to be.

Wonderful. I really mean that. I feel your joy. It was a long road for me, but I am finally free from the families views. The pain came from the guilt of not believing in their paradigm. What saved me was my open rebellion. Having not been killed by that, I can now finally relax and enjoy life and be who I really am.

ETA: I no longer have to be like them or try and fix them.

Thanks for letting me share…
edit on 16-11-2013 by intrptr because: additional



posted on Nov, 16 2013 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


Thanks, you too. It honestly sounds like you are on the right track. Any survivalist, I am not, will tell you that knowledge is everything. All the gear in the world won't help you if you don't now how to start a fire. Teaching the kids is always good. It's vital to get everyone involved if at all possible. My 8 year old learned how to start a fire with a flint last winter, and he was so proud of himself. It was also a good chance to teach him when and where building a fire is actually appropriate, you know how boys can be. He can also identify the edible berries and some greens locally as well.

Good luck with all of it. It sounds like you are on the right track. Don't worry too much about other people either. The skeptics will be the first people to call or show up at your door if something does go wrong. They just don't like to see the realities that we are faced with now. It's easier to keep the blinders on.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by intrptr
 



Hey happy to talk any time my friend!

We all come from very different walks of life.

Love to hear what drove you to come to ATS, and I'd be willing to share as well.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 12:46 AM
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woodsmom
reply to post by Hijinx
 


Thanks, you too. It honestly sounds like you are on the right track. Any survivalist, I am not, will tell you that knowledge is everything. All the gear in the world won't help you if you don't now how to start a fire. Teaching the kids is always good. It's vital to get everyone involved if at all possible. My 8 year old learned how to start a fire with a flint last winter, and he was so proud of himself. It was also a good chance to teach him when and where building a fire is actually appropriate, you know how boys can be. He can also identify the edible berries and some greens locally as well.

Good luck with all of it. It sounds like you are on the right track. Don't worry too much about other people either. The skeptics will be the first people to call or show up at your door if something does go wrong. They just don't like to see the realities that we are faced with now. It's easier to keep the blinders on.


Happy to hear some one still wants to bring up their young ones with necessary life skills. I know we often refer to them as survival skills, but the truth is every individual should have these skills. It should be as natural as speaking, writing, or eating.

If you have anything to pass on let me know. You're a mother, even if it's an easy way to make a little go a long way, tips for dealing with kids, any skill or knowledge you can pass on.



posted on Nov, 17 2013 @ 12:30 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


You really made me think this morning, and I think it's just too early for that. Just kidding.


I would honestly have to say that the teaching of skills comes mostly from our lifestyle. My youngest was on the boat halibut fishing with us at a year old. My oldest has been berry picking and trout fishing with us just about as long. These boys are so used to having a fishing pole in their hands that they are both bugging me to go ice fishing, and we can't go until January because of ice thickness issues.

They are both with me when I get us ready for any of our trips into the wilderness, so they both have been somewhat involved with preparing the survival gear that I haul everywhere. Without kids I could get lost in the woods for most of a summer with just a backpack. Now it's all about first aid kits and food and water, I also tote numerous extra layers of clothes for them everywhere. They always get wet and or muddy and it's too cold to leave them wet. Redundancy is the only way to go with kids.

Always buy secondhand when possible too, kids thrash on stuff. I have had to throw away multiple pairs of jeans that I couldn't even get patches from. In my world, they really only need 2 or 3 decent outfits. The rest all consists of play clothes, they already have stains so they don't get in trouble for getting dirty. No holes though, that's where I draw the line. My boys are always presentable in public.

As far as stretching a little into a lot, rice is amazing. I can make a meal that will feed my family for 3 meals with rice. For example, 2 frozen chicken thighs, a bag of frozen veggies ( or leftovers) and about 3 cups of cooked rice makes a huge pot of food. I typically season everything well and sauce it up with some butter, cheese and homemade and canned broth. Scratch cooking is also much cheaper and healthier.

Really just practice what you want your kids to know. Take them camping and hiking and fishing as much as possible. I think that what is really lacking in people is the fun outdoors experiences that we used to enjoy. Sadly we have too many indoor distractions. I love my Internet, it keeps me mentally occupied during the winter, and even up to speed with the world in the summer. Too much technology only seems to entrap people into a fantasy world though.

Haha! Back on topic, I was going to mention a fire pit to you yesterday for safe outdoor cooking. A chunk of used or leftover large diameter metal pipe with a gravel bottom and stones around the perimeter makes for a nice enclosed fire pit. It's a nice place to enjoy a good beer too.

Even a weber style charcoal grill give you a place to start a fire and cook outdoors if you can't put in a fire pit. Either way all you really need then is kindling and some fire wood, or charcoal and starter fluid.





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