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posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:21 PM
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What would happen if one generated conditions in which, a human was placed into a devise/sphere, that could be rotated at 99.99999999999% the speed of light?

Of course assuming that there was no problem with inertia.

Any thoughts?
edit on 14-11-2013 by Kashai because: Added content




posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:30 PM
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reply to post by Kashai
 

I am pretty sure this experiment would result in a warm bowl of Relativistic Red Soup.

If the body were to somehow remain intact, which is impossible, then time would be flowing at significantly different rates within portions of the same body... which, I guess, would yield the same ultimate result as above. Certain death.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:31 PM
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reply to post by Kashai
 


What would happen if one generated conditions in which, a human was placed into a devise/sphere, that could be rotated at 99.99999999999% the speed of light?

Of course assuming that there was no problem with inertia

Any thoughts?

I'm not sure, but I'm getting pretty damn dizzy, just thinking about it.

See ya,
Milt



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:33 PM
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reply to post by Kashai
 


According to the laws of special relativity, the faster the person was moving, the slower time would flow for that person, so that when they exit the machine they would have travelled into the future.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:35 PM
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reply to post by InTheFlesh1980
 


OK so assume that at some point in human development the technology exist to compensate for that.

I mean can we then send a person into the future?

Any thoughts?



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:39 PM
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Kashai
What would happen if one generated conditions in which, a human was placed into a devise/sphere, that could be rotated at 99.99999999999% the speed of light?

Any thoughts?


Well anywhere in known space you'd be destroyed by radiation.


Edelstein's work showed that a starship traveling at just 99 percent of the speed of light would get a radiation dose from hydrogen of 61 sieverts per second, when just one tenth of that number of sieverts would deliver a fatal dose for humans. And that's not even the 99.999998 percent of light-speed necessary to make the journey to the center of the Milky Way in 10 years

At the higher speed, the human crew of a starship would experience something like getting struck by the high-energy proton beam from the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. On top of killing the crew, such powerful levels of energy would also likely destroy the starship electronics.


source

Assuming that you and the device are in some sort of perfect vacuum, I don't think you'd notice anything except the fact that you'd already run out of energy. Assuming you had no problem colliding with particles and near infinite energy, you would just spin along aging a lot slower than anyone not in your machine.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:44 PM
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reply to post by Kashai
 

I believe the sphere itself would collapse into a singularity. There were a lot of nines after the dot.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:44 PM
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reply to post by theantediluvian
 


The function of this thread is to conclude the somehow technology in perhaps 10,000 years has overcome any threat to the human, inside such a object.

edit on 14-11-2013 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:47 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Yea a volunteer could travel into the future and present the truth about what really happened.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:51 PM
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Scientists have found examples of things going faster than the speed of light so its certainly possible.

The fact that we haven't figured it out yet is just that.

A waiting game.

Einstein's theory is solid but it contains (exceptions). It is those very exceptions that will give us faster than light travel one day.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 10:55 PM
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reply to post by Spookybelle
 


The issue here is in relation to the effects of "Time Dilation", look it up prior to you next response.

Any thoughts?



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by Kashai
 


first we need to correctly difrentiate between rotational frequency and velocity


putting it VERY simply :

a rotating object has a rotational frequency / period - generally expressed as RPM [ revolutions / minuite ]

linear velocity [ like the speed of light ] is expressed as a distance / time period - ie m / second

of course a point on a rotating object also has a linear velocity - a function of its RPM and distance from the axis of rotation

further - inertia is not a function of linear velocity - but of mass and the objects acceleration / deceleration rate [ for simplicity I ignore the inertia of vector shifts ]

so - having said that - do you wish to answer a different question ?



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:07 PM
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Kashai
reply to post by Spookybelle
 


The issue here is in relation to the effects of "Time Dilation", look it up prior to you next response.

Any thoughts?


Perhaps if that is what you wanted addressed you should have added that into your OP.

Therefore if someone posts something you don't like than you would be wise to attribute the blame to yourself as your non-descriptive post was about as generic as they come.

I suggest if you want to discuss Time Dilation that you go make a new thread because this one is now about something else.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:08 PM
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reply to post by ignorant_ape
 


If rotational velocity is beyond half the speed of light to 99.99999999999% the speed of light the object will experience time dilation.
edit on 14-11-2013 by Kashai because: Content Edit



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:09 PM
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reply to post by ignorant_ape
 


What if you can remove the problem of mass and its relation to acceleration?

Seems that is the key.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:10 PM
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reply to post by Spookybelle
 


Had you reviewed posts I began you would find they all start this way.

Honestly, if based upon the OP you cannot figure out what I am saying why are you responding????

Any thoughts?
edit on 14-11-2013 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:15 PM
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Kashai
reply to post by ignorant_ape
 


If rotational velocity is beyond half the speed of light to 99.99999999999% the speed of light the object will experience time dilation.
edit on 14-11-2013 by Kashai because: Content Edit


No need to go that fast to experience time dilation. It's been measured in the discrepancies between clocks on GPS satellites and Earth-based clocks.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by theantediluvian
 


Exactly


As in do you know why GPS in cars work?

Any thoughts?
edit on 14-11-2013 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:19 PM
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Spookybelle
Scientists have found examples of things going faster than the speed of light so its certainly possible.

The fact that we haven't figured it out yet is just that.

A waiting game.

Einstein's theory is solid but it contains (exceptions). It is those very exceptions that will give us faster than light travel one day.


Would you care to elaborate? That statement is completely untrue.



posted on Nov, 14 2013 @ 11:24 PM
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Kashai
reply to post by theantediluvian
 


Exactly


As in do you know why GPS in cars work?

Any thoughts?
edit on 14-11-2013 by Kashai because: Added content


I believe basically there are satellites with synchronized clocks transmitting a signal and the receiver triangulates it's position by measuring the difference in the time it takes for the signal to arrive from each? Adjustments would then be made to the satellites' clocks to compensate for discrepancies arriving from time dilation.





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