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Fossilized "Iguana" of Mars? Curiosity sol 153.

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posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 02:12 PM
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Some more engineered rocks here. www.abovetopsecret.com...




posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 02:15 PM
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reply to post by skalla
 





we may as well post pictures of vegetables that look like other things. Sad Potatoes, a Parsnip with a dick, a Turnip with buttocks.


Been done on ATS many times and it was an interesting topic also.



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 02:21 PM
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JayinAR

Char-Lee

JayinAR
That is not a petrified iguana.
I'm beginning to think some folks around here post these threads simply for stars and flags.
Honestly.

Yes it looks like an iguana, but its obviously a damn rock.

The comparison to the bodies in Pompey are faulty, as has been pointed out twice now and still just sorta sits there.

Something like an iguana would be the least likely candidate for fossilization. The darn thing falls apart with the slightest tug on the tail. Why would you expect to see eyes and not holes in the skull where the eyes used to be?

Good grief, this is just silliness.

How about the odds that life on Mars would have evolved to the exact same biodiversity we see here on Earth?? Astronomical in the strictest possible sense.


Nothing about Mars is obvious, we don't even know what happened to the oceans or the atmosphere, but it is thought of have been very like earth so the odds of very similar life forms is great.


Early Mars had a carbon dioxide atmosphere similar in thickness to present-day Earth (1000 hPa).[10] Despite a weak early Sun, the greenhouse effect from a thick carbon dioxide atmosphere,


We know very little, changes in temperature and atmosphere as well as dust storms when rapid could account for preserved life forms.

I actually feel sorry for people who think they know these things for sure. I remember when they told us there would be very very few of the rare suns that had planets around them and I laughed.


You don't understand what I am saying.

Here on Earth, for instance, we are only one comet strike, or asteroid strike, or super volcano eruption, etc away from having a completely different eco system.

The odds of two planets, side by side no less, having the exact same species of animal, are incredibly large. Millions of years with the same conditions would be required.

One planet gets hit with a giant asteroid? Well the same better happen to the other or the lifeforms are gonna look way different in short order...


There are many many possibilities at this moment we are babes in the woods!


Marc Kaufman
for National Geographic
Published September 5, 2013

Did life begin on Mars and then travel to Earth for its blossoming?


A long-debated and often-dismissed theory known as "panspermia" got new life in the past week, as two scientists separately proposed that early Earth lacked some chemicals essential to forming life, while early Mars likely had them.


news.nationalgeographic.com...



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 02:23 PM
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If anyone cares, or sees me as some hardcore anti mars sceptic or somesuch, i have seen a UFO, and made a thread on it. I believe there was life on Mars, though i strongly doubt that there was ever civilisation or intelligent life there. I'd love to see proof otherwise. I would frikkin cream myself. There.

reply to post by JayinAR
 


Absolutely.

Here is a flint i own, at the top of the pic.



It a crappy camera phone pic, In real life, those veins really pop.
Apart from it's "hurr-hurrrr" value it's of no merit, just like the Iguana



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 02:34 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


For "chit chat" on BTS maybe, but space exploration? No way, it's joke material - i've spent large amounts of the last ten years working on a farm too, and have harvested lots of root veg with tallywackers and lady gardens. I did indeed laugh every time and proudly pass them around. When i chopped them up for the pot, i always mutilated the genitalia first


As i said in another Arken thread, i also once found a rock that really looked like the face of a friend of mine, quite uncannily so. It did not merit pages of discussion and conjecture though. I took it home and it sat on my mantelpiece for a while, until i moved house and decided to rehome it in my old garden.

edit on 6-11-2013 by skalla because: saying "though" too much



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 02:45 PM
link   

Char-Lee

JayinAR

Char-Lee

JayinAR
That is not a petrified iguana.
I'm beginning to think some folks around here post these threads simply for stars and flags.
Honestly.

Yes it looks like an iguana, but its obviously a damn rock.

The comparison to the bodies in Pompey are faulty, as has been pointed out twice now and still just sorta sits there.

Something like an iguana would be the least likely candidate for fossilization. The darn thing falls apart with the slightest tug on the tail. Why would you expect to see eyes and not holes in the skull where the eyes used to be?

Good grief, this is just silliness.

How about the odds that life on Mars would have evolved to the exact same biodiversity we see here on Earth?? Astronomical in the strictest possible sense.


Nothing about Mars is obvious, we don't even know what happened to the oceans or the atmosphere, but it is thought of have been very like earth so the odds of very similar life forms is great.


Early Mars had a carbon dioxide atmosphere similar in thickness to present-day Earth (1000 hPa).[10] Despite a weak early Sun, the greenhouse effect from a thick carbon dioxide atmosphere,


We know very little, changes in temperature and atmosphere as well as dust storms when rapid could account for preserved life forms.

I actually feel sorry for people who think they know these things for sure. I remember when they told us there would be very very few of the rare suns that had planets around them and I laughed.


You don't understand what I am saying.

Here on Earth, for instance, we are only one comet strike, or asteroid strike, or super volcano eruption, etc away from having a completely different eco system.

The odds of two planets, side by side no less, having the exact same species of animal, are incredibly large. Millions of years with the same conditions would be required.

One planet gets hit with a giant asteroid? Well the same better happen to the other or the lifeforms are gonna look way different in short order...


There are many many possibilities at this moment we are babes in the woods!


Marc Kaufman
for National Geographic
Published September 5, 2013

Did life begin on Mars and then travel to Earth for its blossoming?


A long-debated and often-dismissed theory known as "panspermia" got new life in the past week, as two scientists separately proposed that early Earth lacked some chemicals essential to forming life, while early Mars likely had them.


news.nationalgeographic.com...


You know what, you're absolutely right.
How stupid of me. Panspermia perfectly accounts for the issues I presented.

I'm off to find a fossilized kangaroo on Mars! Surely if there is an iguana then there will be kangaroos, crocodiles and everything else!
/sarcasm
*face palm*
*eye roll*

ETA: question. Did the iguana hop a ride on an Earth bound asteroid from Mars?
edit on 6-11-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by skalla
 


You could probably market that thing, man.
Its quite impressive.
Haha



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 03:40 PM
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What Char-Lee posted a picture of was a bearded Dragon & here's a picture
of an Iguana.

4.bp.blogspot.com...


Sorry I forgot how to get a photo to load that's not in my library.

I always enjoy your finds Arken!

Cheers
Ektar



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 04:14 PM
link   

JayinAR

Char-Lee

JayinAR

Char-Lee

JayinAR
That is not a petrified iguana.
I'm beginning to think some folks around here post these threads simply for stars and flags.
Honestly.

Yes it looks like an iguana, but its obviously a damn rock.

The comparison to the bodies in Pompey are faulty, as has been pointed out twice now and still just sorta sits there.

Something like an iguana would be the least likely candidate for fossilization. The darn thing falls apart with the slightest tug on the tail. Why would you expect to see eyes and not holes in the skull where the eyes used to be?

Good grief, this is just silliness.

How about the odds that life on Mars would have evolved to the exact same biodiversity we see here on Earth?? Astronomical in the strictest possible sense.


Nothing about Mars is obvious, we don't even know what happened to the oceans or the atmosphere, but it is thought of have been very like earth so the odds of very similar life forms is great.


Early Mars had a carbon dioxide atmosphere similar in thickness to present-day Earth (1000 hPa).[10] Despite a weak early Sun, the greenhouse effect from a thick carbon dioxide atmosphere,


We know very little, changes in temperature and atmosphere as well as dust storms when rapid could account for preserved life forms.

I actually feel sorry for people who think they know these things for sure. I remember when they told us there would be very very few of the rare suns that had planets around them and I laughed.


You don't understand what I am saying.

Here on Earth, for instance, we are only one comet strike, or asteroid strike, or super volcano eruption, etc away from having a completely different eco system.

The odds of two planets, side by side no less, having the exact same species of animal, are incredibly large. Millions of years with the same conditions would be required.

One planet gets hit with a giant asteroid? Well the same better happen to the other or the lifeforms are gonna look way different in short order...


There are many many possibilities at this moment we are babes in the woods!


Marc Kaufman
for National Geographic
Published September 5, 2013

Did life begin on Mars and then travel to Earth for its blossoming?


A long-debated and often-dismissed theory known as "panspermia" got new life in the past week, as two scientists separately proposed that early Earth lacked some chemicals essential to forming life, while early Mars likely had them.


news.nationalgeographic.com...


You know what, you're absolutely right.
How stupid of me. Panspermia perfectly accounts for the issues I presented.

I'm off to find a fossilized kangaroo on Mars! Surely if there is an iguana then there will be kangaroos, crocodiles and everything else!
/sarcasm
*face palm*
*eye roll*

ETA: question. Did the iguana hop a ride on an Earth bound asteroid from Mars?
edit on 6-11-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)


Long ago when I was in college a professor explained to us why it is probable that animals in similar environments, including humans would likely be very similar, as the way things develope are dependant on the environment they are in.

At that time they were teaching that if we were to come across aliens there was a good change they actually would look very similar to us. There was very good reasoning for this based on development starting as we believe life to have started.
All things are still open and on the table, the same comets and asteroids have passed most of our systems planets and life as we know it could actually have sprung from there.
For all we know a martian came to earth when his planets was crippled with an ark of their living creatures and thus we would have the same identical creatures.

I do wonder why it makes you so angry, that people look and think differently than you, why can't people bring their thoughts and ideas to the table without being all down on what they think is wrong. In the end many top scientists have been proven wrong and many who were laughed at were proven right. Why not just enjoy a discussion until all things are clear sometime in the future.
edit on 6-11-2013 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 05:22 PM
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We shall call thee Sir Arken Hoagland.


Seriously though, thats a rock.



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 06:04 PM
link   

Char-Lee

JayinAR

Char-Lee

JayinAR

Char-Lee

JayinAR
That is not a petrified iguana.
I'm beginning to think some folks around here post these threads simply for stars and flags.
Honestly.

Yes it looks like an iguana, but its obviously a damn rock.

The comparison to the bodies in Pompey are faulty, as has been pointed out twice now and still just sorta sits there.

Something like an iguana would be the least likely candidate for fossilization. The darn thing falls apart with the slightest tug on the tail. Why would you expect to see eyes and not holes in the skull where the eyes used to be?

Good grief, this is just silliness.

How about the odds that life on Mars would have evolved to the exact same biodiversity we see here on Earth?? Astronomical in the strictest possible sense.


Nothing about Mars is obvious, we don't even know what happened to the oceans or the atmosphere, but it is thought of have been very like earth so the odds of very similar life forms is great.


Early Mars had a carbon dioxide atmosphere similar in thickness to present-day Earth (1000 hPa).[10] Despite a weak early Sun, the greenhouse effect from a thick carbon dioxide atmosphere,


We know very little, changes in temperature and atmosphere as well as dust storms when rapid could account for preserved life forms.

I actually feel sorry for people who think they know these things for sure. I remember when they told us there would be very very few of the rare suns that had planets around them and I laughed.


You don't understand what I am saying.

Here on Earth, for instance, we are only one comet strike, or asteroid strike, or super volcano eruption, etc away from having a completely different eco system.

The odds of two planets, side by side no less, having the exact same species of animal, are incredibly large. Millions of years with the same conditions would be required.

One planet gets hit with a giant asteroid? Well the same better happen to the other or the lifeforms are gonna look way different in short order...


There are many many possibilities at this moment we are babes in the woods!


Marc Kaufman
for National Geographic
Published September 5, 2013

Did life begin on Mars and then travel to Earth for its blossoming?


A long-debated and often-dismissed theory known as "panspermia" got new life in the past week, as two scientists separately proposed that early Earth lacked some chemicals essential to forming life, while early Mars likely had them.


news.nationalgeographic.com...


You know what, you're absolutely right.
How stupid of me. Panspermia perfectly accounts for the issues I presented.

I'm off to find a fossilized kangaroo on Mars! Surely if there is an iguana then there will be kangaroos, crocodiles and everything else!
/sarcasm
*face palm*
*eye roll*

ETA: question. Did the iguana hop a ride on an Earth bound asteroid from Mars?
edit on 6-11-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)


Long ago when I was in college a professor explained to us why it is probable that animals in similar environments, including humans would likely be very similar, as the way things develope are dependant on the environment they are in.

At that time they were teaching that if we were to come across aliens there was a good change they actually would look very similar to us. There was very good reasoning for this based on development starting as we believe life to have started.
All things are still open and on the table, the same comets and asteroids have passed most of our systems planets and life as we know it could actually have sprung from there.
For all we know a martian came to earth when his planets was crippled with an ark of their living creatures and thus we would have the same identical creatures.

I do wonder why it makes you so angry, that people look and think differently than you, why can't people bring their thoughts and ideas to the table without being all down on what they think is wrong. In the end many top scientists have been proven wrong and many who were laughed at were proven right. Why not just enjoy a discussion until all things are clear sometime in the future.
edit on 6-11-2013 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)


I'm not angry at all. I was having a bit of a laugh.
If I came across as angry please accept my apology.
I can see how evolution may tend to produce similar physiologies, as in two arms, two legs, two eyeballs, etc, but it is a giant leap to say that the species would be identical. Too many things would have to coincide over vast periods of time in order for that to happen, IMO. Borderline impossible.

Unless one IS suggesting directed panspermia. But in this case I still highly doubt it because we are talking about tossing aside all of our evolutionary biology textbooks and saying "God (aliens) did it."

I can't buy that.
Nor can I buy that we are looking at anything more than an nteresting looking rock in the OP.

Here is a question: where are the petrified lizards on our own planet? When we unearth dinosaurs all we find are fossilized skeletons. But miraculously in this OP we have an intact lizard, soft tissues and all.

We can either accept our science or toss it all out the window, cuz by god that rock looks like a lizard.

Its hilarious.



posted on Nov, 6 2013 @ 11:58 PM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Come on dude.

Why don't you find several pictures of KNOWN rocks, from some desert on planet Earth, and try and find things that look like fossils (but aren't). And then compare that to the number of "fossils" you think you see from images of Mars.

Have you done anything like that at all? Anything to compare your data sets for statistical process control? Otherwise what you're doing is a complete waste of time. You're just looking at rocks.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 01:47 AM
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The Pyroclastic flow theory is actually not a bad one, but your forget a very important part of it: the Pyroclastic dust that settles on EVERYTHING after the volcanic activity is over. The findings in Pompeii were covered in several layers of dust before they were excavated. So where is the dust on Mars? Who or what has dug out the slugs and the lizzards from under the several layers of thick volcanic dust? The Mars wind?

I always believed in ETs and that we are not alone in the Galaxy, I also believe that Mars was once a habitable planet - billions of years ago. Even if we COULD find anything that could prove that there was once life on Mars, it would most likely be underground, under the thick dust, and not on the surface. If NASA would engineer a Mars Excavator that would be able to dig down and take soil samples from, let's say, 5-10 meters underground, I bet we could find interesting stuff. If not fossils, then maybe rare elements or minerals.

Looking for fossils on the surface is a waste of time. Even if Mars was habitable once, full of life, the billions of years that passed surely had their toll on the fossils. Just think about the Sahara Desert. Would you think that it was once a rainforest? Now it's just sand. Several meters of sand. Fossils are buried very deep under the dunes. And only a few million years have passed. How would it look like after a billion years? I bet that it would look similar to Mars. So would you start looking for fossils on the surface?

A good chance of finding fossils (if there are any) would be looking in the mountainous area and look for caves. Easy access to the underground tunnels (because if there was water running and active volcanoes, there has to be tunnels). There, in the tunnels and caves I bet we would be able to find at least a tiny fraction of the remains of a once great and flourishing life on Mars. But not on the surface... If it's on the surface it's either a rock or a hoax. Or a very recent alien visitation, which I doubt.



edit on 7-11-2013 by Lacerta because: (I like to edit my stuff, mkay?)

edit on 7-11-2013 by Lacerta because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 02:50 AM
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reply to post by Lacerta
 


Thanks for this meaningful comment Lacerta. Appreciate.



Looking for fossils on the surface is a waste of time. Even if Mars was habitable once, full of life, the billions of years that passed surely had their toll on the fossils. Just think about the Sahara Desert. Would you think that it was once a rainforest? Now it's just sand. Several meters of sand. Fossils are buried very deep under the dunes. And only a few million years have passed. How would it look like after a billion years? I bet that it would look similar to Mars. So would you start looking for fossils on the surface?


But....

Why billions of years? Maybe 1 million, 100k years or.....

No one knows exactly (scientifically proven) when the cataclismatic event that hit Mars, has occurred.
Only speculations and theory.

Maybe not one ELE (extintion level event) but several, and in different ages. Like here on Eart.

Mars was like Earth in its far past with its oceans, lakes and rivers. There was water on its surface. Gale Crater was a huge lake. This, is certain.

So... for the occam razor... there must been life in its waters...and now... Fossils.

About the Sahara desert: not millions years.
Recents discovies in Atlas Mountains in Morocco (10 years ago) confirm that "only" 15.000 years ago, there was a wet Jungle... where now is desert...
edit on 7-11-2013 by Arken because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 08:09 AM
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love these threads, its a rock tho.

Plus, im pretty sure a fosilized animal wouldnt look that good.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Just a few thoughts on this:

Lava fields, ventifacts, basalt erosion, salt weathering etc. - all that is fine and well. And all of those factors could be possible explanations for a lot of weird rocks on Mars. In fact, Occam's razor would really force us to start with these aspects when explaining how certain rocks may have formed.

On the other hand, I believe Paredolia is completely overrated as a way to explain away what some posters on here pointed out as being noteworthy in the terrain. We, as humans, are experts at recognizing meaningful shapes among a myriad of chaotic or meaningless features. This capability is closely linked to our survival and a key part of our own evolution. So while I admit that it can be deceptive in some cases, we should also consider it to be a useful skill for identifying meaningful patterns in certain other cases.

That said, I think that visual indications in the terrain are still quite important (in addition to other data like SAM, ChemCam and other instruments). That's why I also believe that some of the more distinctive rock formations should have been investigated by MSL/Curiosity up-close and in much more detail (which perhaps even took place, inofficially). And I'm not talking about a hundred different rocks on every sol, but just a few formations that stood out - mostly at Yellowknife Bay and Rocknest - and which have been discussed in great detail on this forum and other conspiracy boards.

By the way: thanks for posting and keep up the good work, Arken!



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 10:26 AM
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You know what this looks like? It looks like a rock that looks like chicken with four legs. The other day I saw a cloud that looked like a turtle. Isn't it fun how our brains turn random shapes into things we are familiar with? That's who's lying to you. I mean, yeah, sometimes it's the government, but mostly it's just your own brain.
edit on 7-11-2013 by nghtshd because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 11:10 AM
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You know this is the same thing as finding pictures and things that look like someone or something in clouds.Just doing it with a pile of rocks.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 





Here is a question: where are the petrified lizards on our own planet? When we unearth dinosaurs all we find are fossilized skeletons. But miraculously in this OP we have an intact lizard, soft tissues and all.


What would happen if it suddenly stopped raining, if our atmosphere were suddenly ripped away by a collision. What would fossils be like then of those that died in an instant? In very cold dry climates on earth we get some mummified and fleshy fossils.

Also consider that this may have been buried and the windstorms uncovered it. Imagine a planet wide disaster that kicked tons of dust into the atmosphere and buried many living things instantly.

Consider what happens in areas like McMurdo Dry Valleys a mars like climate.

I do know that as far as fossils persons who don't recognize them often walk right over them thinking they are "just rocks".

I understand your thought on time and identical form but we don't know what happened on Mars or our own planet enough to say imo.

It is probably a rock, but we can't know that. All we have of Mars right now is speculation, which is fun and interesting until we know more.



posted on Nov, 7 2013 @ 12:18 PM
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Zoom in to where the 5 would be on a clock and you will notice a bullet/bomb/dildo hiding behind a rock. mars.jpl.nasa.gov...
Hope you dont mind arken .



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