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Wondering what that super bright star is in the sky? check this out!

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posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 07:01 PM
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C21H30O2I
It is Venus! It has been super bright. Also, the star Antares not to far from Venus was glowing and doing it's color changes in August through October. The star Capella in the NE has been bright also, around sunset.


If it's Venus, it's strange because supposedly it doesn't have a moon. I was looking at it yesterday South Westerly and I could clearly see what looked like a moon over and a tad to the left but behind it with my own eyes. What ever it is looks like three bright balls clumped together in a triangle and extremely bright. I don't have a camera that will photograph it so I'm stuck with my own viewpoint with nothing to share.




posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by StoutBroux
 


I believe you. Unfortunately, the sky in my area has been under heavy cloud cover for a week. I will check things out when I have a clearer view.



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 07:40 PM
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I should add, I have been looking at that bright object every evening. We have had very clear skies in my area for the past 10 days or so. One evening it was so bright it was unbelievable. However, yesterday evening was the first time I could see what looked like a moon behind the object. Our moon was bright, not a cloud in the sky and the view was extremely clear. The object itself was not as bright as I have seen it nor as twinkly if that makes sense. But the image is clear in my mind and I know what I saw.



posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by innersollus
 


Don't be fooled. I had a look at a couple of the videos. YT is full of these types of videos. They are uploaded by people that are simply deceitful or that don't understand that it is a camera artifact.

See following video. Anyone can do it and different camera types produce different shapes.




posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 12:32 AM
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StoutBroux

C21H30O2I
It is Venus! It has been super bright. Also, the star Antares not to far from Venus was glowing and doing it's color changes in August through October. The star Capella in the NE has been bright also, around sunset.


If it's Venus, it's strange because supposedly it doesn't have a moon. I was looking at it yesterday South Westerly and I could clearly see what looked like a moon over and a tad to the left but behind it with my own eyes. What ever it is looks like three bright balls clumped together in a triangle and extremely bright. I don't have a camera that will photograph it so I'm stuck with my own viewpoint with nothing to share.


#1. If Venus had a moon, even a large one as big as the Earth's moon you wouldn't beable to see it with your naked eye or even a pair of binoculars.

#2. What you took to be a "moon" most likely was a background star many light years away from Venus and our whole solar system.

#3. Give me the precise time and precise location and I will tell you what star you saw near it.
edit on 21-11-2013 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 03:30 AM
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I am told it is comet ISON



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 06:24 PM
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wmd_2008
reply to post by fenian8
 


Rather sad user name you picked.


Good job i don`t give a flying orangutan what you think about my user name then isn`t it!

Glad you noticed it now shuffle along weirdo




posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


I have seen what you are talking about and it is not Venus, not Jupiter or any of the other planets, I use Sky view on my iPhone and there is nothing near this thing that is identified. Problem now is it has been so cloudy and getting too cold for me to stand out and try to find it, but it was there last night when the clouds finally cleared, back to cloudy today.

Some say Spica or Regulas, but it is midway between those two stars and blinks red, green and white.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 04:00 AM
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reply to post by whatnext21
 


It took me Hours to stop laughing at this post! I still cant stop long enough to form a proper response! LMAO!

So you are telling us all... Those of us with an educated and optical advantage are WRONG?

Because your iphone told you so?

Run! RUN as Fast as you Can!

Dig a hole a burry yourself as fast as you can to avoid the impending DOOM!

The rest of us will stay outside and enjoy the view.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 06:19 AM
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reply to post by livinglifeseekingtruth2
 


I am so happy that I could provide you with that extended laugh, hope you enjoyed it. However others on here have seen what the OP refers to, and I shared my observations, and it wasn't Spica, it was between Regulas and Arturus. Laugh away...



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:22 AM
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StoutBroux
If it's Venus, it's strange because supposedly it doesn't have a moon. I was looking at it yesterday South Westerly and I could clearly see what looked like a moon over and a tad to the left but behind it with my own eyes. What ever it is looks like three bright balls clumped together in a triangle and extremely bright. I don't have a camera that will photograph it so I'm stuck with my own viewpoint with nothing to share.



JadeStar
#1. If Venus had a moon, even a large one as big as the Earth's moon you wouldn't beable to see it with your naked eye or even a pair of binoculars.

#2. What you took to be a "moon" most likely was a background star many light years away from Venus and our whole solar system.

#3. Give me the precise time and precise location and I will tell you what star you saw near it.
edit on 21-11-2013 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)


JadeStar:
I agree that 'StoutBroux' was probably looking at another star in the background -- possibly Sigma Sagitarrii (σ Sgr), also known as 'Nunki', which is a visible star that was near Venus on the night in question.

However, if Venus had a Moon, it could very possibly be visible with a pair of binoculars (although that may depend on the size of that Moon). For example, Jupiter is much farther away than Venus is, and its four main moons (Callisto, Europa Ganymede, and Io) are are visible from Earth with a relatively modest pair of binoculars. I can see them with my 16X binoculars. Galileo, who discovered Jupiter's moons, used a telescope that had only a 20X magnification.

Granted, Jupiter's Moons are large, and a moon of Venus would probably be much smaller than those, but Venus is also much closer to Earth.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:31 AM
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so which one is the one we can see one of it's moons with the naked eye, i have an older celestron scope sitting around so maybe i'll have a loot at it sometime. my guess is saturn or jupiter.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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Soylent Green Is People

StoutBroux
If it's Venus, it's strange because supposedly it doesn't have a moon. I was looking at it yesterday South Westerly and I could clearly see what looked like a moon over and a tad to the left but behind it with my own eyes. What ever it is looks like three bright balls clumped together in a triangle and extremely bright. I don't have a camera that will photograph it so I'm stuck with my own viewpoint with nothing to share.



JadeStar
#1. If Venus had a moon, even a large one as big as the Earth's moon you wouldn't beable to see it with your naked eye or even a pair of binoculars.

#2. What you took to be a "moon" most likely was a background star many light years away from Venus and our whole solar system.

#3. Give me the precise time and precise location and I will tell you what star you saw near it.
edit on 21-11-2013 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)


JadeStar:
I agree that 'StoutBroux' was probably looking at another star in the background -- possibly Sigma Sagitarrii (σ Sgr), also known as 'Nunki', which is a visible star that was near Venus on the night in question.

However, if Venus had a Moon, it could very possibly be visible with a pair of binoculars (although that may depend on the size of that Moon).


Exactly.





For example, Jupiter is much farther away than Venus is, and its four main moons (Callisto, Europa Ganymede, and Io) are are visible from Earth with a relatively modest pair of binoculars. I can see them with my 16X binoculars. Galileo, who discovered Jupiter's moons, used a telescope that had only a 20X magnification.


You should probably have mentioned Ganymede is the largest moon in the solar system and all of Jupiters moons like the planet itself are massive.

When talking about a moon of Venus I was thinking more Phobos and Demos sized than the Jupiter moons or even our moon which would be barely visible through binocs if it orbited Venus.


pquote]
Granted, Jupiter's Moons are large, and a moon of Venus would probably be much smaller than those, but Venus is also much closer to Earth.


A lot would depend on albedo and like you said the size of the moon.

The fact is, there is no moon orbiting Venus. And anyone can imagine hypothetical moons which could orbit Venus but none would likely be anywhere near the size of the moons of Jupiter. More like something between our moon and Mar's tiny moons.






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