'Strongest Typhoon in History!'10,000 Filipinos DEAD, 12 Million Affected, VN & KH next

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posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 12:09 PM
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Vietnam, Cambodia next!



So, some are saying thinks like its the worst storm or typhoon to make landfall. I'm not quick to dismiss it given the sheer ten thousand presumably dead, and millions affected.

How does it measure up?

www.theguardian.com...


Typhoon Haiyan, described as the as the strongest tropical cyclone to make landfall in recorded history, hit the Philippines with winds of 195mph. How does it compare to other tropical cyclones?

Hitting the Philippines with winds of 195mph, typhoon Haiyan has been described as the strongest tropical cyclone to make landfall in recorded history.

As Masters explains, Haiyan although the strongest tropical cyclone on record to make landfall in world history, it is actually the fourth strongest tropical cyclone in history. We've put the list of official strongest cyclones in world history that Master cites into the table below:

The strongest tropical cyclones in world history
Super Typhoon Year Winds, mph mb
Landfall?
Nancy 1961 215 882 Made landfall as a Cat 2 in Japan, killing 191 people
Violet 1961 205 886 Made landfall in Japan as a tropical storm, killing 2 people
Ida 1958 200 877 Made landfall as a Cat 1 in Japan, killing 1269 people
Haiyan 2013 195 895 Made landfall in the P


Interesting, how can they not take into account the kill-strength of the storm? Apparently one that killed 10,000 (and has yet to reach VN nor KH) is already declared less strong than storms that killed 191 people in 1961 or 1,269 people in 1958?




posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 12:15 PM
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As the oceans continue to warm at an accelerating rate, we can expect to see more of this kind of storm.


gardener

Interesting, how can they not take into account the kill-strength of the storm? Apparently one that killed 10,000 (and has yet to reach VN nor KH) is already declared less strong than storms that killed 191 people in 1961 or 1,269 people in 1958?


Well, which is "stronger"? A hydrogen bomb detonated in the desert killing 0 people, or a .22 bullet shot in Chicago that lands in someones head or heart and kills 1 person?

edit on 11/10/2013 by CaticusMaximus because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 12:24 PM
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Good point!

However I'm questioning how do they determine storms in 1950-60 were stronger back then than this one, for example.

Comparing oranges to oranges, not bomb to a bullet. Wondering if worst storm better suits. Using your example. Ie, 10 atoms in the uninhabited desert or 1 upon Hiro?



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 12:28 PM
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These kind of storms are supposed to become more common now. I do not think that the cause is just global warming for these storms though. I think it is that we are somehow altering earths magnetic field.



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 12:30 PM
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reply to post by gardener
 


This is only the beginning, mark my words. 2014 will be a wild year!



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 12:33 PM
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One of the major things used is railroad equipment and if it gets knocked off it's tracks. Different wind speeds for different types of equipment



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 12:40 PM
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reply to post by gardener
 


Nobddy will really anything close to the death toll for a long time. That's just an estimate, I'd guess. Hopefully Vietnam and Cambodia have learned from this tragedy, and are moving their citizens to safer ground.



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 12:41 PM
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reply to post by gardener
 





However I'm questioning how do they determine storms in 1950-60 were stronger back then than this one, for example.


wind speed?

maybe




Interesting, how can they not take into account the kill-strength of the storm? Apparently one that killed 10,000 (and has yet to reach VN nor KH) is already declared less strong than storms that killed 191 people in 1961 or 1,269 people in 1958?


Kill strength? you mean body count?

How does that determine the strength?

Strength I would say would be measure by wind speed and amount of rain fall.

Here is a link to Wiki about tropical cyclone scales if it helps

en.wikipedia.org...


I pray for those going through this now and wish and hope the best for all this storm affects.



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 12:46 PM
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Utter devastation.

Some of the reports indicate wind speeds were 195 mph? Thats Indianapolis 500 fast. That kind of energy would bring a powerful storm surge ashore, which it did…

I always wondered why huts in the tropics are built up on stilts. look at whats left…


images.smh.com.au...



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 01:00 PM
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gardener
Vietnam, Cambodia next!


Doom!
Doom!

Oh wait, there's several threads running on this one already, and the storm has now died down to a Category 1 and continuing to weaken.

Isnt the devastation in the Philippines enough already without shouting about places that arent going to get wrecked?
And BTW, its going nowhere freaking near Cambodia.



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 01:04 PM
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gardener
Good point!

However I'm questioning how do they determine storms in 1950-60 were stronger back then than this one, for example.


Strength of a storm is going to be measured in the energy it contains, which as I understand it will be proportional to its wind speeds and internal pressure. The storms are measured at their peaks, of course.

So those other storms in the past may certainly have contained more energy at their peaks than this one did at its. However like the analogy given, how many people a storm kills is not an accurate measure of its raw power.



posted on Nov, 10 2013 @ 01:09 PM
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Posted earlier here
www.abovetopsecret.com...


Please add further comments to the ongoing discussion in the above linked thread.
Thanks




**Thread Closed**





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