HowTo:Stop Nightmares

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posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 06:13 AM
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My main teacher gave us a simple technique to stop nightmares, and it worked - for me at least.

If something is chasing you, or you are running from something unknown, or a variation of trying to back up or get away from something, just turn and face it. Stop and look at it.

The first time this happened to me after I learned this technique (which may be very common now, I'm not up on every current consciousness data base - used to be though) I turned, and got an amazing light show of peace and other high tone emotions and images sweeping through me.

Haven't had a nightmare since, although there have been moments in which something could have seemed very scary but didn't - or doesn't when they occur - at all.

I hope this is new for some people. Now I better take a nap and practice what I preach.

zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz (snoring noises fill the post) zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz




posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 06:21 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


When my youngest has told me of a bad dream or nightmare he had, i always tell him the same thing...you have control over what happens in your own dream.

It's generated in your head, and you control what goes on in your head.

I tell him to turn around, face whatever it is that is frightening him and punch it in the face and kick it in the arse, telling it loudly to go away.

He told me a little while ago that he did indeed dream himself doing this and was laughing at the way the 'monster' reacted to getting a good hard kick in the backside.

Similar thing to what you're saying.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 06:30 AM
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reply to post by MysterX
 


Nice! Has your son stopped having nightmares after doing that? You sound like a good parent, and, having a quick thought, I would think most people who are longtime and thoughtful contributors on ATS are or will be good parents.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 07:08 AM
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If I have a bad dream,when I wake up, I flip over my pillow and I sleep tight for the rest of the night....I tought this to my kids and it seems to work.

I will try your advice next time. Variety is always good..lol



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 07:37 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


Thanks Aleister...we like to think we are good parents.

After all, i promised the Universe that i would be the best parent i could be if we were able to have a family when i used the 'Law of attraction' technique after trying for our two children for over 5 years unsuccessfully..then, we had our family and i sincerely intend to keep my promise.

Thanks again...that made me feel all warm and fuzzy.



My Son still has the occasional disturbed sleep, but he used to have 'night terrors' where he'd wake up literally screaming and wailing.

Virtually inconsolable...he doesn't have those anymore.

edit on 7-11-2013 by MysterX because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 07:50 AM
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I too can control what happens during nightmares, which I have frequently, and are somewhat the same kind (sometimes worse) as Steven King's nightmares.

Anyway, I've handled falling off a cliff and saving myself by growing wings and soaring away, to preventing my drowning when the room I was in began filling with water by simply growing gills so that I could breathe underwater, to dealing with three demons by simply giving them the finger, saying 'buh bye' and waking myself up, etc.

When my children came to me crying from a nightmare and considering their young ages, I did not tell them to face it, but rather told them how I deal with nightmares and that they could wake themselves up any time they wanted to - to end it immediately. My son came to me a bit after that and said he was able to do it.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 08:44 AM
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reply to post by InTheLight
 


You seem to have a good ability to play in your dreams, congrats! I wonder, with the talk of children in the posts, if parents' ability to have some control over mental images while sleeping is passed on or can be learned by their youngsters.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 08:48 AM
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The easiest way to stop nightmares is to not have them.
Try turning down the thermostat to 68 degreesor so, kick on a fan, and bundle up in blankets.
When you sleep you will curl into the fetal position and subconsciously will feel comforted, as if in the womb, and you won't have nightmares to begin with.

I haven't had a nightmare in many years.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 08:58 AM
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Aleister
reply to post by InTheLight
 


You seem to have a good ability to play in your dreams, congrats! I wonder, with the talk of children in the posts, if parents' ability to have some control over mental images while sleeping is passed on or can be learned by their youngsters.





I think it depends on one's creative imagination and perhaps cognitive awareness at any age. I have always been extremely imaginative and as a child was reprimanded many times by teachers for daydreaming in school. That mixed with a strict, unexplained religious upbringing cumulinated, for me, in nightmares, which to me was my subsconcious mind trying to make sense of it all - all alone, because as a child back in the 50-60's life was for most children, to be seen and not heard.

With my children, I wanted to give them the tools, that I learned along the way, to control their mind/thoughts/dreams, and hopefully open up a higher or more disciplined thought process.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 09:35 AM
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Good techniques.
What I do is a variation on counting sheep.
When I lie down to sleep
I mentally dress myself
As if for an adventure
I imagine only real things
That I know to be in good working order
My regular knife is in my regular pocket
My flashlight is in it's regular pocket
I imagine I have my rifle that works
Not the rifle that I wish WOULD work
(no matter how pretty it is)
And on and on
Until sleep takes me.

What this does, is, when I (don't call them nightmares for one thing) have an ADVENTURE dream the things I dressed myself with are there for me and I'm able to take control of the dream because those icons are rooted in reality.
Dressing yourself in wishes makes fishes in dreams.

One time I used my flashlight (Surefire E2D) in my dream. It stopped working in the story of my dream.
When I woke up the dream was still fresh and I tried my light...
It shined once but not twice. Dead battery.

Give this a try. I saw immediate results.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by GrislyAddams
 


Good advice, I've never tried anything like that. Will give it a go. And it's good to see you posting, you seem to write well and can share mucho data with ATS folks. Good to meet you.


reply to post by InTheLight
 


Yes, we go through our own life and overcome or underwhelm the things we face, and then we can advice our children and save them a lot of time. The era you grew up in is one of the best, with the space age, freedom movements, and so many other aspects of human awakening both stirring and growing in leaps and bounds. Dream on!

edit on 7-11-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


Thank you.
Many other forums suffered my learning curve.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by GrislyAddams
 


You're welcome, and now I've given you three of your first four stars (I liked your comments on that Washington state road block thread), and I look forward to your first thread. Please educate us on things you know and we might not when you start "threading" after 20 posts.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 10:08 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


Solid idea, I used to give them a hug and tell it/them I love them and the nightmare lost all power. Now I actually find myself having fun battling things out like a Marvel Superhero, last time I was Iron Man using his hand blasts. Good stuff, but nightmares are a thing of the past once you realize you are the one in control.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by GrislyAddams
 


I used to do a version of that when I was a kid. I would picture myself in a really pretty bedroom with a canopy bed all in pink and with shelves full of pretty dolls. Funny I eventually got the bedroom when I was 13 but by then I had outgrown my love of dolls.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 07:05 PM
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Great one ,

I had a Nightmare when i was a young boy about a hooded character chasing me through the alley behind my house , i remember after having this Nightmare for some time i was never able to get away , so indeed i also just stood still and waited for whatever to happen , and the nightmare was gone.

In my younger years i had very intense nightmares , From witches floating above my bed ,to dreaming there is this presence in the corner of your room and it comes to you and you feel something grabbing you , and then you wake up in sweat


Also fantastic dreams though , in one wich i will never forget i was flying or something about 5 meter above the ground through a forest , i had this dream quite often , and i knew imediatly this was the flying dream and it would be fun again.

At some point it all ended , now i only have wierd alternative reality type of dreams , some feel so real sometimes that for a moment i actually am in doubt if i am dreaming or not.

in the last wierd dream wich occured i opened my paycheck and saw they only deposited half the normal amount


TheGreazel.



posted on Nov, 8 2013 @ 07:03 AM
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JayinAR
The easiest way to stop nightmares is to not have them.
Try turning down the thermostat to 68 degreesor so, kick on a fan, and bundle up in blankets.
When you sleep you will curl into the fetal position and subconsciously will feel comforted, as if in the womb, and you won't have nightmares to begin with.

I haven't had a nightmare in many years.


Curious you should say this mate, both my kids used to dream and we surmise, were also having nightmares while still in the womb...i know it sounds daft, i mean, what on Earth could they possibly be dreaming about and having mightmares over? What would be their experiencial influence?

We thought that it was likely they were aware of the 'outside' of their clostrophobic home they were in, as they are able to see light sources (albeit dimly) and hear sounds and somewhat muffled voices while still in the womb..these were probably the cause or stimulus for the dreaming..confusion, and primal fear over what was happening just beyond their ability to discern.

They used to kick and punch around in there, sometimes it was as though they were trying to run! Strange to watch the lumps and bumps appearing and dissapearing while they were going for it..like something out of an 'alien' movie it was.



posted on Nov, 8 2013 @ 07:07 AM
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reply to post by MysterX
 


Nice, I never thought of fetal nightmares before. I know Ron Hubbard surmised and studied the effects of sound, light, voices, etc. on a child in the womb (Hubbard made lots of innovations, but those have been drowned out by the weight of the established world stomping on his data), but fetal nightmares seems both obvious and interesting. Thanks for expanding my universe.



posted on Nov, 8 2013 @ 07:07 AM
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reply to post by GrislyAddams
 


That's an interesting technique.

It's kind of positive mental projections for the mental adventure you might need to tackle later on in the night.

I'll remember this one.

Thanks.



posted on Nov, 8 2013 @ 07:08 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


My pleasure mate.





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