Chris Hadfield, Astronaut, We don't know what the universe is made of...

page: 1
23
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 06:31 PM
link   


Listen at 27 minutes

So this is a great podcast i think anyone who is interested in science, space, and philosophy should listen to this podcast.

In this podcast Cmdr Chris Hadfield admits that sciencists have no idea what their doing. I'll break down what he says.



we dont know what the universe is made of, we can only account for what 5% of the known universe is made of, we dont even know what 95% of the universe is even made of, so we call it dark energy and dark matter.

we talk as if were conclusively brilliant and we understand everything, i mean were still calling everything dark matter, and dark energy and we have no idea. im just trying to figure it all out.

its another word for i dont know(dark energy/matter)


This reminds me of conversations i have with students in science programs and how they refer to what their learning as the end all be all to knowledge in the universe.

I'm also reminded of a lot of posters on ATS who think science has it all figured out.

I think this guy is credible when he says these things.
edit on 12-11-2013 by onequestion because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-11-2013 by onequestion because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 07:11 PM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


Imagine the universe like a bowl of jello in a big open space. The open space is outerspace and the jello is innerspace. You put a fire cracker in the jello and that's the big bang. It blows jello all out into outer space. So you have two universes. One is space dotted with matter and the other is matter dotted with space. Eventually all the jelli gets pulled back in the bowl and explodes again.

That's my jello theory.
As for what its made of... godssnot (that's my godssnot theory).



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 07:23 PM
link   
reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


I have a theory to and it goes a little somethin like this.....(run dmc background)

The universe is an outward reflection of the mind.

Im still working out the rest.



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 07:33 PM
link   
This is as true as anything I have ever read here, We have no real clue. we are only newborns in an ageless and timeless block of space attached to infinity. I honestly do not buy the 5% number, more like .09% Once we can reach beyound our solar system on a regular basis, then we can get some good answers to questions we have not thought of as yet....



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 07:33 PM
link   
reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


I second your jello universe theory


But it needs to be an atomic jello that is capable of fusion, so that when it
folds back in on itself and condenses, it can explode. Similar to a supernova, would be a good example.
We can't just have some unseen hand dropping a cracker in there.



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 07:40 PM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


I've thought that too, that the names "Dark matter" and "Dark energy" are meaningless. It's like naming it "We dunno energy" - we don't know what it is. Nobody knows what it is. Which is fun for students interested in taking up astrophysics and related fields, there is plenty to discover yet. Most of it, if fact.



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 08:08 PM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 




I'm also reminded of a lot of posters on ATS who think science has it all figured out.


Now they will come for you! Careful: pics or it didn't happen. What is your reference? Your reference is bogus. Prove the negative. How can the scientific method ever be wrong? Blah-de-freeking-blah


I think the guy is dead on. It does not discount what we already understand pretty well. He is just pointing out there is a considerable volume of stuff we don't know. Even more we don't know that we don't know. Theories evolve, improve. Or get thrown out all together.

Perhaps some of that intransigence comes from a desire to be right all the time or appear infallible. It takes courage to admit the first horse out of the gate may not have been on course and corrections need to be made. I am sure there are many scientists who fully embrace this but there are those few here on ATS who don't quite get that.



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 08:50 PM
link   
reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


I share the same theory, I always called it the Pandora's box theory. Not sure if it's a good name though.

The mind ponders.... Just how much matter would be needed in a super-massive black hole before it goes pop and scatters jello all over gods living room? Does it only happen when all the pieces are put back into a hypothetical "Pandora's box"?



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 09:59 PM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


WHAT A BREATH OF FRESH AIR AND TRUTH.

Better than the arrogance of Stephen Hawkings.

Thanks. Congrats.



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 10:00 PM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


I've known this since I was a child.

No one knows what the # any of this is.

And I must be twisted...because I love this aspect of our collective existence.



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 10:02 PM
link   

BO XIAN
reply to post by onequestion
 


WHAT A BREATH OF FRESH AIR AND TRUTH.

Better than the arrogance of Stephen Hawkings.

Thanks. Congrats.


Anyone who remotely thinks that Stephen Hawkins has 1/10000th of a CLUE as to how this all started is an IDIOT.

THEY DO NOT KNOW.



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 11:00 PM
link   

supremecommander

Anyone who remotely thinks that Stephen Hawkins has 1/10000th of a CLUE as to how this all started is an IDIOT.

THEY DO NOT KNOW.


THX THX

ABSOLUTELY INDEED.

Where did such arrogance originate from . . .

--other than hell
--other than their ATTACHMENT DISORDERED need to puff themselves up etc.

???

"I don't know" is a perfectly decent answer, when it's true!

It's a lot better than concocting wild haired conjectures . . . which mostly serve to flatter egos instead of shed any light on reality or science.



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 11:01 PM
link   
I have a theory that there is an 'energy' throughout the universe that moves faster than the speed of light that is this substance of the 95% of energy. The best way to describe my idea is kind of like the way a water-skier stays on top the water as long as they are moving fast enough. Relatively speaking in my theory, the universe and it's laws of physics (the water-skier) is stationary while the WATER (the dark energy) is moving along 'under' us faster than the speed of light. This keeps our universe and it's observable 'laws' from 'sinking' so to speak. If we were able to break the speed of light, relatively speaking, we would then be moving at a rate that would be relatively similar to the dark matter (water) and instead of skimming across it, we would 'sink' (wormholes?).

I also theorize that this fast moving dark matter is super tiny, to the scale of millionths of the size of an atom. The 'dark energy' moves (curves) around atoms mostly never colliding with them, similar to the way air particles move around the cross-section of a moving airplane wing that creates 'lift'. The lower pressure created by the stretching of space between dark energy particles curving around each atom causes atoms to generally become attracted to each other, resulting in atomic level 'gravitational pull'. The more massive the collection of atoms, the more collective this force is, eventually producing measurable results called gravity.

I would love for somebody to debate, expand, or debunk my theory but the number of people who are able to grasp the concepts are few. I'm sure ATS is full of people who enjoy discussions like this, I just don't know any in real life.



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 11:17 PM
link   
reply to post by SouthernForkway26
 


I think there is another form of the universe that exist as thought. Its obvious that its real because our thoughts manifest into reality.

The same thing happens on a cosmic level.

What is the space between your thoughts.



posted on Nov, 12 2013 @ 11:58 PM
link   
I think this video is applicable to this discussion. Interesting talk from an interesting guy.




posted on Nov, 13 2013 @ 12:13 AM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


A persons thoughts are real to them, but do their thoughts actually occupy a physical space? If an old thought is replaced with a new thought, is there any physical change in the brain? Or is it just a change in the pathways of the neurons in the brain that allow for a difference in thought? I don't know enough about the brain to say.

It does make sense that if each brain has its own sentient, conscious universe than it would be that people exist in their own universe in their heads in addition to our shared physical universe. It would also be likely that after a person dies than there should be a loss of energy within the closed system of the body if an 'individual internal universe' is lost at death. I do agree that there is some kind of energy lost from within the physical body at the exact moment of death greater than the cessation of bodily functions but it is probably something we won't understand until we have evolved quite a bit and can look back on humans as a primitive species. We haven't even figured out the physical universe that we all share, let alone each individual one that may be inside of us...
edit on 13-11-2013 by SouthernForkway26 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 13 2013 @ 03:01 AM
link   
Nice thread... Showing the usual mix of esoterism, lack of knowledge and some wisdom..

Just because we (non-scientists) don't know what Dark Matter/Energy is, this doesn't mean that scientists haven't figured out

a

freaking

lot

of information about that Dark Matter/Energy. Semi-Ironic title about Dark Matter

Some just didn't/don't/will never (want to) know that, I guess.



posted on Nov, 13 2013 @ 05:06 AM
link   

onequestion
reply to post by SouthernForkway26
 


I think there is another form of the universe that exist as thought. Its obvious that its real because our thoughts manifest into reality.

The same thing happens on a cosmic level.

What is the space between your thoughts.


2 inches?

hahaha, i have thought about this. we know absolutely nothing!

don't know what a black hole is, how big is the universe, what holds galaxies together, if we even have a companion star in our own solar system and etc to the 10th!

s&f!



posted on Nov, 13 2013 @ 10:07 AM
link   

SouthernForkway26
I have a theory that there is an 'energy' throughout the universe that moves faster than the speed of light that is this substance of the 95% of energy. The best way to describe my idea is kind of like the way a water-skier stays on top the water as long as they are moving fast enough. Relatively speaking in my theory, the universe and it's laws of physics (the water-skier) is stationary while the WATER (the dark energy) is moving along 'under' us faster than the speed of light. This keeps our universe and it's observable 'laws' from 'sinking' so to speak. If we were able to break the speed of light, relatively speaking, we would then be moving at a rate that would be relatively similar to the dark matter (water) and instead of skimming across it, we would 'sink' (wormholes?).

I also theorize that this fast moving dark matter is super tiny, to the scale of millionths of the size of an atom. The 'dark energy' moves (curves) around atoms mostly never colliding with them, similar to the way air particles move around the cross-section of a moving airplane wing that creates 'lift'. The lower pressure created by the stretching of space between dark energy particles curving around each atom causes atoms to generally become attracted to each other, resulting in atomic level 'gravitational pull'. The more massive the collection of atoms, the more collective this force is, eventually producing measurable results called gravity.

I would love for somebody to debate, expand, or debunk my theory but the number of people who are able to grasp the concepts are few. I'm sure ATS is full of people who enjoy discussions like this, I just don't know any in real life.


Well done, this is a brilliant description of whats actually going on. As with all things, it's a matter of size. Smaller "things" move faster and more of them fit in the same space (perspective relative).

As for dark matter, that's just the cumulative sum of ALL the smaller as yet unknown distinct scale levels. And there are quite possibly infinite scale levels.



posted on Nov, 13 2013 @ 12:00 PM
link   
reply to post by onequestion
 


Our universe is but one part of many,and all of them together make up a creature of unimaginable size on an incomprehensibly gargantuan planet in another bigger universe,and that goes on and on forever.
In both directions,bigger or smaller.

Sort of fractal like in a way.
Maybe.
Cool thread





new topics
top topics
 
23
<<   2 >>

log in

join