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Is SOL system part of a Constellation?

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posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 07:41 PM
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sealing
It's proximity when it involves our Sun maybe ?...

...So the closest stars to us, I say make up a constellation.

That may not necessarily be true. Because even the constellations we see are not always made up of stars close to each other.

They may look close to each other as we view them from Earth against the 2D backdrop of the sky we see, but on 3D space, those stars may be nowhere near each other.




posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 04:44 AM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


Star and Flag!

I read this thread from beginning to end and I am not going to address any of the points already made!

I will however try explore a new angle ...

The sun is often associated with the God Apollo


The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo has been variously recognized as a god of light and the sun, truth and prophecy, healing, plague, music, poetry, and more.


Apollo was born on the Island of Delos


Delos had a position as a holy sanctuary for a millennium before Olympian Greek mythology made it the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis. From its Sacred Harbour, the horizon shows the two conical mounds (image below) that have identified landscapes sacred to a goddess in other sites: one, retaining its pre-Greek name Mount Kynthos,[1] is crowned with a sanctuary of Zeus.

Established as a culture center, Delos had an importance that its natural resources could never have offered. In this vein Leto, searching for a birthing-place for Artemis and Apollo, addressed the island:

Delos, if you would be willing to be the abode of my son Phoebus Apollo and make him a rich temple –; for no other will touch you, as you will find: and I think you will never be rich in oxen and sheep, nor bear vintage nor yet produce plants abundantly. But if you have the temple of far-shooting Apollo, all men will bring you hecatombs and gather here, and incessant savour of rich sacrifice will always arise, and you will feed those who dwell in you from the hand of strangers; for truly your own soil is not rich.
—Homeric Hymn to Delian Apollo 51–60


Apollo was thought to reside at Delos for 6months of the year during the summer in the northern hemisphere BUT would travel to Hyperborea on a Swan during the 6months of winter!


Callimachus sang that Apollo rode on the back of a swan to the land of the Hyperboreans during the winter months.

Note: Quote is from wiki link on Apollo.

The Cygnus constellation is associated with the swan.


Cygnus /ˈsɪɡnəs/ is a northern constellation lying on the plane of the Milky Way, deriving its name from the Latinized Greek word for swan. The swan is one of the most recognizable constellations of the northern summer and autumn, it features a prominent asterism known as the Northern Cross (in contrast to the Southern Cross). Cygnus was among the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations.


The constellation of Cygnus has a star very close to the Earths solar system only a mere 11.4 light years away.


. 61 Cygni is a binary star divisible in large binoculars or a small amateur telescope. It is 11.4 light-years from Earth and has a period of 650 years. Both components are orange-hued dwarf (main sequence) stars; the primary is of magnitude 5.2 and the secondary is of magnitude 6.1. 61 Cygni is significant because Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel determined its parallax in 1838, the first star to have a known parallax.


Hence I would propose that Sol is in the constellation of Cygnus!

I have further proof that our solar system trails behind Cygnus as we rotate around the Milky Way Galaxy BUT that requires video and edited to show picture embeds and may do that later on if and when I have time.




posted on Nov, 20 2013 @ 06:19 AM
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I am fascinated by this thread.

I don't know if we are in the constellation of Cygnus or not, but one thing I find fascinating about constellations is evident in the constellation Cygnus itself.

The brightest star of the constellation, Deneb, forms the point at the "short end of the kite"

From Wikipedia: "Deneb appears to have a diameter of 100-200 times that of the Sun; if placed at the center of our Solar System, Deneb would extend halfway out to the orbit of the Earth.[14] It is one of the largest white stars known."

The consensus is that Deneb is anywhere from 1600 - 2600 ly from Earth.

Interestingly, out of the next eleven brightest stars in Cygnus, seven of them are within 68-171 light years from earth, with several of those being binary star systems, and a few multiple star systems.

When I look at Cygnus and imagine Deneb being the most massive super-giant of stars and so far away from all the others in the constellation,I can almost see it in 3D in a sense; and its glorious.

From what I have been reading, for most any constellation, the majority of the stars comprising it are less than a few thousand light years in distance, usually much less; with occasional exception of course.

Which of course also lends credence to the idea that constellations are NOT simply 2D pictures, but in a lot of cases actual groups of stars.

The blanket of stars in the universe is immense, we can only see so far.

Wouldn't it make sense that if there were ever any kind of galactic civilization out among the stars, that it would first happen in a constellation, in a group of many close stars.



posted on Nov, 22 2013 @ 09:47 AM
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JayDub113
...I don't know if we are in the constellation of Cygnus or not, but one thing I find fascinating about constellations is evident in the constellation Cygnus itself.

The brightest star of the constellation, Deneb, forms the point at the "short end of the kite"

From Wikipedia: "Deneb appears to have a diameter of 100-200 times that of the Sun; if placed at the center of our Solar System, Deneb would extend halfway out to the orbit of the Earth.[14] It is one of the largest white stars known."

The consensus is that Deneb is anywhere from 1600 - 2600 ly from Earth.

Interestingly, out of the next eleven brightest stars in Cygnus, seven of them are within 68-171 light years from earth, with several of those being binary star systems, and a few multiple star systems.

But as i mentioned before, not all of the stars we seen in a constellation are necessarily near each other in space. It has all to do with our point of view in seeing stars in 3D space against a basically 2D sky (i.e., we really have no depth perception when comparing star distances). Some stars in Cygnus may be close to Earth, while others may be very far away. Stars in other constellations on the other side of the sky may be closer to our Sun than that farthest stars in Cygnus.

For example, you mention Deneb in Cygnus as being somewhere between 1600 and 2600 LY from Earth. However, the three stars that comprise Orion's belt (Alnitak, Alnilam and Mintaka), and even Betelgeuse, which is also in Orion, are all closer to our Sun than Deneb -- even though they are in a totally different constellation as viewed from Earth.

Another example would be Alpha Centauri. Alpha Centauri is VERY close to Earth, but it is nowhere near Cygnus or Deneb. Some alien could be out there in the galaxy somewhere, seeing our sun and Alpha Centauri as part of one of their constellations that they can see in their sky, but Deneb and the other stars in Cygnus may appear to be nowhere near our Sun in their sky, and be in other constellations as they view them from their vantage point.

Then again, other aliens elsewhere in the galaxy may see our sun to appear to be right next to Deneb -- while in reality there are other stars that are closer -- such as the aforementioned Betelgeuse -- with Betelgeuse appearing to be in some other constellation in their sky, away from Deneb and our Sun.


edit on 11/22/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 01:00 PM
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Before anyone else jumps to conclusions re constellations and our sun here is one we made up which I posted earlier in the thread.


Orion Distances

Click on the link and LOOK at the distances of the stars in the Orion constellation as seen from Earth
there is about 1200 LIGHTS YEARS difference closest to furthest.

Constellations are made up by people with overactive imaginations years ago they are due to line of sight and NOTHING else.



posted on Dec, 3 2013 @ 05:48 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


You totally didn't get what I was saying at all or you wouldn't have given me this 'treat me like a third-grader' response.

I am fully aware Deneb is much farther than many of the other stars in the other constellations, that was the point. It is one of the biggest white dwarf stars known. I said that explicitly.

You also used the 'well you're looking at 3d as 2d and that's why blah blah" argument. Really? Do you honestly think I don't know that? Who is that for? Do you think anyone reading this site at all doesn't know that? Why are you typing?

What I said was; despite the very common knowledge that when we look at stars in the sky we are looking at 3d in 2d; the majority of the stars in any constellation are relatively close to one another, within 150 to 200 light years in many many cases, with the exception of the occasional super giant star far beyond that group of stars.

Wow ok, read a little.



posted on Dec, 4 2013 @ 12:46 AM
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from gliese 581 (a real exoplanetary system with a couple planets in it's habitable zone) sol looks like the tip of a claw or maybe a slingshot?




posted on Dec, 4 2013 @ 12:54 AM
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JayDub113
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


You totally didn't get what I was saying at all or you wouldn't have given me this 'treat me like a third-grader' response.

I am fully aware Deneb is much farther than many of the other stars in the other constellations, that was the point. It is one of the biggest white dwarf stars known. I said that explicitly.

You also used the 'well you're looking at 3d as 2d and that's why blah blah" argument. Really? Do you honestly think I don't know that? Who is that for? Do you think anyone reading this site at all doesn't know that? Why are you typing?

What I said was; despite the very common knowledge that when we look at stars in the sky we are looking at 3d in 2d; the majority of the stars in any constellation are relatively close to one another, within 150 to 200 light years in many many cases, with the exception of the occasional super giant star far beyond that group of stars.

Wow ok, read a little.


Constellations DON'T exist they are a creation of mans imagination!



posted on Dec, 4 2013 @ 03:09 PM
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of course they don't really exist, but they are a great way to orient your self in a location you may be unfamiliar with.

if you were on a planet around some distant star, wouldn't it be nice to be able to look at that alien sky, and easily pinpoint the cradle humanity came from?



posted on Dec, 5 2013 @ 03:04 AM
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Ophiuchus 13
If so which one?

It is an uneasy question to answer, but 1 was just wondering if ANY had a clue if the STAR SOL and its SOLar system was part of a Constellation group.


Imaginations welcome.

NAMASTE*******


Here's your answer....

I made this:



Constellations were a way that man arranged the sky due to pareidolia.

edit on 5-12-2013 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2013 @ 06:47 AM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 


So the Pleaides star cluster was invented by man? Star clusters were invented by man's pareidolia?
I understand what everyone is saying about the "pictures" in the constellations and all that, sure we made that up.

But it is also a fact that we live in a solar system that lives in an arm of the milky way galaxy, and the majority of the "constellations" we see are also within that same arm, very frequently being star clusters of some kind.

Yes, of course the "pictures" the stars make is an illusion, but the majority of the stars in any given constellation are grouped very close to one another on an interstellar scale.

The stars we see are in "our neighborhood" , and the universe is so very much more vast than what we see.

Sure the "picture view" of constellations is man-made, but Orion is a group of stars, most of them quite close together. So is the aforementioned Pleaides.

edit on 6-12-2013 by JayDub113 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2013 @ 08:41 AM
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I personally don't feel constellations are mere inventions. Since everything is energy waves, and certain areas do seem to share proximity, and for example pleiades is a part of Taurus, orion's belt, and orion's nebula's, we are mapping shapes in the stars patterns. This wasn't an accident. What we see here, is by design. And as its a hologram and we contain fractals, the entire thing is within us. Everything up there is within us.



posted on Dec, 6 2013 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 




I personally don't feel constellations are mere inventions.

Do you understand that the view of any constellation is relative to the observer's location?



posted on Dec, 6 2013 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


Of course, but wherever one would stand there would be patterns. And the "schools" are not so close together as all that, and the planets, moons and asteroids around us "in use" by Higher Ups and more advanced technical beings, aren't in the schools, so whatever they understand about the cosmos/constellations, the point is they don't need them as we do. For us these are star maps. IMO, we're in a big cosmic screen, ie, plasma television screen, aka David Bohm. And all the stars are connected.

Within regions of space, those inhabiting areas, have connections to their neighborhoods, so its still pretty much, this arm of the milky way, these are our neighbors, and in the lower level schools, we see the patterns, clusters of civilizations and energies.

Contactees/abductees, whichever word you wish, the communication takes place in human language, with human terms, ie orion, pleiades, sirius....And while here, our arrangements serve just fine.
edit on 6-12-2013 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2013 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 



Of course, but wherever one would stand there would be patterns.


In that particular line of sight. The farther the observer moves from that line of sight the more the pattern becomes distorted to the point of becoming unrecognizable. This in itself should be more than enough to illustrate the point that a "constellation" does not exist in and of itself. It's a product of physical perspective and nothing more.

Specific to the topic "Is SOL system part of a Constellation?"

Which constellation does our Sun belong to?

The Sun does not belong to any constellation. This is because our Earth goes around the Sun. As a result, the Sun moves in the sky relative to the other stars. So, the Sun appears to move through the constellations of the zodiac, which is why you hear that the Sun is in a particular zodiac constellation in a particular month. For example, in September, the Sun is in the constellation of Virgo. In October, it will go to the constellation of Libra, and so on.

More to read at the source curious.astro.cornell.edu...

Numerous extensions and variations of this simple fact have been used to illustrate the answer to the question.
At this point I can't be sure if you don't really get it or are just trying to irrationally rationalize magic from the stars so to speak.



posted on Dec, 7 2013 @ 08:05 AM
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reply to post by JayDub113
 


Constellation : a group of stars forming a recognizable pattern that is traditionally named after its apparent form or identified with a mythological figure

Important words in BOLD!

I will use Orion as an example again difference between closest and farthest away star from Earth is
around 1200 light years does it sink in now that there is NO such thing as a constellation.



posted on Dec, 7 2013 @ 08:13 AM
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Unity_99
I personally don't feel constellations are mere inventions. Since everything is energy waves, and certain areas do seem to share proximity, and for example pleiades is a part of Taurus, orion's belt, and orion's nebula's, we are mapping shapes in the stars patterns. This wasn't an accident. What we see here, is by design. And as its a hologram and we contain fractals, the entire thing is within us. Everything up there is within us.



By design my ass because stars are ALWAYS IN MOTION

Constellations 50,000 Years From Now



posted on Dec, 7 2013 @ 03:56 PM
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JayDub113


So the Pleaides star cluster was invented by man?


No, but the Pleiades (also known as M45) is not a constellation either. It's what is called an open cluster, of which there are many. Most of which do not have popular names but more like M44 or NGC 6633.


Star clusters were invented by man's pareidolia?


Nope, but star clusters are not what the OP was asking about.



Sure the "picture view" of constellations is man-made, but Orion is a group of stars, most of them quite close together. So is the aforementioned Pleaides.


No.

You are confusing two different things here. Star clusters are not constellations. Orion is a constellation of stars which are very far apart from each other it is not a star cluster.

Nature creates clusters. Man creates constellations.

Simple enough?
edit on 7-12-2013 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2013 @ 04:20 PM
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reply to post by JayDub113
 


Sorry if you felt that I was talking down to you, but I don't think I was. I was simply associating your post with the topic of this thread, and pointing out (in a matter-of-fact manner) that there is no way to say which constellation our Sun belongs to because constellations totally rely on the observer's point-of view in the galaxy.

I don't feel I was being condescending whatsoever, just being matter-of-fact.



Back to the topic:

You would be correct in saying that many of the stars in a given constellation are relatively near to each other in space, but there is still no way to say that our Sun is part of one of the constellations we see in the sky -- Cygnus or otherwise.

There is no one single constellation in the sky that could be said that our Sun belongs to. That's because the stars nearest to our Sun are all around us, scattered throughout our sky. Obviously, there is a local group of stars to which the Sun belongs, but those closest stars are in various constellations all over the sky, both in the Northern Hemisphere of stars and the Southern Hemisphere. The stars closest to earth do not make up a constellation in our sky.

To answer the OP's question, the Sun is NOT part of one of the constellations in our sky, because the Sun's closest neighbors are in many various constellations.

Then which stars would the Sun appear to be near if an alien was looking back? That would depend on how far away that alien was. If they were looking from one of our closest neighbors only a few light years away (say from CN Leonis, which is less than 10 LY away), the other stars close to the Sun (Alpha Centauri, Barnard's Star, Wolf 359, Lelande 21185, Sirius, and Procyon, to name a few) would be scattered all over the night sky on that planet. The Sun's neighbors would not be part of a constellation that includes our Sun.

If an alien from farther away (say 500 LY) was looking back, then the brightest stars near to the earth (Sirius and Procyon) would probably be near each other in that alien's sky, and would probably be part of one of that alien's constellations (being two bright stars near each other in that sky). I suppose the Earth would be in that same general direction as Sirius and Procyon, so it would probably be part of that alien constellation containing those two stars.

To be clear though, I'm not saying that the Sun is part of the constellations that we on Earth call Canis Major or Canis Minor (the Earth-point-of-view constellations that contain Sirius and Procyon). The other stars in those constellations are not necessarily near our Sun, so our Sun is not part of those constellations.




edit on 12/7/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2013 @ 05:08 PM
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wmd_2008

Unity_99
I personally don't feel constellations are mere inventions. Since everything is energy waves, and certain areas do seem to share proximity, and for example pleiades is a part of Taurus, orion's belt, and orion's nebula's, we are mapping shapes in the stars patterns. This wasn't an accident. What we see here, is by design. And as its a hologram and we contain fractals, the entire thing is within us. Everything up there is within us.



By design my ass because stars are ALWAYS IN MOTION

Constellations 50,000 Years From Now


Certainly, all in motion, but moving in relationship with each other. Well maybe. I don't know for sure. I do remember a physics video that explained something I was shown by my own HS/Guide, and that is impossible to search for.

It showed many photographs. And then expressed time was not linear. I'd say there is no time,its just a clock in our heads and our own star is a clock, but stars are different sizes, and in the cosmic tv school hologram, everyone's time zone/realm is different, so some of us don't see everything. ie. if you programmed a bot to experience your day in 15 minutes, one of you would disappear from the other's sight, but the other would be standing still or extreme slow mode. So the universe isn't one homoginzed thing but many things....

Now, in the photographs, it was expressed that, rather than linear movment, which is what orbits and spiralling energies and the sun traveling through space, would entail, which is our science and does make sense of our natural world as we experience it through our brain programs, but....what is actually happening is that every nano second, everything is being recreated afresh, it disappears and reappears, not the same but new. And what causes this, is change. Its like a computer program that recreates the data with every change....

Also that all the snapshots are all at once and not linear. And that makes movement more like flicking through a stack of photos in the olden days...More of an illusion.


edit on 7-12-2013 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)




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